Christian Wade’s fastest men in rugby

first_img TAGS: Glasgow Warriors LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS John Bentley“When people ask me about electrifying wingers, my earliest memories were of John Bentley on the 1997 Lions tour to South Africa, he was tearing up! That individual try he scored against Gauteng was incredible. He slalomed his way past about half the side and went under the posts. He was very strong but he had superb evasive skills and the top end speed to finish. He had naughty wheels!”Charles Piutau“There are so many Southern Hemisphere speed merchants, you could go for Zac Guildford or Jonah Lomu, who could run a sub-11 second 100m but I’ll got for a player seen in the flesh, so it’s Charles Piutau, who plays on the wing or full-back for the Auckland Blues. I saw him out in Treviso for the Junior World Championship playing against Ireland and he pulled out some crazy skills, he can do anything on the pitch!”Christian Wade was speaking on behalf of HSBC at the Rosslyn Park HSBC National Schools Sevens. For more information visit www.rpns7.co.ukHSBC are also running Rugby Festivals around the world and we were with them when they took the game to the favelas of Brazil. Find out more in the latest issue of Rugby World Gas, wheels, juice, call it what you want. Speed is an ever more essential commodity for today’s players but who are the fastest men in rugby? We caught up with Christian Wade at the Rosslyn Park HSBC National Schools Sevens for his top picks…center_img It’s a question posed in every clubhouse, watering hole or playing field in the land. Who are the fastest men in world rugby? The players who leave others clasping at thin air. Well, we asked Christian Wade, no slouch himself, who the fastest men he’s seen on the rugby field are…Carlin Isles“Man, Carlin has to be the fastest across the turf. I think he’s been clocked at 10.18secs over 100, plus he’s straight off the track. I caught him when he was over for the World Club Sevens last year and since then we’ve had a few conversations on Twitter. He seems like a good guy. I’ll be watching his progress at Glasgow now he’s crossed to the 15-a-side code.”Tadzuka Ngwenya“It’s a shame Biarritz are going down, but Ngwenya has unbelievable wheels. It’s not just straight out speed though, he has good footwork and a lovely left-foot step. It’s like you know it’s coming but you can’t stop it. The way he smoked Bryan Habana playing for USA against the Springboks in 2007 was incredible, he backed himself. He did the same to Shane Williams gassing up the touchline for Biarritz against the Ospreys in 2008. Those are two serious scalps to have.”Shane Williams“In his pomp, Shane was virtually untouchable. He scored 59 tries at Test level, which is quite ridiculous. He was at his peak in 2008 where he won IRB Player of the Year, and after a great Six Nations, I remember seeing him score a try against South Africa, where picked up the ball up went down the touchline and turned the Springbok defence inside out before scoring in the corner. He had such good feet, a great player.” Wheels on fire: Christian Wade scorches in for Wasps against Gloucester, he’s on the road to recovery last_img read more

Autumn Tests 2014: End of series awards

first_img The ‘In the black’ Award – New ZealandThe marketeers at Adidas have their work cut out rebranding a black shirt, and this year they came up ‘the Blackest Shirt Ever’, whether it is, is a moot point, but Steve Hansen’s men are certainly in the black.Their four wins over the autumn Tests made it a remarkable 47 wins in 49 games. While they blew USA away, they had tougher Tests against England, Scotland and Wales but when it mattered, they delivered, most impressively against Wales, where like a boxer on the ropes, they huffed and puffed until 69 minutes before blitzing three tries to leave Wales seeing stars on the canvas. It was enthralling and cruel in equal measure. The All Blacks remain the team to beat.The ‘To The Manor Born’ Award – Robbie HenshawThe collective tears are still fresh in the minds of Ireland fans that the prodigal son, Brian O’Driscoll has finally unlaced his boots for the last time, and the hypothetical question that has been asked for years is finally being answered. Who can replace BOD? Well, Robbie Henshaw, that’s who.The Connacht No 13 – after receiving a text of encouragement from the great man – has looked error-proof since slotting in against South Africa. He was neat and tidy in heavy traffic and showed enough creative nous to promise better things. At just 21, Ireland may have found their long-term successor. Rumours of a move to Leinster have only confirmed his elevated standing.Thumbs up: Sam Warburton acknowledges the crowd after Wales’ win over South AfricaThe ‘W.C Fields’ Award – Wales“If at first you don’t succeed, try, try and try again.” That had become Wales’ mantra after 23 consecutive losses to the southern hemisphere big three. On nine occasions in the last three years they had contrived to lose by less than five points, often in the final ten minutes. Sam Warburton said it was a matter of ‘when’ not ‘if’ to an exasperated nation.Then came the World’s No 2, South Africa, a team they had beaten only once in 108 years. They won, not because of skill, wit, or guile, but because of grit, cohesion and heart and words cannot underestimate how important that result was.The ‘signs-of-life’ award – ScotlandScotland have been quietly beavering away in the last six months. Gone are the wacky soundbites of Scott Johnson and in, well, is the sound of silence from the ‘words are overrated’ form of taciturn Big Vern Cotter. Cotter is taking some of the basic principles of his Clermont side and fusing them with what is at his disposal with Scotland. Namely, doing the basics properly, and refining the edges of the rough diamonds in the Scotland squad.Tommy Seymour, Jonny Gray and Greig Laidlaw have all thrived under Cotter and collectively they scored 11 tries in three games so you’d wager them to inflict a metaphorical bloody nose or two in the Six Nations. Welcome back, Scotland!‘Star? So what?’: Teddy Thomas has quickly taken to Test rugbyA ‘star is born’ award – Teddy ThomasFrance have gone through wingers, like Jordan goes through husbands in recent years. The likes of Maxime Medard, Julien Malzieu and Benjamin Fall have come and gone but they finally look like they’ve stumbled across a fine pair. First Yoann Huget proved himself a player of distinction during the Six Nations, and then a 21-year-old from Biarritz, called Teddy Thomas, showed that much missed French commodity; flair.He crossed the whitewash four times in two games, with a hat-trick against Fiji and the best of the lot against Australia, where he snuck through a gap and stepped outside Nick Phipps to finish. A little schoolmasterly of Philippe Saint-Andre to drop him for the final game, for missing a training session, but expect him to be cutting a dash in the Six Nations. After four weeks of excitement, controversy and lashings of intrigue it’s time for a whimsical round-up of the 2014 autumn series The ‘Doghouse’ Award – Samoan Rugby UnionThe rugby world likes to pride itself on fairplay and equality, so it was collectively dismayed at the raw deal the Samoan rugby players were getting from their Union. Paid only £400-per-week on the recent autumn tour, they fairly argued for more transparency and fairer governance from their union. The SRU chairman, Tuilaepa Sa’ilele, who also happens to be their Prime Minister, was less than sympathetic.Meetings with World Rugby (formerly the IRB) were overlooked, and despite the backing of IRPA, Sa’ilele dismissed the players as ‘silly little boys who are showing off’. This patronising attitude beggars belief and should be held to account. Sadly the silence from the powers-that-be is deafening.The ‘reverting to type’ award – EnglandEngland have been trying to give themselves a new image as a free-flowing, devil-may-care outfit in recent years, with some success. However the chariot has been bereft of ideas this autumn and stalled, so they’ve gone back to basics and realised they’re better than most at them. Davey Wilson has destroyed looseheads, Dylan Hartley has found his jumpers, Dave Attwood sailed high at the lineout and Courtney Lawes has blitzed the tackle area and the much-maligned Chris Robshaw worked away at the breakdown with aplomb. That’s without mentioning ‘Big’ Ben Morgan who has owned the contact area. Why bother stepping outside 10-man rugby if you can win the old-fashioned way, eh?Shy and retiring: Michael Cheika does a fine line in ‘speaking his mind’The ‘can’t open the door properly’ award – Australian managementThe Australian management, under the shy and retiring Michael Cheika, have a nice line in excuses. After the Wallabies lost so narrowly to Ireland in Dublin, a door was mysteriously broken, with the repairs said to run into the thousands. So what could have happened?Had the gargantuan Will Skelton slipped and fell after a shower, or had Izzy Folau, while practicing taking high-balls and misjudged his landing, fine. Hell, if they were naughty they could even add it to the rap sheet of controversy-magnet Kurtley Beale. But no, they said one of the management had opened the door the wrong way. Pull. The. Other. One.The ‘Shooting themselves in the foot’ award – WRUBefore their hard-fought victory over South Africa, Wales needlessly heaped pressure on themselves with a series of avoidable gaffes. First there was the public admonishment of Richard Hibbard who after leaving the stadium in a moon boot had been called back to his club and ended up playing seven minutes of an Aviva Premiership match, before the ‘miscommunication’ was patched up.Then there was leak of the verbal ‘word in the ear’ of BBC over Sonja McLaughlan’s fully-justified questions. It was all too precious and defensive, and only compounded the pressure on Warren Gatland, who is a big boy and fully capable of looking after himself.Fallen away: Poor Jean de Villiers has a race to make the World CupThe ‘Fallen but not forgotten’ Award – Jean de VilliersA sad way to end our awards, but I think all of rugby will be hoping Jean de Villiers makes it back to full-fitness before the Rugby World Cup. In a miserable game-too-many for the Springboks, de Villiers dislocated his kneecap in the 58th minute and was stretchered off. What made it all the more upsetting is de Villiers only played one game in the 2007 tournament and missed 2011 through injury. The 108-cap South Africa roundly liked and respected within the game and everyone will be willing him back to full health before the September 18th kick-off.We wish him a speedy recovery.center_img Class of their own: The All Blacks continue to set the standards in Test rugby LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Robert Paparemborde

first_img TAGS: The Greatest Players Paparemborde died from cancer at the age of just 52 in April 2001, leaving his wife Valerie, son Pierre and daughters France and Elsa.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers click here and find out how to download the digital edition here. Rated alongside Graham Price as “undoubtedly the greatest tighthead prop of the modern era” by another legend of the front row, Fran Cotton, Robert Paparemborde anchored a French pack which won three Five Nations titles, including Grand Slams in 1977 and 1981.Known as the Bear of the Pyrenees, or Patou (which translates as a big, friendly dog), this stalwart of the Pau club didn’t make his Test debut until he was 27 but was France’s most-capped prop on his retirement and set a record for scoring tries from that position too.Respected French coach Daniel Herrero credits Paparemborde with inventing modern prop play. He was mobile but more famously used his terrific strength to devastating effect in the scrum. “He was massively strong and powerful and had those incredible sloping shoulders that made him so difficult to scrummage against,” recalls Cotton.A judo black belt, he was a popular character who fellow prop Gerard Cholley credits as being the focal point of the France team in that era. He captained les Bleus five times. Another comrade from that pack, Jean-Pierre Bastiat, says: “He was the most accomplished prop I ever saw.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Major teams: Pau, RacingCountry: FranceTest span: 1975-83Test caps: 55 (55 starts)Test points: 32 (8T) France centre Roland Bertranne remembers Paparemborde asking the whole team to help choose a name for his daughter who was born on the day of a Test match, and they named her France.Having spent most of his career with Pau, he switched to Racing Club in Paris for the final year, then coached them to the French title in 1990. He was also vice-president of the French Federation, while away from rugby he was a shopkeeper, a bar owner and a local councillor in Pau.last_img read more

Past Rugby World Cup Hosts

first_img Rugby World Cup Greatest Players Rugby World Cup Groups Expand Past Rugby World Cup HostsThe Rugby World Cup tournament is in Japan and Asia for the first time in 2019, but where has the tournament been hosted in the past? We take a look at the past eight Rugby World Cup host nations in this piece, of course starting in 1987 and Australia and New Zealand.Past Rugby World Cup Hosts1987 in Australia and New ZealandThe inaugural tournament was co-hosted by two countries with New Zealand hosting 17 pool stage matches, two quarter-finals, third-place playoff and the final, and Australia hosting seven pool matches, two quarter-finals and both semi-finals. 16 teams competed in the tournament with New Zealand emerging victorious.1991 in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, FranceFour years on the tournament was held in the northern hemisphere for the first time by the five nations competing in the Five Nations Championship. In Pool 1 (England’s group), all the matches were hosted in stadiums in England – Twickenham, Cross Green, Welford Road or Kingsholm.In Pool 2 (Scotland and Ireland’s group) the matches were held in Murrayfield, Lansdowne Road or Ravenhill in Belfast. Pool 3 (Wales’ group) saw all the matches take place in Wales and the same can be said for Pool 4 and France.The knockout rounds took place across the five nations with Twickenham hosting the final which saw Australia win over home favourites England.1995 in South AfricaSpringboks Lair: South Africa would hoist the trophy in Ellis Park in 1995 (Getty Images)The Rugby World Cup then headed to Africa. After the end of apartheid this was to be the first major sports tournament to take place in South Africa. Ellis Park, Newlands, Loftus Versfeld and Kings Park were just some of the huge stadiums to host games.The hosts would go on to win the tournament too, beating New Zealand in the final.1999 in Wales, England, France, Scotland, Ireland Like the 1991 tournament, the 1999 edition would be held by the countries of the Five Nations, this time Wales would act as the principal host though as they got the opening ceremony, first match and final. Pretty much most of the other matches took place in the other four nations.There were also more teams this time around as the tournament was expanded from 16 teams to 20 however the usual suspects competed for the title. Again, like eight years previously, the Australians won their second World Cup.2003 in Australia Rugby World Cup Greatest Players This tournament was supposed to resemble the 1987 event, with Australia and New Zealand hosting matches. However the entire tournament was shifted to Australia by itself when their was a contractual despite between the New Zealand Rugby Union and Rugby World Cup Limited.Australia would again have a good tournament, beating their rivals New Zealand and getting to the final. However they would lose to England in extra-time.2007 in FranceStade de France: The iconic stadium hosted the 2007 final (Getty Images)France won the right to host the 2007 tournament beating out England and hosted pretty much all the games in 12 stadiums across France – four were played in Cardiff and two in Edinburgh.Despite beating New Zealand, France lost to England in the semi-finals who then went on to lose narrowly to South Africa.2011 in New ZealandThe pressure intensified as the tournament went back to New Zealand in 2011, as the island nation beat out bids from Japan and South Africa to host. The All Blacks had not won a tournament since the first one in 1987 so the entire country expected Richie McCaw and co to lead them to victory.That’s exactly what happened as they beat their nemesis France 8-7 in the final.2015 in EnglandAgain Japan and South Africa lost out on hosting the tournament in 2015, as did Italy. This time England secured the event and the team responded by becoming the first one to fail to make it out of the group stages. New Zealand would become the first team to retain the Rugby World Cup and the first team to win it three times. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby World Cup Greatest Shocks A rundown of the Rugby World Cup groups… We take a look at the past countries to have hosted the tournament. Adam Hathaway takes a look at the best… Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Owain Jones looks at eight of the biggest… Rugby World Cup Greatest Shocks Expand Expand Rugby World Cup Groups Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… Past Hosts: We look at the eight previous tournament hosts (Getty Images) 2019 in JapanThe tournament heads to Japan and Asia for the first time. Who do you think will come out on top this year?Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features.  Collapse Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, and Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

James Cronin given one-month doping ban after pharmacy mix-up

first_img James Cronin given one-month doping ban after pharmacy mix-upA bizarre mix-up has led to Munster prop James Cronin being handed a one-month ban for an unintentional anti-doping violation.The three-cap Ireland loosehead failed a test in the wake of Munster’s European Champions Cup game against Racing in November, with banned substances prednisolone and prednisone showing up in his system.However, it has since been found that the breach was due to a “dispensing error” at the pharmacy.Following an investigation by European Professional Club Rugby, independent judicial officer Antony Davies put out a statement clarifying: “Prior to the match against Racing 92, Cronin had been unwell and had been prescribed antibiotics, however, the pharmacy dispensed medication to him which was intended for another customer.CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT HOW TO DOWNLOAD THE DIGITAL EDITION OF RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE“The judicial officer accepted evidence that the banned substances in the player’s sample were due to a dispensing error by the pharmacy and that the anti-doping violation was entirely unintentional.“Although the judicial officer found that there was no significant fault on behalf of the player, and that there were clear and compelling mitigating factors, he determined that the player had to bear some responsibility for what was in his sample. “It was therefore decided that Cronin will be ineligible for a one-month period from 15 April 2020 until 16 May 2020.”Hard running: Cronin in action earlier in the season (Getty Images)We do not yet know when the rugby season will resume or when the next potential competitive match will take place.As is standard procedure, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) will review the written judgment before choosing to file an appeal or not.In response to the news, Munster CEO Ian Flanagan said: “This has been an extremely challenging time for James and the province, and we are glad it has reached its conclusion.  We have treated this matter with the utmost seriousness, and as always Munster Rugby and Irish Rugby are fully supportive of all Sporting Ireland, WADA and World Rugby anti-doping policies.“In protecting the integrity of our player, the organisation, and the sport, I can assure you that this unintentional anti-doping rule violation is as a result of exceptional circumstances due to a third-party dispensing error by a pharmacy. Clearly the sanction is reflective of the strong mitigating factors in this case, and we look forward to James’ return to action.” Big mix up: Munster prop James Cronin (Getty Images) The prop failed a test after Munster’s Champions Cup game against Racing in Novembercenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Autumn Nations Cup Wales v England preview

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England have kept changes to the bare minimum. Ollie Lawrence’s hip injury meant a change in midfield was guaranteed, but George Ford was always likely to return anyway after recovering from an achilles injury. The Tiger comes back in at ten, with Owen Farrell shifting to 12 alongside Henry Slade – a centre pairing last seen on the 2018 South Africa tour.The rest of the side is unchanged but there is movement on the bench. Wing Anthony Watson (ankle) and hooker Luke Cowan-Dickie (knee) return from injury as ‘finishers’ and there’s a place too for Jack Willis. The back-row had a strong debut against Georgia two weeks ago and then returned to Wasps to win Match of the Match plaudits against Bristol last Sunday.Fit and raring: Luke Cowan-Dickie goes through his paces at England training this week (Getty Images)What have the coaches said?Wales head coach Wayne Pivac: “Saturday is another great opportunity for us and for this squad. It’s another chance for us to take what we’ve been doing in training into match day.“We’re looking forward it. We know what we need to do and we are focused on that.”On Wales’ injuries: “It’s unfortunate but it’s going to create opportunities for others and in the loose forwards, it’s young James Botham and Shane Lewis-Hughes.“They’re a couple of guys with big futures and we’re going to get the questions about them asked in this particular match. We’re up against a very strong England team, who are going to bring a lot of intensity. What a match for these guys to be tested in.” Back at ten: George Ford looks on during England’s Six Nations win against Wales in March (Getty Images) An air of pessimism pervades in Wales as they welcome in-form England to Llanelli in round three of the competition. No doubting who the favourites are for this one… Autumn Nations Cup Wales v England previewOn the surface, this Saturday’s Autumn Nations Cup match at Parc y Scarlets is a lopsided contest (4pm). Wales, ranked ninth in the world, are in an apparent state of flux having lost six in a row before stopping the rot last weekend against more lowly opponents in Georgia.In contrast, England, second in the world, are on a six-match winning streak that includes a 246-tackle defensive masterclass last week against Ireland.Rugby World analyst Sean Holley captured the mood of the Welsh nation when speaking on Scrum V. “We’re lacking a bit of ball carrying, X-factor, we seem to be running into brick walls,” said the former Ospreys and Bristol coach.“We’re struggling at the contact area, giving penalties away or the ball is being slowed up. With that (set-piece) platform against Georgia you would expect us to score more points.”The pall of gloom would lift instantly should Wales spring an upset this weekend with a side featuring only eight of the 23-man squad on duty for the defeat at Twickenham last March. The likes of Shane Lewis-Hughes, James Botham, Johnny Williams and Louis Rees-Zammit embody a new generation for Wales.Young blood: Wales flanker James Botham carries during the 18-0 win against Georgia (Getty Images)England will hope to pummel them into the ground, a message reinforced by their choice of six forwards on the bench. Many is the time they have crossed Offa’s Dyke with high hopes and returned smarting from defeat. They lost twice in Cardiff last year but this time will benefit from the empty stands at the home of the Scarlets.DID YOU KNOW? England’s only previous Test in Llanelli was a 0-0 draw in 1887England appear to hold the advantage in any area you care to mention. As Ugo Monye pointed out, people often don’t factor in emotion when appraising likely outcomes. Yet the former England wing added: “It’s hard to look past an England victory. Their set-piece, their defence and their tactical delivery is so much better that they will find a way to win.”Welcome back: some England fans will return in December (Indigo/Getty)In terms of the competition context, a point will suffice for England to clinch top spot in Pool A and so advance to the Autumn Nations Cup final.England’s last match of the tournament takes place at Twickenham on 6 December and will see spectators admitted following new rulings. Sports events in London, a Tier Two area, can host up to 2,000 fans and the RFU will gift 400 seats to NHS workers. Six hundred tickets will go to players’ families, local rugby clubs and sponsors, while 1,000 tickets will be sold.An emphatic defeat would pile the pressure on new Wales coach Wayne Pivac, but people should remember that even the greatest coaches endure sticky patches. Eddie Jones presided over five successive defeats just two years ago, while Wales lost eight in a row on Warren Gatland’s watch in 2012-13 – just before they won the 2013 Six Nations. It’s a fickle old business.The teams’ last meeting was an eventful affair just before the first lockdown. England racked up a big lead before two late tries – after cards for Ellis Genge and Manu Tuilagi – produced a somewhat misleading 33-30 scoreline. Watch highlights of that Six Nations match here.What’s the big team news?Wales make eight changes, not all of them expected. Liam Williams has a “nasty facial injury” and drops out to accommodate goalkicking ace Leigh Halfpenny. Lloyd Williams makes his first start for four years and his first against a European nation. And who would have predicted a back row of Lewis-Hughes, Botham and Toby Faletau when this season started?In fact, only five of the XV started against England in March: Halfpenny, Biggar, Nick Tompkins and the two locks, Jake Ball and Alun Wyn Jones. Halfpenny and scrum-half Williams are the only members of the back division who haven’t played domestically in England, an indication of Pivac’s increasing interest in drawing on the Gallagher Premiership.Absent players include three frontline back-rowers: Justin Tipuric took a knock to the head from Beka Saginadze last weekend, Josh Navidi also has concussion issues and Ross Moriarty continues to be thwarted by an ankle injury. On the half-backs: “Lloyd has come in and done everything that has been asked. It’s been about speed to the breakdown. When he’s been on the park, we’ve played some of our best rugby, so he gets an opportunity there.“We looked closely at what we’re doing at ten. We’re going to give both guys (Dan Biggar and Callum Sheedy) a chunk of game time. Callum will get out there for a decent part of the second half to see how he goes in this company.”England head coach Eddie Jones: Jones said: “We’re expecting another tough match, and at the home of Welsh rugby where the heart and soul of their game is.“Twelve months ago Wales were Grand Slam champions and three points from a World Cup final, so we know what they are capable of.“We’ve picked the best 23 players for the battle and we’re looking forward to it greatly.”Game time assured: Callum Sheedy, pictured on his debut, will come on for his third Wales cap (Sportsfile)Any interesting statistics?* Wales have lost eight of the previous 11 fixtures with England. But they’ve beaten them on their two previous visits to the Principality, both in 2019* England have the best tackle success rate so far in the Autumn Nations Cup, at 93%. Wales are the only other side above 90%* Jonny May’s brace last week has put him joint second in England’s all-time try-scoring list. His three tries against Wales have all been scored at Twickenham* England have the best lineout success in the competition (97%, 35/35). Wales have the poorest rate (71%, 20/28)* No 8 Billy Vunipola tops the Autumn Nations Cup tackle chart. He’s made 34 tackles to go with a team-high 21 carries for England* Wales have nilled two teams this year – Italy (42-0) in the Six Nations and Georgia (18-0) last weekend. Only on two other occasions in the professional era – against Japan and Fiji – have they kept an opponent scoreless* Alun Wyn Jones has played 21 consecutive Tests against England – the most by a Welshman against a single opponent* At 19 years 293 days, Louis Rees-Zammit last week became the youngest Wales try-scorer since Harry Robinson against the Barbarians in 2012Impact: Billy Vunipola has stamped his mark on the Autumn Nations Cup on both sides of the ball (Getty)What time does it kick off and is it on TV?Wales v England, Saturday 28 November, Parc y ScarletsThe match kicks off at 4pm and will be live on Amazon Prime, S4C and Premier Sports (Ireland). There is commentary on BBC Radio 5 Live Sports Extra and BBC Radio Wales.If you’re outside the UK and Ireland, check out our guide to Autumn Nations Cup coverage around the world.Holding the whistle is Romain Poite, whom Joe Marler calls his favourite referee and names in his Fantasy Drinking team because he’s “laid-back and chilled” and loves a glass of wine.Related content: Best Rugby Books of 2020Poite’s French compatriots Alex Ruiz and Pascal Gauzere are the assistant referees while Ireland’s Brian MacNeice is the TMO.The stage is set: Scarlets’ home Parc y Scarlets, which stages its third International on Saturday (Inpho)What are the line-ups?Wales: Leigh Halfpenny; Louis Rees-Zammit, Nick Tompkins, Johnny Williams, Josh Adams; Dan Biggar, Lloyd Williams; Wyn Jones, Ryan Elias, Samson Lee, Jake Ball, Alun Wyn Jones (capt), Shane Lewis-Hughes, James Botham, Taulupe Faletau.Replacements: 16 Elliot Dee, 17 Rhys Carre, 18 Tomas Francis, 19 Will Rowlands, 20 Aaron Wainwright, 21 Rhys Webb, 22 Callum Sheedy, 23 Owen Watkin.England: Elliot Daly; Jonathan Joseph, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell, Jonny May; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Joe Launchbury, Tom Curry, Sam Underhill, Billy Vunipola.Replacements: 16 Luke Cowan-Dickie, 17 Ellis Genge, 18 Will Stuart, 19 Jonny Hill, 20 Ben Earl, 21 Jack Willis, 22 Dan Robson, 23 Anthony Watson. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Lions and Premiership reach agreement on player release

first_imgHowever, English clubs warn that they won’t do the same for future tours Lions and Premiership reach agreement on player releaseFirst the good news. The British & Irish Lions have reached an agreement with Premiership Rugby over the release of players based at English clubs.The release row has been going on for months, with the Premiership unhappy with the scheduling of a pre-tour fixture between the Lions and Japan at BT Murrayfield on the same day as the Gallagher Premiership final, Saturday 26 June.Lions coach Warren Gatland was concerned that England-based players who were not involved in the final – ie those whose season ended either on 12 June or after the semi-finals on 19-20 June – would not be available until after the league’s climax.However, a deal has now been done, with a Premiership Rugby spokesperson saying: “An agreement has been reached for the release of all players at the conclusion of their domestic commitments for the Lions’ warm-up game against Japan. They will also be available for any training camp ahead of that fixture.” Lions chairman Jason Leonard said: “We are very grateful to Premiership Rugby and PRO14 for the release of players after they have concluded their domestic commitments. In particular we would like to thank Phil Winstanley for his diligence in helping us reach an agreement.” The British & Irish Lions line up on the 2017 tour to New Zealand (Sportsfile/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Warning over future Lions toursNow for the bad news. While player release has been agreed for this tour, with the Lions paying English clubs a compensation fee, Premiership Rugby has warned that there will be no such deal for future tours, such as the next trip to Australia in 2025.The Premiership Rugby spokesperson said: “This discussion was never just about money. Premiership clubs are at the very heart of English rugby – helping to nurture the pipeline of talent which supports the international game and future Lions Tours. It is essential that we are properly consulted – and our position respected – when fixtures are scheduled which impact the domestic season.“The Lions warm-up match against Japan falls outside of the World Rugby Regulation 9 window for release of players for international rugby, which is in breach of what was agreed in San Francisco in 2017. The Japan game also clashes with the highlight of our season, the Premiership final.“For future Lions tours, Premiership Rugby will not release players until after the Premiership final. We will continue to honour our commitments around player release, under Regulation 9, and encourage all parties in rugby to work more closely to avoid situations like this happening in the future.”It was only a few weeks ago that Scotland had to pay a significant sum for the release of Premiership players for their rearranged Six Nations fixture against France and club-versus-country rows seem set to dominate the rugby landscape for some time yet.last_img read more

Joshua Ashton Hill ordained to serve Episcopal School of Knoxville

first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Joshua Ashton Hill ordained to serve Episcopal School of Knoxville Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop George Young, along with other clergy members from the East Tennessee and surrounding areas, lays his hands on the Rev. Joshua Ashton Hill during the service. Photo: Episcopal School of Knoxville[Episcopal School of Knoxville press release] The Rt. Rev. George D. Young III, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of East Tennessee, presided over the ordination of the Rev. Joshua Ashton Hill to the sacred order of the priests on Aug. 27 at The Episcopal School of Knoxville.“It was incredibly special to be surrounded by so many friends — young and old — who have walked by my side during different stages of my journey towards this day,” Hill said. “The love was thick.”Nearly 40 clergy from East Tennessee and surrounding areas, along with family and friends of Hill and parents and supporters of ESK, were in attendance for the ordination.The service, although typically held in a cathedral setting, was hosted in the school’s Kline Gymnasium. The students attended the service as well as participating as both readers and special music. According to the Rev. Daniel Heischman, executive director of the National Association of Episcopal Schools, Hill’s ordination was one of only a handful he can remember taking place at a school.“ESK was honored to host such a significant event in the ministry and life of Father Josh,” ESK Headmaster Jay Secor said. “Not only did today allow us to celebrate with Josh and his family but it gave our students the opportunity to share in the celebration of the day.”Episcopal School of Knoxville students serve as acolytes for the ordination service. Front Row (L-R) Alex Carter, Parker Jones, McLean Stooksberry, Hallie Longest, Back Row (L-R) Andrew Natter, Zach Stivers, Josh Hill, Addison Jones.A native of Seymour, Tennessee, Hill graduated from Yale Divinity School with the Master of Divinity degree in 2009, when he also completed a certificate of Anglican studies from Berkeley Divinity School, the Episcopal seminary at Yale. He holds a bachelor’s degree in religion from Emory and Henry College. Hill spent three years as director of youth and children’s ministry at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in New Canaan, Connecticut. He was ordained as a deacon in the Episcopal Church this past January.Hill and his wife Hannah have two daughters, Elana and Maya. He is a graduate of Seymour High School and his parents, Keith and Vickie Hill, still reside in Tennessee.Hill serves as the chaplain at ESK with duties that include teaching religion and ethics, conducting daily chapel services for all Lower and Middle School students and overseeing community service at ESK at all grade levels. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Posted Aug 28, 2013 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel People Director of Music Morristown, NJcenter_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

RIP: Requiem set for retired Pennsylvania Bishop Suffragan Franklin Turner

first_imgRIP: Requiem set for retired Pennsylvania Bishop Suffragan Franklin Turner TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Rev. Dr. Raleigh Daniel Hairston says: Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rev. David Madsen says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN [Episcopal News Service] A requiem Eucharist for retired Diocese of Pennsylvania Bishop Suffragan Franklin Delton Turner is set for Jan. 11 at the Philadelphia Episcopal Cathedral.Turner, 80, died on the afternoon of New Year’s Eve in Philadelphia.Turner, a former staff officer for black ministries at the Episcopal Church Center in New York from 1972-1983, was assistant to then Bishop of Pennsylvania Allen Bartlett in 1988 when he was elected suffragan bishop for that diocese.Out of some 900 men who had up to that point in time been elected bishop in the Episcopal Church, Turner was approximately the 27th black priest elected. He was also the first black bishop of the then-205-year-old diocese. A total of nine candidates were in the running, including the Rev. Nancy Van Dyke Platt of Maine who, if elected, would have been the first woman bishop in the Anglican Communion (that distinction fell in early 1989 to the Rt. Rev. Barbara Harris).Newly consecrated Bishop Suffragan of Pennsylvania Bishop Franklin D. Turner, left, receives his crosier, a gift from Mityana diocese in Uganda, from Pennsylvania diocesan Bishop Allen L. Bartlett, right center. Co-consecrator, Bishop John D. Walker of Washington, is at left center. The Very Rev. Thomas L. McClellan, right, was master-of-ceremonies at the Oct. 7, 1988, consecration. Photo: Archives of the Episcopal ChurchSpeaking in Nov. 6, 1992, at St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Philadelphia during a service to rebury the remains of Absalom Jones — the first African-American ordained a priest in the Episcopal Church — nearly 200 years after his death, Turner said that “we have indeed come this far by faith.”“We can be justly proud of our sojourn in the Episcopal Church, although it has been an uphill struggle,” he said.Turner officially retired as suffragan in 2000 and also served the diocese as an assisting bishop.Turner was born in Norwood, North Carolina, on July 19, 1933. He earned his A.B. degree from Livingstone College and his S.T.B. degree from Berkeley Divinity School (from which he also held a D.D. degree); he pursued further graduate study at General Theological Seminary. He was ordained deacon, and later priest, in 1965. Turner was vicar of the Church of the Epiphany in Dallas (1965-1966) and rector of St. George’s Church in Washington, D.C. (1966-1972).While in Washington, D.C., he founded the Washington Episcopal Clergy Association. He was also on the board of directors for the Kanuga Conference Center, and was a trustee of Berkeley Divinity School. Turner founded the Organization of Black Episcopal Seminarians. He was also the editor of the hymnal Lift Every Voice and Sing I. He served on the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council.At the Jan. 11 requiem, Bartlett will preside and be assisted by Pennsylvania Bishop Provisional Clifton Daniel III. The Rev. Harold T. Lewis, rector of Calvary Church, Pittsburgh, who succeeded Turner at the Church Center, will preach.Turner is survived by his wife, Barbara, and their children. House of Bishops, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By ENS staffPosted Jan 3, 2014 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments (3) Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rick Britton says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Hopkinsville, KY center_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI People Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA February 8, 2014 at 1:26 pm During my first cure in Essington, PA (SE suburb of Philly), Bishop Turner made a diocesan visit to our parish. On that day the Bishop baptized several children and prayed over a group of candidates during Confirmation. At the end of the service he asked if anyone had a testimony (something that they would like to thank God for and tell others what was going on in their lives). He later encouraged me to continue that practice, and I have. I don’t always, but when I do I am always thankful for that advice. People should have the opportunity to give thanks in public for what God is doing in their lives. I will always have fond memories of the gentle giant, the Rt. Rev. Franklin D. Turner Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK January 4, 2014 at 6:36 pm Bishop Turner was one of my mentors as a priest in the Episcopal Church and offered support during my years in seminary when he was director of Episcopal Black Ministries. Thanks be to God for his life and ministry. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest January 10, 2014 at 1:50 pm It was with profound sadness that I received the news of the passing of the Rt. Rev. Franklin Turner. This brought back many memories of our times as students together in l954 at Livingstone College where we were members of the Hood Seminary pre- theological Union. In the College he was a sophmore, and a spanish studies student, and there I served as the freshman class president. Like myself he left membership in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, and was confirmed in the Episcopal Church. After college graduation he went on to seminary and ordination, while I studied and pursued a career in social work ,and later attended and graduated from Bexley Hall and Colgate Rochester Divinity and School, and wound up as a “worker priest” in the Washington,DC area where we caught up with one another again. By this time Frank was very much involved in the life of the church, particularly related to black church minorities affairs, and other social justice issues, within the church and society. His election to the episcoporate helped to open up the doors for many other minorities, both blacks and females, in particular, to follow him in that office in the life of our church. His work at the Black desk was significant, and helpful to many, in the several ways in which he served in the local and larger life of our Anglican-Episcopal Church. It is good to see the preacher at his service as the Rev, Dr. Harold T. Lewis, Canon and Rector of Calvary Church, Pittsburgh, another illuminate bright star, and a hero of faith, in his continuing work, and witness in our Church. Also the Rt. Rev. Clifton Daniel, III, who served excellently, and was my diocesan bishop, in the diocese of East Carolina, prior to my retirement as Rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Wilmington, NC, and also prior to his present work as provisional bishop of Pensylvania. May the soul of my dear departed brother, the Rt. Reverend Franklin D. Turner, rest in peace and someday rise in glory with our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen! Also my sister, Gaynell Hairston Gunn, known to Bishop Turner’s wife, through connections at Bluefield State College, Bluefield, West Virginia, joins me in extending deepest sympathy to the family, and know that our prayers are with you always. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Obituary, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed.last_img read more

Michael Battle appointed GTS professor, director of Tutu Center

first_imgMichael Battle appointed GTS professor, director of Tutu Center Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Posted May 15, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [General Theological Seminary press release] The General Theological Seminary has announced that the Very Rev. Michael Battle, Ph.D., has been appointed as the Herbert Thompson Professor of Church and Society. He will also assume the position of Director of The Desmond Tutu Center. As its new Director, Battle holds a unique connection to The Desmond Tutu Center, having lived in residence with Archbishop Desmond Tutu in South Africa for two years (1993-1994) and being ordained a priest in South Africa by Archbishop Tutu in 1993. He also presented the 2008 Paddock Lectures in the Tutu Center at General Seminary on the concept of Ubuntu, an African concept central to Archbishop Tutu’s worldview.Battle served most recently as Interim Dean of Students and Community Life at the Episcopal Divinity School. He has served as Vicar or Rector at: St. Titus Episcopal Church, Durham, North Carolina; Church of Our Saviour, San Gabriel, California; and St. Ambrose Episcopal Church, Raleigh, North Carolina. He also served as the interim rector or as an associate priest with other churches in North Carolina and in Cape Town, South Africa. As part of some of his placements, he worked at churches located in ethnically changing neighborhoods to help them adapt and grow. Battle also has served as Provost and Canon Theologian for the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. In 2010, he was given one of the highest Anglican Church distinctions as “Six Preacher,” by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams. A distinction that goes back to 16th century England and Thomas Cranmer and is only given to a few who demonstrate great dedication to the Church.Battle received his undergraduate degree from Duke University, and holds a M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary and an S.T.M. from Yale University. He received his Ph.D. in Theology and Ethics also from Duke University. His academic experience includes service as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Vice President and Associate Professor of Theology at Virginia Theological Seminary; Associate Professor of Spirituality and Black Church Studies at Duke University’s Divinity School; and Assistant Professor of Spiritual and Moral Theology in the School of Theology at the University of the South. He has published nine books, including Reconciliation: the Ubuntu Theology of Desmond Tutu and the book for The Episcopal Church’s General Convention, Ubuntu: I in You and You in Me.As part of his many roles in the Church, Battle has served as chaplain to: Archbishop Tutu, Congressman John Lewis, the House of Bishops, and, in 2008, he was chaplain to the Lambeth Conference of Anglican Bishops. He is a featured keynote speaker and has led numerous clergy and lay retreats, including the bishops’ retreat of the Province of the West Indies. In addition, Battle has served as vice president to the Institute for Nonviolence.Battle has kept close ties with Archbishop Desmond Tutu and has written about his studies and friendship with the archbishop in his books. Battle and his wife, Raquel, were married by Archbishop Tutu, and their two daughters, Sage and Bliss, and son, Zion, were all baptized by him as well.The Rev. Dr. Robert J. Owens, Professor of Old Testament, says Battle “will bring to General Seminary an impressive combination of theological scholarship, pastoral ministry, international and cross-cultural service in the Anglican communion, as well as his striking success as a teacher in some of the Episcopal Church’s leading seminaries. I think our students will be greatly blessed as they encounter his theological mind, his pastor’s heart, and his hopefulness for the church as a community of justice.”Battle will begin his new position at General Seminary in fall 2015 and will teach Ethics and will lead the Graduate Anglican Seminar, as well as  intensive courses that will be offered, for credit or audit, through The Desmond Tutu Center. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (1) Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA May 16, 2015 at 11:02 am Excellent! blessings abound for Michael and for General and the church. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME People, Submit an Event Listing The Rev. Harriet B. Linville says: Theological Education Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more