Horse Racing Tips

first_imgJermaine Barnaby/Freelance PhotographerLAZZA, (right) with Hakeem Pottinger aboard, sprints to a one- and three-quarters lengths win over GOLD SCREW, with Melissa Ward, in the Jockeys’ Guild of Jamaica Trophy race at Caymanas Park last Saturday.last_img

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‘Rude Boy’ Brown ready for UFC clash

first_img“… I want to basically decapitate him!”Well then.Jamaican Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter Randy ‘Rude Boy’ Brown hardly sounds like a man who will be featuring in only his second UFC bout tonight.Brown summed up his intentions when he steps into the cage against Michael Graves – eerie name – in a UFC on Fox 19 fight at the Amalie Arena in Tampa, Florida.The welterweight clash, which starts at 4:30 p.m. (3:30 p.m. Jamaica time), falls on the under card for the main event fight between light heavyweight stars Glover Teixeira and Rashad Evans.Brown (7-0-0), who impressed in his UFC debut earlier this year after a unanimous decision win over Matt Dwyer, says he can hardly wait to face the undefeated Graves (5-0-0).”I’m super anxious right now, man. I’m ready. I’ve been feeling it in my workouts. Every system in my body is on, and I’m just looking forward to going out there to perform,” he told The Gleaner from Florida on Thursday. “I just can’t wait!”It’s a fight that will pit two warriors with conflicting styles against each other, with Brown’s stand-and-deliver, kick-and-punch arsenal going up against Graves’ canvas-loving, grappling preference.”He (Graves) is a tough guy, very durable,” Brown assessed. “He’s always looking to get you to the ground in a lock or a submission hold.”I am more of a fighter – I want to kick and punch. He wants to get me on the ground, hold me there, let time run out and win a decision, but I’m looking to decapitate him and take his head off, so it should be a good fight,” Brown added – not one to mince his words.And why should he?Finally on the UFC big stage, life was always a fight for the 25 year-old.Brown, who now lives in Jamaica, Queens, New York, grew up with his mother in Old Harbour, St Catherine. Things were hardly stable and he would soon move to live with his brothers in the gritty March Pen Road community in Spanish Town.He would eventually move to the United States at age 16, where he got involved with boxing.No turning back from MMABut that was just a fling. His real love was combat sports, and when he was introduced to MMA, he knew right away that there would be no turning back.Still, if anyone is expecting this UFC newbie, who – by the way, has only seven professional MMA fights in his legs – all without defeat – to feel any nerves in the cage, Brown says he is more than ready for the extra pressure and attention.”This has always been a goal for me ever since being back home in Jamaica. It’s been on my mind – combat sports and getting a chance to fight in the biggest organisation on offer, UFC. That is just huge for me,” Brown said.”Everyone expects me to perform and all the eyes are on me for Saturday (tonight), but there is no pressure, and I am looking forward to it,” he said.Brown is planning to travel to Jamaica spend a few days with his family in the coming days.But for now, the Rude Boy’s focus is clearly set on putting a foot – or fist – to Graves’ dome.last_img read more

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Hamilton dominant in Japan

first_imgSUZUKA, Japan (AP): Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton pulled off an aggressive passing move on teammate Nico Rosberg and went on to win the Japanese Grand Prix yesterday, moving a step closer to claiming his second straight Formula One title. Hamilton, who had his first retirement of the season at last weekend’s Singapore GP, capitalised on a strong start and surged ahead of Rosberg at the first corner. He led the rest of the way, crossing the finish line a comfortable 18.9 seconds ahead. Ferrari driver Sebastian Vettel was third, 1.8 seconds behind Rosberg, who started from pole. With five races left, Hamilton has a 48-point lead over Rosberg. Hamilton claimed his eighth win of the season. It was his 41st career win, tying him with his childhood hero Ayrton Senna. “I’m not a teary guy, but I’m full of joy and happiness today,” Hamilton said. ‘A PITY’ The podium positions were exactly the same as last year’s race at Suzuka, which was marred by a crash involving Jules Bianchi, who died in July, having never regained consciousness. Force India’s Niko Hulkenberg was sixth while the Lotus pair of Romain Grosjean and Pastor Maldonado finished seventh and eighth, giving the financially strapped team a confidence boost. Toro Rosso’s Max Verstappen – in his last race as a 17-year-old – was ninth ahead of his teammate Carlos Sainz Jr. Both Red Bull cars finished outside the top 10. Daniil Kvyat started from the pits, while Daniel Ricciardo had a tire-bumping duel with Williams’ Felipe Massa soon after the start, leaving both with punctures that forced them to pit after one lap. The next race is the Russian GP in Sochi on October 11. same winners Rosberg and Hamilton went through the first two bends side by side. Hamilton appeared to give Rosberg little room at the second turn, forcing the German partially off the track. “I didn’t think it was that close,” Hamilton said. “The inside line is the inside line, so it was my corner.” Rosberg was reserving judgment until he saw the incident on replay. “It was a pity to do that on the start,” Rosberg said. “We battled around Turns One and Two. It got very close on the exit at Turn Two and I had to back out and that cost me the race.” With Hamilton comfortably ahead throughout the grand prix, the focus shifted to the tight battle for second place between Rosberg and Vettel. Ferrari elected to wait until Rosberg pitted before bringing in Vettel, and that proved critical. Even though Vettel’s stop was four-tenths of a second faster than Rosberg’s, the Mercedes driver’s lap on fresh rubber was enough to get him just ahead of Vettel, and that’s how it stayed. “I tried everything,” Vettel said. “The tires were on the limit – not more that I could have done.” Vettel’s Ferrari teammate Kimi Raikkonen was fourth followed by Williams’ Valtteri Bottas.last_img read more

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Gayle’s whirlwind 76 not enough for RCB

first_imgBANGALORE, India (CMC): West Indies batting star Chris Gayle smashed a whirlwind half-century and passed 9,000 runs in Twenty20s, but his effort was in vain as Sunrisers Hyderabad edged Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) by eight runs to lift the 2016 Indian Premier League yesterday. Chasing an imposing 209 for victory in the final at the M Chinnaswamy Stadium, RCB were propelled by the left-handed Gayle’s top score of 76 off 38 deliveries with four fours and eight massive sixes. He put on 114 for the first wicket with the prolific captain, Virat Kohli, who hammered 58 off 34 balls, but once they were separated, the RCB innings collapsed from 140 for one as six wickets tumbled for 54 runs. RCB required 18 from the last over, but seamer Bhuvneshwar Kumar proved brilliant, conceding just nine runs. The foundation of Sunrisers’ victory was laid by captain David Warner, who pummelled 69 from 38 deliveries at the top of the order. Fellow Australian, Ben Cutting, who was voted Man of the Match, stroked an unbeaten 39 from just 15 balls with three fours and four sixes while veteran left-hander Yuvraj Singh hit 38 from 22 deliveries. The left-handed Warner, who counted eight fours and three sixes, put on 63 for the first wicket with Shikhar Dhawan (28) and a further 34 for the second wicket with another Australian, Moises Henriques (4). Gayle, who shared the new ball, finished wicketless from his three overs of off-spin, which cost 23 runs, while Barbados-born England seamer Chris Jordan claimed three for 45. CLEARING THE BOUNDARY Needing to score at 10.45 runs an over, RCB were given a flying start by the mercurial Gayle. His first 16 runs needed 13 deliveries, but he teed off in the third over from left-arm seamer Barinder Sran, which went for 16 runs, twice clearing the boundary and then finding it on another occasion. The Jamaican reached his half-century off 25 balls by belting Henriques over long on off for six and he combined with Kohli to rip into the Aussie seamer in the ninth over, which leaked 21 runs. Gayle seemed en route to his 18th T20 hundred when he miscued a big hit at seamer Cutting and was caught at third man. One of the world’s leading T20 batsmen, Gayle now has 9,066 runs in the game’s shortest format. Kohli carried on, raising his half-century with a six off Sran in the 13th over, but he fell a couple of balls later in the same over, as Sunrisers hit back strongly.last_img read more

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Blake to retain JAAA presidency without challenge

first_img “Under Blake’s presidency Jamaica has had its best performances on the world stage in track and field as at the Beijing Olympics in 2012 the country was second overall of 212 Federations while at the recent Rio Olympic Games we stood tall. We have also had outstanding results at the World Youth and World Junior Champion-ships, and we continue to dominate at the Carifta Games and those are indications that our president is doing an excellent job,” Gayle reasoned. There could, however, be some changes on the new executive body with Gayle, without revealing the identities of the non-returning members confirmed the developments. “All I can say at this moment is that a press release will soon be out and the public will know who the members are who will make up the new executive,” said Gayle. BEST PERFORMANCES Dr Warren Blake will be returned unopposed as president of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA) at next Tuesday’s Annual General Meeting set for the Medallion Hall Hotel. Blake, who ascended to the post following the death of then President Howard Aris in November 2011, was earlier this year expected to face a challenge, but will now be ushered into another four-year term along with his executive, following the closing of nominations on Saturday. The incumbent has no company for the presidential post with JAAA general secretary Garth Gayle confirming this in a recent chat with The Gleaner. “At closing time of nomination on Saturday, November 19 only one group had been nominated where the election will only be contested by the 17 members from the group and the only thing left to be done is for these 17 members to be ratified by the members of the committee,” said Gayle, who has held his position in the association since 2000. Earlier in the year there were news swirling in the public that Blake would have been strongly challenged with a member of his own executive, Dave Myrie, the first vice-president heavily tipped to go against Blake. However, in an interview several weeks ago, Myrie hinted that he was not contesting the election. Giving his opinion on the reasons behind the lack of challenge, Gayle backed Blake’s stewardship of the organisation over the past five years. “I cannot speak why others have changed their mind, and I can only talk for mypresident. I think people have seen where he has done a great job and realised that it will be of no use in challenging him,” Gayle said.last_img read more

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800m outlook not bright

first_imgIn the last three years, Calabar High School, Kingston College (KC), and St Jago high school have all run promising times in the 4×800 metre relay. In the same period, Calabar, St Elizabeth Technical and St Jago have won the eight-lap event at the Penn Relays with the 2014 win by Calabar ending a five year Jamaican drought. However, Calabar’s head coach Michael Clarke doesn’t believe those results will automatically lead to Jamaicans advancing in the individual 800 metres.Asked recently about Jamaica’s 800-metre prospects, Clarke said he didn’t think success would come easily even though Calabar, KC and St Jago have run 7 minutes 33.39 seconds, 7.33.87 and 7.33.71 for the 4×800 relay in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively.”Coming from our legacies and our culture, we are sprint fed, sprint nurtured on sprinting cuisine that it’s going to be difficult to be surpassed by any other event, well certainly not in our generation,” Clarke assessed.”I don’t know what the future holds but not in our generation,” underlined Clarke, who has helped Jamaican athletes at the World Championships and the Olympics in addition to winning high school championships at Calabar, Jamaica College and St Jago.Some of the statistics confirm this viewpoint.ONLY JAMAICANKenia Sinclair, in 2008, became the only Jamaican to reach an Olympic 800m final since George Kerr crossed the line in fourth at the 1964 Games in Tokyo. While Sinclair’s national record of 1 minute 57.88 seconds was set as recently as 2006, the men’s mark was established in 1977 by Seymour Newman at 1 minute 45.21 seconds.At the junior level, things are a little better as St Jago’s Leon Clarke reached the World Youth Championships final last year and lowered his personal best to 1 minute 50.49 seconds. Before that, the last Jamaican boy to reach a World Youth or World Junior final was Aldwyn Sappleton in 2000.Carlene Robinson won a bronze medal for Jamaica in the girls’ World Youth event in 2001.Clarke’s observation comes not long after Warren Blake, the president of the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association announced that hopes of a coaching exchange with distance power Kenya was once again on the discussion table.last_img read more

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“Sub Zero” Lewis fights in Barbados tonight

first_imgRamel ‘Sub Zero’ Lewis will be making an effort to end 2016 on a positive note tonight when he clashes with Barbadian Christopher ‘Shaka’ Henry in an eight-round junior middleweight main bout on a Pro-Am Dinner-Boxing show at the Lloyd Erskine Sandiford Centre in St Michael, Barbados. Also on the card will be amateur bantamweight boxer Felice Groves.Lewis and Henry know each other as they have been together in the Wray and Nephew Contender series, but they never met before. Henry last fought here in 2015 when he lost by retirement in the fourth round in a bout against Tsetsi Davis.Lewis fought in the Contender series this year, and after defeating Fred Muhammad by technical knockout in his first fight, he lost to Michael Gardener on points. He has always been a Contender favourite because of his aggressive style of boxing and reached the finals in 2012, where he lost on points to Donovan ‘Police’ Campbell over 10 rounds.Before leaving Jamaica on Wednesday, Lewis said he was confident of victory.”I have been training hard for this fight, and I will be going in with one goal, and that is to win. Shaka is a good fighter, but I am going to pressure him all the way,” Lewis said.A close, hard-fought contest is expected.last_img read more

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Tony Becca | How long shall we wait?

first_img To be fair, however, the selectors have no Christopher Gayle, no Marlon Samuels, and no Darren Bravo, and they are not blessed with a team of Roy Fredericks, Garry Sobers, Rohan Kanhai, Seymour Nurse, Lawrence Rowe, Alvin Kallicharran or Clive Lloyd, so that they could bring in a young Rowe and a young Kallicharran, a young Greenidge and a young Richards, a young Richie Richardson, and a young Brian Lara without the pressure to perform immediately. It will take a long, long time to produce a West Indies team with senior players of that calibre so that the young players who come into the team will have the kind of “presence” that the senior players provide, so that they can relax and develop their skills to its fullest, but the move must be made now. The coaches owe it to West Indies cricket to work hard on the present youngsters, to speak to them whenever they see these mistakes, and not to allow them to continue in the same vein while the coaches grumble under their breaths about the players’ attitude. The young cricketers in the region also owe it to the fans to listen to the coaches, to dedicate themselves to success, and not be satisfied to just play for the West Indies. West Indies cricket is now paying its coaches and players, and they must earn their money. The board, or territorial boards, musts see to it that they are not only professionals by getting paid, but that they are professionals in their attitude to playing the game. That attitude must include the level of work they put in an effort to become good and better players. I am tired, for instance, to see an opening batsman getting out caught in the slips and to hear the excuse that he got out because the ball swung through the air as if he, a Test match batsman, did not expect that the bowler, a Test match bowler, could or would swing the ball through the air. A professional is expected to perform beyond the ordinary. The psyche in West Indies cricket must change if the results are to change. Although they are privileged to represent the West Indies, these West Indies cricketers do not deserve to behave like stars, or to be treated as such, especially looking at their returns in the past 20 years or so. Losing is not a disgrace, but playing badly, and for so long, is embarrassing. It is a long time to be losing, however, and to be classed in the same argument, with not only Bangladesh and Zimbabwe, but also with Ireland and Afghanistan, is a bit frustrating. The second Test starts today at Kensington Oval and the hope is that this one will provide some sunshine, even a little bit, for the fans. Senior players When I was a boy, I remember reciting, time and time again, something that went like this, “Riddle me this, riddle me that, guess me this riddle or perhaps not.” Although I found out later that “riddle” means something wrapped in a mystery, I never did find out the true meaning of the verse, but, last week, especially last Tuesday, I found myself repeating the words time and time again. This was during and at the end of the first Test match between the West Indies and Pakistan at Sabina Park, during the “celebration” before a handful of fans at the 50th Test match played at Sabina Park without a Jamaican in the team, and during the match which Pakistan won by a whopping seven wickets with over half a day to spare, and after rain interfered with the game at various times. It was also during the Test in which captain Misbah-ul-Haq, age 43 or thereabout, who had hit 99 not out in the first innings, strolled to the wicket, immediately smashed two sixes off successive deliveries, one over long-off and one midwicket, and walked off the field. Once again, for the umpteenth time and for a long, long time, myself and a few other embarrassed and disappointed fans struggled to deal with the West Indies’ failure, for so long, to remove themselves, not only from the foot of the ladder in terms of ratings, or rankings, but that they have remained static as far as development is concerned. For some 20 years now, it has been the same thing day after day, Test match after Test match. As the West Indies prod along changing managers, coaches, captains, and players at a rate of almost every Test match, the coaches, the captains, and even young inexperienced players, like Jomel Warrican and Alzarri Joseph, talk about how good the team is and if only the players had batted well, had bowled well, and had fielded properly, things may have been different. They all end up with a belief, or so they say, that things will be better tomorrow. Tomorrow, however, has never come. Tomorrow, except for a very, very few occasions, has always been like the day before, or worse. Facts of life These players are not as good as the players earlier times, they are nowhere close to the players of yesterday. The players of today are too easily forgiven for their failures, at least, it appears so, and, on top of that, the players apparently believe that they are as good as those who played earlier Someone had better let them know the facts of life, and the facts of life include the following: the harder you work, the better you become, and the more you will be respected, and all that adds up to more money and to more honours. The great, immortal George Headley once said that everybody makes mistakes, but that the good ones, the good players, make them only twice. The West Indies batsmen, for example, make mistakes all the time. They get out doing the same things over and over again. What hurts more is that sometimes, whenever you see a West Indian batting in a regional game, or in a Test match, or even in the nets, and they bat for a few minutes, or play one or two delightful strokes, one would bet his last dollar that he can bat and is destined for the big time. Most times, if not all the time, one is left embarrassed by the very thought that he can bat whenever he comes to bat in a Test match, or against one or two good bowlers, and the faults, the chinks, become exposed. It is hard to blame the selectors for selecting them to represent the West Indies. Most times, it is “six a one, half a dozen of the other”, or it is simply a case of anyone will do. Right now, the selectors may feel, as many of us do, that the best thing to do is to put the names of the top-40 players or so in a bag and ask someone to draw the names of the 11 players from it.last_img read more

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Alora determined to finally beat Cambodian rival if they meet in AIMAG

first_imgMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’ A familiar face, though, could stand in her way once again with Cambodian Sorn Seavmey also in the competition and Alora is looking to turn in a different result if they meet.“Of course it still hurts,” said Alora in a round table discussion at College of St. Benilde on Thursday. “But I need to move on and keep fighting because I might face her once more.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“Right now, I want to beat her but the Aimag is bigger than the SEA Games and I want to get a podium finish.”Seavmey beat Elora 13-6 in the final of the women’s kyorugi -73 kilogram event marking the fourth straight time the Filipina lost to her Cambodian opponent. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Break new ground It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Learning about the ‘Ring of Fire’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. End of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legend Winning startcenter_img Rio Olympians Kirstie Alora (left) and Hidilyn Diaz during a roundtable discussion at College of St. Benilde. Photo by Bong LozadaFilipino jin Kirstie Alora said she still feels the pain of losing in the gold medal match in the 2017 Southeast Asian Games two games ago.But with new challenge coming up in the Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan from September 17-27, Alora is determined to leave her Malaysia frustrations behind.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LATEST STORIES OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson View comments A costly, catty dispute finally settled UAAP Season 80 Preview: New look, same goals for FEU Tamaraws Alora, who will stay in her weight division, said her disappointment in the SEA Games will be her motivation come the Aimag.“The Aimag is bigger than the SEA Games, and the loss was a learning experience for me.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more

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Federer advances to Australian Open semifinal against Chung

first_imgOSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew The 36-year-old Swiss star overcame a shaky start, dropping his opening service game and uncharacteristically challenging the chair umpire because of a technological fault, before winning 7-6 (1), 6-3, 6-4 on Wednesday night.“I had to get a bit lucky. A bit angry. A bit frustrating maybe at the umpire,” Federer said. “Anyway, glad to get out of that first set. It was key to the match.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkChung became the first Korean to make a Grand Slam tennis semifinal when he beat No. 97-ranked Tennys Sandgren 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-3 in the afternoon match on Rod Laver Arena.The 21-year-old Chung hadn’t let up when upsetting No. 4 Alexander Zverev or six-time Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic en route to the quarterfinals, but he let his guard down in the last game and needed six match points and to fend off two break points to hold off Sandgren. MOST READ Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Switzerland’s Roger Federer reaches for a backhand return to Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic during their quarterfinal at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)MELBOURNE, Australia — Roger Federer beat long-time rival Tomas Berdych to set up an Australian Open semifinal against Hyeon Chung, a champion of the so-called Next Generation.Defending champion Federer extended his winning streak to 14 in Australian Open quarterfinals and to nine in a personal duel with Berdych that dates to the 2004 Olympics. The 19-time major winner wins that head-to-head contest 20-6, including all five meetings at Melbourne Park.ADVERTISEMENT Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Nonito Donaire vs Naoya Inoue is BWAA 2019 Fight of the Year Almazan vows to comeback stronger after finals heartbreak Michael Porter Jr. stays patient as playing time increasescenter_img View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Newsome sets focus on helping Bolts open new PBA season on right track OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Back to dominant ways as Zark’s-Lyceum sticks to system “In last game, I think at 40-love … if I win one more point, I make history in Korea. I have to think about the ceremony, something,” he said, explaining how he got slightly ahead of himself. “After deuce, break point. I was like, no, nothing to do with ceremony. But just keep playing — keep focused.”Then he fully embraced the moment, joking in an on-court TV interview, introducing the audience to his parents and his coach, and taking the microphone to speak in Korean to millions of new tennis fans back home.“I think all the people is watching Australian Open now because we make history in Korea,” he said.The No. 58-ranked Chung is the lowest-ranked man to reach the Australian Open semifinals since Marat Safin in 2004. He’s also the youngest to reach the last four at a major since Marin Cilic did it here in 2010.With Chung already through, and Kyle Edmund playing No. 6 Cilic in the other half of the draw, it’s the first time since 1999 that multiple unseeded players have reached the Australian Open semifinals.ADVERTISEMENT Two women who’ve been to this stage at a Grand Slam before will meet in the last four. One has two major titles, the other still seeks a breakthrough. Top-ranked Simona Halep recovered from an early break to win nine straight games in a 6-3, 6-2 win over No. 6 Karolina Pliskova and set up a semifinal match against 2016 champion Angelique Kerber, who routed U.S. Open finalist Madison Keys 6-1, 6-2.Kerber has been the only Grand Slam singles champion in the women’s draw since her third-round win over Maria Sharapova. Two-time French Open finalist Halep has had a tougher road — having to save match points in a third-round win over Lauren Davis that finished 15-13 in the third — to reach the semifinals at Melbourne Park for the first time.Not that Chung’s run has been routine. His big wins of Zverev and Djokovic have drawn extra attention to a player who last November won the inaugural Next Generation title.He was too consistent for Sandgren, a 26-year-old American who had never won a match at a Grand Slam tournament or beaten a top 10 player until last week.Sandgren’s unexpected surge to the quarterfinals — he beat 2014 champion Stan Wawrinka and No. 5 Dominic Thiem en route to the quarterfinals — was overshadowed by heavy scrutiny of his Twitter account and his follows and retweets of far-right activists.Kerber has had no serious distractions on a 14-match winning streak, and is hoping to emulate her breakout year in 2016.She won the Australian and U.S. Open titles two years ago and reached the No. 1 ranking, but slipped into the 20s last year. She didn’t win a title between the 2016 U.S. Open and the Sydney International earlier this month.Seeded 21st, her first three wins were in straight sets but a fourth-round struggle against No. 88 Hsieh Su-wei had commentators wondering if Kerber was in 2016, or 2017 form.She responded with six service breaks against the No. 17-seeded Keys, finishing off the match in 51 minutes and improving her record to seven wins in eight matches against the American.“I am just trying to find the feeling back that I had, like 2016, and just enjoying my time,” Kerber said. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player awardlast_img read more

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