4th murder in Arizona linked to spree that began with killing of prominent forensic psychologist: Sources

first_imgABC News(PHOENIX) — The fourth murder in a string of killings that began with the shooting of prominent forensic psychologist Steven Pitt in Phoenix has now been linked to the first three, law enforcement officials told ABC News.Pitt, who consulted with law enforcement on a handful of prominent cases, including the JonBenet Ramsey murder and the Jodi Arias trial, was shot and killed outside his office in Phoenix on Thursday night. An eyewitness said he heard Pitt loudly arguing with someone followed by gunshots, according to police.Law enforcement officials told ABC News on Sunday that this person is the only known eyewitness to any of the murders. The suspect was described by police as a white man wearing a black cap with a short brim.Scottsdale police had already connected the Friday afternoon killings of paralegals Veleria Sharp, 48, and Laura Anderson, 49, to the same suspect.The murder of Marshall Levine, who was killed just after midnight Saturday in Scottsdale, Arizona, has now been linked to the same gun used in all four murders, law enforcement officials told ABC News.The sources said the motive in the four killings remains unclear, but this is likely “family related.” The law enforcement officials said they have a bead on a “couple” of possible suspects.Levine’s ex-wife, Carol Kleinman, told ABC News that Levine was a psychiatrist, but was only licensed to practice in New Jersey.Since moving to Arizona, Kleinman said Levine worked as a life coach and hypnotherapist and dealt with clients who often “are angry.”Levine’s body was discovered by an acquaintance inside of his Scottsdale office in a neighborhood known as The Greens at Gainey Ranch — about 17 minutes from where the paralegals were shot.Law enforcement officials told ABC News on Sunday that one of the two paralegals actually crawled to a limo bus after being shot and alerted the driver, who called police. Police followed the trail of blood left by that woman to find the other, shot to death in the pair’s law office.“We are confident that both crime scenes are related,” Phoenix Police Department spokesman Sgt. Vince Lewis Lewis said Saturday of the shootings of Pitt and the two paralegals.Steven Pitt & Associates is headquartered in Phoenix, but Pitt worked on a number of nationally known cases, including Ramsey’s murder. The murder of the 6-year-old beauty pageant competitor who was found dead in the basement of her family’s home in Boulder, Colorado, has never been solved. Pitt was brought on in February 1997 to help develop a psychological profile of Ramsey’s parents, according to multiple reports at the time.Pitt also consulted on cases including the Columbine High School massacre, Kobe Bryant’s sexual assault case and the Phoenix serial killer known as the “Baseline Killer,” who was sentenced to death for murdering nine people in 2005 and 2006.No connection has been publicly announced between Pitt and the two paralegals or Levine.A $21,000 reward was being offered for an arrest and conviction in the four murders.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

NJ Transit police officer under investigation after video shows him allegedly dragging and punching man outside Trenton station

first_imgWPVI(TRENTON, N.J.) — A cellphone video apparently showing a New Jersey Transit Police officer dragging and hitting a semiconscious man outside a train station in Trenton over the weekend has prompted an internal investigation by the agency, officials said.“I can only attest to what I saw and what I saw wasn’t warranted,” the woman who took the video told ABC station WPVI-TV in Philadelphia.The woman, who requested anonymity, said the troubling incident occurred around 10:30 p.m. on Saturday outside the Trenton Transit Center.The woman, of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, said she was waiting for a ride outside the train station when she heard a commotion and then started filming the encounter with a cellphone. She said she first noticed the man sitting against a wall outside the station just before the encounter with the transit officer occurred.“There was no resisting … he wasn’t even speaking,” the woman said of the man who she says appeared to be passed out when the officer showed up.The video captures the officer, whose name has not been released, yelling at the man, who is seen collapsed on the sidewalk outside the entrance doors to the station.“Get up and get out now!” the officer is heard telling the man.When the man didn’t move for about 30 seconds, the officer allegedly grabbed him again by the hood of his sweatshirt and dragged him a few feet toward the curb before throwing him to the ground.The officer is then seen dragging the man a few feet further by his sweatshirt before apparently throwing him face-first onto the pavement and allegedly hitting him in the head, according to the video.Jim Smith, a New Jersey Transit spokesman, said the officer in the video has been identified and placed on administrative suspension, pending the outcome of an investigation.“The matter is currently under investigation with the New Jersey Transit Police Department Internal Affairs,” Smith told ABC News on Monday.It was unclear if the man seen allegedly being roughed up by the officer has been identified.“That’s all part of the investigation,” Smith said.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

2-year-old girl found alive after going missing from campsite in northern Michigan

first_imgMichigan State Police(MONROE, Mich.) — A 2-year-old girl was found alive Tuesday morning, one day after she went missing while on a family camping trip in northern Michigan, authorities said.Gabriella Roselynn Vitale was reported missing on Monday, launching an urgent, overnight search.Over 50 searchers and 10 canines were looking for the little girl Tuesday morning before Michigan State Police announced that she had been found.Gabriella’s family had told the Oscoda County Sheriff’s Office and Michigan State Police that they had been camping in a wooded area for a few days and were getting ready to leave Monday morning when they noticed that the toddler was gone.Early into the search, the girl’s pink jacket was found several hundred yards away from where she went missing, police said.The family says they live in the Monroe, Michigan, area, which is about 200 miles south of where the girl went missing.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,Michigan State Police(MONROE, Mich.) — A 2-year-old girl was found alive Tuesday morning, one day after she went missing while on a family camping trip in northern Michigan, authorities said.Gabriella Roselynn Vitale was reported missing on Monday, launching an urgent, overnight search.Over 50 searchers and 10 canines were looking for the little girl Tuesday morning before Michigan State Police announced that she had been found.Gabriella’s family had told the Oscoda County Sheriff’s Office and Michigan State Police that they had been camping in a wooded area for a few days and were getting ready to leave Monday morning when they noticed that the toddler was gone.Early into the search, the girl’s pink jacket was found several hundred yards away from where she went missing, police said.The family says they live in the Monroe, Michigan, area, which is about 200 miles south of where the girl went missing.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Mom allegedly threatens to shoot up elementary school, references Parkland gunman

first_imgPalm Beach County Sheriffs Office(LAKE WORTH, Fla.) — A Florida mom allegedly threatened to shoot up an elementary school because she was upset over her kids’ move to a different building — and made reference to Parkland shooter Nikolas Cruz in a conversation about the threat, according to documents.Miranda Perez, 28, of Lake Worth, Florida, has been charged with sending a written threat to conduct a mass shooting, according to the probable cause affidavit.Perez allegedly told a man on Facebook messenger on Sunday that she was upset her kids were being moved to Barton Elementary School in Lake Worth, according to the affidavit.The man said Perez “made comments in reference” to Cruz, who is accused of killing 17 people in a shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last year.Perez allegedly told the man via Facebook video chat that she was going to Facebook friend Cruz’s brother, Zachary Cruz, because she likes “violent things,” the affidavit said.After the video chat, Perez allegedly wrote on Facebook messenger to the man, “I’m thinking of doing a school shooting at Barton… It’s there [sic] fault,” the affidavit said.Perez’s home was among those impacted by a school board resolution that forced about 390 students to change schools to help address overcrowding, according to the Miami Herald.Perez allegedly confirmed that she did send the messages and said “she did think about shooting the school, but claimed she would never actually do it,” the affidavit said.Perez was arrested Sunday and has been taken to a behavioral treatment center, according to court records. She has not yet appeared in court or been assigned an attorney, according to the public defender’s office.School district spokeswoman Julie Houston Trieste told ABC News the arrest was brought to the district’s attention by the sheriff’s office. She declined to comment further citing the ongoing case. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

California man sentenced to 30 days in jail for fatally shooting protected mountain lion

first_imgiStock(LOS ANGELES) — A California man has been sentenced to 30 days in jail and other penalties for the killing of a protected mountain lion over the summer.Alfredo Gonzalez, 60, of Simi Valley, was sentenced Thursday immediately after he pleaded guilty to fatally shooting the cougar, known as P-38, and vandalizing its GPS collar back in July, according to the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office.In addition to the 30 days in Ventura County Jail, a judge sentenced Gonzalez to serve 30 days in a work release program, 240 hours of community service at an animal shelter, three years of probation and to pay a fine $150. The judge also declared the rifle Gonzalez used to shoot the mountain lion a nuisance and ordered it to be destroyed, according to the district attorney’s office.Gonzalez could not be reached for comment Friday.P-38 was part of a cougar population being studied by National Park Service biologists, according to the district attorney’s office. First collared in 2015, the 7-year-old male mountain lion predominately roamed parts of the Santa Susana Mountains, which surround Simi Valley in Southern California.The biologists detected a mortality signal from the animal’s collar on July 2. The body of P-38 was later found in the Simi Valley area with a gunshot wound to the head, according to the district attorney’s office. Its GPS collar, valued at $950, had been vandalized, too, according to the office.It’s unlawful to kill a mountain lion in the state without a permit from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Coronavirus updates: Wuhan lab director calls virus leak claims ‘pure fabrication’

first_imgiStockBy: JON HAWORTH, ABC News (NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 342,000 people worldwide.Over 5.3 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.The United States is the worst-affected country in the world, with more than 1.6 million diagnosed cases and at least 96,046 deaths.Today’s biggest developments:– US nears 100,000 deaths– Wuhan lab director calls virus leak claims ‘pure fabrication’– Michigan and Missouri announce change in reporting of COVID-19 testing data– Brazil passes Russia, now has second most confirmed cases globally– Scientist claims COVID-19 ‘disappearing’ so fast, Oxford vaccine has ‘only 50% chance of working’Here’s how the news is developing today. All times Eastern.9:20 a.m.: Success of reopening will depend on following guidance, Birx saysDr. Deborah Birx, one of the leaders of the government’s response to the virus, pinned the success of reopening efforts on the public’s ability to follow the direction of public health experts.“I think it’s our job as public health officials, every day to be informing the public that what puts them at risk,” said Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, in an interview on ABC’s “This Week” Sunday. “We’ve learned a lot about this virus, but we now need to translate that learning into real change behavior that stays with us so we can continue to drive down the number of cases.”“This only works if we all follow the guidelines and protect one another,” Birx continued.Despite the U.S. death toll approaching 100,000, Birx struck a cautiously optimistic tone on Friday during a White House press conference — her first in several weeks — sharing approval of increased public activity over Memorial Day weekend, provided precautionary measures, like social distancing, continue to be adhered to.“You can go to the beaches if you stay 6 feet apart,” she said. “But remember that is your space, and that is the space you need to protect to ensure you are socially distancing for others.”9:05 a.m.: Coronavirus ‘is not yet contained,’ FDA commissioner saysAs states begin to open up during Memorial Day weekend, the FDA commissioner reminded the public to continue to protect themselves from exposure to the coronavirus.“I again remind everyone that the coronavirus is not yet contained,” Dr. Stephen Hahn said in a Twitter post on Sunday morning. “It is up to every individual to protect themselves and their community. Social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks protect us all.”6:15 a.m.: Scientist claims COVID-19 ‘disappearing’ so fast, Oxford vaccine has ‘only 50% chance of working’The professor co-leading the vaccine development says the virus is disappearing so quickly in Britain, the vaccine trial being run by Oxford University only has a 50% chance of success.The trial depends on having enough vaccinated people to essentially go out into the wild and catch the virus in order for the vaccine to be tested.Earlier in the year when the infection rate was much higher, researchers expected an 80% chance of an effective vaccine. That’s now dropped to 50% according to Professor Adrian Hill.“It’s a race against the virus disappearing, and against time”, Hill told the Telegraph newspaper in the U.K. “At the moment, there’s a 50% chance that we get no result at all.”The experimental vaccine, known as ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, is one of the front-runners in the global race to provide protection against the new coronavirus causing the COVID-19 pandemic.Hill’s team began early-stage human trials of the vaccine in April, making it one of only a handful to have reached that milestone.6:00 a.m.: Brazil passes Russia, now has second most confirmed cases globallyBrazil has now surpassed Russia with a total number of confirmed cases standing at 347, 398. That’s up 16,508 from the previous figure, according to Johns Hopkins University.Russia on Sunday reported their updated figure at a total of 344,481.Brazil now stands as having the second most confirmed cases globally, with the current number likely to rise even higher once newer figures are reported.4:51 a.m.: Michigan and Missouri announce change in reporting of COVID-19 testing dataThe state of Michigan announced that they would be changing the way they report COVID-19 testing data by separating the results of diagnostic tests and serology tests.The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services said in a statement that “the change makes the data more accurate and relevant as the state continues to expand diagnostic testing to help slow and contain the spread of COVID-19. The update to the website separates out the results of two different types of tests – serology and diagnostic. Michigan – along with some other states – has not separated data for diagnostic and serology tests. Data on serology testing – also known as antibody testing – is separated from the other testing numbers. Currently, serology testing can be used to help determine whether someone has ever had COVID-19, while traditional viral diagnostic tests determine if someone has active disease.”“Diagnostic tests are most helpful in tracking the spread of COVID-19 since they can show the number of people who currently have the COVID-19 virus. Serology tests are still being studied regarding their utility. They are currently most helpful in understanding how much a community may have been exposed to the disease. However, it is unknown if the presence of an antibody truly means someone is immune to COVID-19, and if so, for how long. Results of antibody tests should not change decisions on whether an individual should return to work, or if they should quarantine based on exposure to someone with the disease. Approximately 12 percent of Michigan’s tests overall have been serology tests; about 60 percent of those have been from the past nine days,” the statement read.Meanwhile, Missouri also announced their own changes regarding their reporting of COVID-19 cases.“The Governor calls on us as public servants to get better every day,” said Dr. Randall Williams, director of Missouri’s DHSS. “As we continue to learn more about this virus and new tests emerge, we will continue providing better data with greater clarity and transparency to help Missourians make the best decisions for their health care possible.”According to a statement released by Missouri’s DHSS, some key changes in the data will include:•A change in the percent positivity rate. The percent positivity rate was previously calculated as the number of positive COVID-19 cases divided by the total number of tests completed. The new calculation is the number of positive cases divided by the number of people tested (not the number of tests done). These changes will increase the rate of positive cases as reported through the dashboard. This is because each positive individual may have multiple tests done, increasing the size of the denominator (the number of tests) but not the numerator (number of confirmed COVID-19 cases). The previously-reported rate cannot be compared to the current rate.•The tests performed by day will include PCR tests only, which indicates only if a person has an active COVID-19 case. Numbers will have decreased from previous days’ reporting because DHSS is no longer including people who received only serology tests.•Given the marked increase in serology testing, DHSS is now reporting separate information on serology which is collected through a blood test to determine if a person has previously been infected and has formed antibodies against the virus.2:37 a.m.: Wuhan lab director calls virus leak claims ‘pure fabrication’Claims that the global coronavirus pandemic originated at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in the central Chinese city are a “pure fabrication,” the institute’s director said.Wang Yanyi said the institute did not have any knowledge before that “nor had we ever encountered, researched or kept the virus. In fact, like everyone else, we didn’t even know the virus existed. How could it have leaked from our lab when we never had it?”Wang Yanyi continued: “Many people might misunderstand that since our institute reported the RaTG-13’s genome similarity to SARS-CoV-2, we must have the RaTG-13 virus in our lab. In fact, that’s not the case. When we were sequencing the genes of this bat virus sample, we got the genome sequence of the RaTG-13 but we didn’t isolate nor obtain the live virus of RaTG-13. Thus, there is no possibility of us leaking RaTG-13.”8:58 p.m.: Minnesota’s governor allows places of worship to openMinnesota Gov. Tim Walz announced that starting Wednesday, he will allow places of worship to reopen at 25% capacity if they adhere to social distancing and other public health guidelines.Walz also announced that COVID-19 cases are still climbing and may not reach the peak until summer.The state’s health commissioner said there was an increase of 847 positive coronavirus cases Friday — the highest daily total. There have been 19,845 positive cases in the state thus far.ABC News’ Adam Kelsey and Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Inside Seattle’s autonomous zone where residents are trying to ‘enact change’ ‘in a new way’

first_imgDavid Ryder/Getty ImagesBy EMILY SHAPRIO and MATT GUTMAN, ABC News(SEATTLE) — Near downtown Seattle, a several-block section of the city is sealed off.Inside, people can walk freely among murals, access free food and gather to organize to protest. Critics have called it a block party, but participants are calling it an “ad-hoc conglomeration of people” in a festival-like environment “where the only headliner is change.” When protests over the death of George Floyd erupted across the country, some of the most explosive standoffs with police were in Seattle, where officers blasted demonstrators with tear gas, flash-bang grenades and pepper spray.Following days of clashes, Seattle police on June 8 largely withdrew from the Capitol Hill district, leaving a void for protesters.The protesters seized a roughly six-block area, including the east precinct, to create an “autonomous police-free zone.” Sealed off from outsiders by barricades, patrolled by armed residents, police aren’t allowed inside.The zone, initially called the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, or CHAZ, has been renamed the Capitol Hill Organized Protest.Slate, a CHOP security leader who didn’t provide a full name to ABC News, described CHOP as an “ad-hoc conglomeration of people who want some change” within the police department.But exactly what kind of change varies among groups within CHOP. Some want the Seattle Police Department abolished, while others want it defunded, with more money reallocated to community programs.“We want our money back, because we’re not getting our money’s worth,” said Riall Johnson of the Snohomish County NAACP.Johnson is not a member of CHOP but has given speeches within the zone and worked with its members.“We need to revaluate our policing system,” Johnson told ABC News, and CHOP is an “example of what things can look like without the police.”CHOP leaders are in ongoing negotiations with the city.“If it seems kind of chaotic, that’s because it is,” Slate said. “The more the idea of what CHOP is changes, the more the situation on the ground will change.”President Donald Trump has blasted Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan about the zone on Twitter, threatening, “Take back your city NOW. If you don’t do it, I will.” Last week Trump tweeted that the protesters are “anarchists.”“We’re not trying to start a new nation. We’re not trying to build some empire,” Slate said. “We’re trying to enact change in a way that this city hasn’t seen before.”Durkan, for now, is refusing to take back the area.“One of the most fundamental rights we have as Americans is the right to peacefully assemble, to protest government and to exercise free speech,” Durkan told ABC News’ Nightline. “And we protect that kind of speech and disagreement with government.“These protests are protests fundamentally about a policing system that has tried to dominate black Americans through the history of our country. You don’t meet those protests with domination. You meet them with listening and with change. This president just wants to distract. If he truly cared about America and the divisions that were happening now, he’d be bringing us together and find ways for us to move forward,” she said.Durkan said de-escalating the tensions between the people and police in Capitol Hill requires time and distance.“We need to have some time for people to feel that they have had the ability to protest and raise their voices and have the time to work, not just with the people on Capitol Hill but with all of Seattle,” she said.As for the occupation of the police department’s east precinct, Durkan said, “The precinct itself is just the building. Our focus is on how do we make sure that policing adapts to this situation.”But Victoria Beach, chair of the police department’s African American Community Advisory Council, said Durkan’s stance is giving license to a lawless party.CHOP “has nothing to do with black lives or what happened to George Floyd. I feel like it’s not honoring or respecting him,” Beach told Nightline.“It’s not a protest … I call it Burning Man,” Beach said. “It’s very disrespectful. The message is totally taken away.”Slate and Johnson disagreed.To Slate, it’s a festival-like environment “where the only headliner is change.”“There’s a lot of activism going on there,” Johnson said, “but it’s also mixed in with art and a general sense of community.”Johnson described the environment in the zone as a block party, which he said is not out of the ordinary for Capitol Hill — especially during Pride Month, as the neighborhood has a large LGBTQ+ community.“It’s a community of people taking care of each other,” Johnson said. “People donating food, money. There’s doctors there. Homeless people are actually getting the help they need.”“Call it whatever — drum circle, block party, festival,” Johnson said. “There’s still a lot of people there vigilant, knowing that there’s a mission there — that mission is changing the police system.”Like Beach, activist Sean Gaston also is frustrated. He said the autonomous zone looks “chaotic” and “like buffoonery,” with scattered tents and brightly colored writing, but “no message.”“We don’t march no more and we’re not saying nothing beneficial,” Gaston told Nightline. “No one cares about the economic issues of black America. No one wants to talk about how we need to have housing, jobs.”“Black poverty is real and it’s systemic,” he added. “And it makes us commit crimes against ourselves and our own communities because there’s nothing there, and the only people we can victimize are blacks.”As CHOP continues, its future remains unknown.“This is not an easy, clean, cute story,” Slate said. “Change is coming incrementally, but it’s very hard to be the city to negotiate with the CHOP, because the CHOP is … an idea. It’s not really a goal.”“It took this to get to the negotiation table,” Slate said. “The system as a whole has been ignoring us for so long.”When asked how long she thinks CHOP will last, Durkan told Nightline, “I think it’s the wrong question.”“I think the question is,” she added, “how quickly can we start changing as a society to address all of the concerns we’ve heard from the millions of people? We need to change how we do policing, but we also need to invest in communities, in health care systems, education, economic opportunity. It is time for us to make the promise of America real for all Americans.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.,David Ryder/Getty ImagesBy EMILY SHAPRIO and MATT GUTMAN, ABC News(SEATTLE) — Near downtown Seattle, a several-block section of the city is sealed off.Inside, people can walk freely among murals, access free food and gather to organize to protest. Critics have called it a block party, but participants are calling it an “ad-hoc conglomeration of people” in a festival-like environment “where the only headliner is change.” When protests over the death of George Floyd erupted across the country, some of the most explosive standoffs with police were in Seattle, where officers blasted demonstrators with tear gas, flash-bang grenades and pepper spray.Following days of clashes, Seattle police on June 8 largely withdrew from the Capitol Hill district, leaving a void for protesters.The protesters seized a roughly six-block area, including the east precinct, to create an “autonomous police-free zone.” Sealed off from outsiders by barricades, patrolled by armed residents, police aren’t allowed inside.The zone, initially called the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, or CHAZ, has been renamed the Capitol Hill Organized Protest.Slate, a CHOP security leader who didn’t provide a full name to ABC News, described CHOP as an “ad-hoc conglomeration of people who want some change” within the police department.But exactly what kind of change varies among groups within CHOP. Some want the Seattle Police Department abolished, while others want it defunded, with more money reallocated to community programs.“We want our money back, because we’re not getting our money’s worth,” said Riall Johnson of the Snohomish County NAACP.Johnson is not a member of CHOP but has given speeches within the zone and worked with its members.“We need to revaluate our policing system,” Johnson told ABC News, and CHOP is an “example of what things can look like without the police.”CHOP leaders are in ongoing negotiations with the city.“If it seems kind of chaotic, that’s because it is,” Slate said. “The more the idea of what CHOP is changes, the more the situation on the ground will change.”President Donald Trump has blasted Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan about the zone on Twitter, threatening, “Take back your city NOW. If you don’t do it, I will.” Last week Trump tweeted that the protesters are “anarchists.”“We’re not trying to start a new nation. We’re not trying to build some empire,” Slate said. “We’re trying to enact change in a way that this city hasn’t seen before.”Durkan, for now, is refusing to take back the area.“One of the most fundamental rights we have as Americans is the right to peacefully assemble, to protest government and to exercise free speech,” Durkan told ABC News’ Nightline. “And we protect that kind of speech and disagreement with government.“These protests are protests fundamentally about a policing system that has tried to dominate black Americans through the history of our country. You don’t meet those protests with domination. You meet them with listening and with change. This president just wants to distract. If he truly cared about America and the divisions that were happening now, he’d be bringing us together and find ways for us to move forward,” she said.Durkan said de-escalating the tensions between the people and police in Capitol Hill requires time and distance.“We need to have some time for people to feel that they have had the ability to protest and raise their voices and have the time to work, not just with the people on Capitol Hill but with all of Seattle,” she said.As for the occupation of the police department’s east precinct, Durkan said, “The precinct itself is just the building. Our focus is on how do we make sure that policing adapts to this situation.”But Victoria Beach, chair of the police department’s African American Community Advisory Council, said Durkan’s stance is giving license to a lawless party.CHOP “has nothing to do with black lives or what happened to George Floyd. I feel like it’s not honoring or respecting him,” Beach told Nightline.“It’s not a protest … I call it Burning Man,” Beach said. “It’s very disrespectful. The message is totally taken away.”Slate and Johnson disagreed.To Slate, it’s a festival-like environment “where the only headliner is change.”“There’s a lot of activism going on there,” Johnson said, “but it’s also mixed in with art and a general sense of community.”Johnson described the environment in the zone as a block party, which he said is not out of the ordinary for Capitol Hill — especially during Pride Month, as the neighborhood has a large LGBTQ+ community.“It’s a community of people taking care of each other,” Johnson said. “People donating food, money. There’s doctors there. Homeless people are actually getting the help they need.”“Call it whatever — drum circle, block party, festival,” Johnson said. “There’s still a lot of people there vigilant, knowing that there’s a mission there — that mission is changing the police system.”Like Beach, activist Sean Gaston also is frustrated. He said the autonomous zone looks “chaotic” and “like buffoonery,” with scattered tents and brightly colored writing, but “no message.”“We don’t march no more and we’re not saying nothing beneficial,” Gaston told Nightline. “No one cares about the economic issues of black America. No one wants to talk about how we need to have housing, jobs.”“Black poverty is real and it’s systemic,” he added. “And it makes us commit crimes against ourselves and our own communities because there’s nothing there, and the only people we can victimize are blacks.”As CHOP continues, its future remains unknown.“This is not an easy, clean, cute story,” Slate said. “Change is coming incrementally, but it’s very hard to be the city to negotiate with the CHOP, because the CHOP is … an idea. It’s not really a goal.”“It took this to get to the negotiation table,” Slate said. “The system as a whole has been ignoring us for so long.”When asked how long she thinks CHOP will last, Durkan told Nightline, “I think it’s the wrong question.”“I think the question is,” she added, “how quickly can we start changing as a society to address all of the concerns we’ve heard from the millions of people? We need to change how we do policing, but we also need to invest in communities, in health care systems, education, economic opportunity. It is time for us to make the promise of America real for all Americans.” Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Grand Canyon hiker died from suspected heat exposure: Park officials

first_imgSumikoPhoto/iStockBy MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A hiker who died at Grand Canyon National Park last week succumbed to suspected heat exposure, officials said.The victim was identified as Catherine Houe, 49, of Daly City, California. According to park officials, Houe, her husband and a friend were planning to spend the night at Phantom Ranch, a lodge inside the Grand Canyon. They had hiked about four miles down the South Kaibab Trail on Wednesday when Houe “became dizzy, disoriented, and then stopped breathing,” officials said.The Grand Canyon Regional Communications Center received a call about the incident a little after 5:30 p.m. local time. CPR was performed and the National Park Service personnel responded via helicopter.The cause of death is believed to be heat-related, park officials said. The high at Phantom Ranch that day was approximately 114 degrees, according to the officials.The National Park Service said it is investigating the incident with the Coconino County Medical Examiner’s Office.National Park Rangers are urging visitors to the Grand Canyon to be prepared for high temperatures in the coming weeks. Temperatures on the trails can reach over 120 degrees in the shade during the summer, officials said. Hiking in extreme heat can lead to heat exhaustion, heatstroke, hyponatremia and death.This is the first death reported by the National Park Service this year in the Grand Canyon, which closed on April 1 due to concerns over the coronavirus pandemic. It started partially reopening to visitors on May 15. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Parents hail teens for heroic icy pond rescue of their two children

first_imgRich HeidBy MILES COHEN, ABC News(NEW YORK) — What started as a fun family day in the snow quickly turned into a nightmare when two young children fell into a freezing pond in need of an urgent, icy rescue.Rich Heid told ABC News his two children R.J., 4, and Olivia, 8, went flying down a hill on an inflatable sled at Beacon Hill Country Club in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey when they slid over a patch of ice into a frozen pond. “I started screaming, ‘Jump off, jump off, jump off,’” he recalled. The scene was reminiscent of the scene in the Christmas classic, It’s a Wonderful Life, when George and his friends save his younger brother, Harry, from drowning in freezing cold water.“You could see fear in their eyes,” the children’s mother, Stephanie Irlbeck, told ABC News. “Looking at him screaming ‘Jump off, jump off.’ I was screaming, ‘Someone get them!’” Luckily, a nearby group of teenage boys heard the cries for help and raced over to save the kids.“All of a sudden we heard the dad shouting, ‘Get off, get off,’” Kieran Foley said.The 14-year-old Boy Scout led the way and dove into the water as his friends formed a chain to help pull the two kids to safety. “When Kieran was running toward them, the mud was so thick it sucked his boots off,” Irlbeck said, adding that he went into the water with his phone still in his pocket.“Tyler helped with Olivia getting her out. she was a bit more heavier,” Foley said. “I took R.J., brought them back to shore to the mother’s hands, and then we actually just start comforting them,” Ryan Day told ABC News. “We were shaking — R.J. was freezing,” Olivia Heid told ABC News. “Life is much more valuable than a phone. So I say its a good choice to just get in there and get them out,” Foley explained. “These are all materialistic items. Now, we had life. Life’s at stake.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Act to halt female brain drain, law firms warned

first_imgAn HR director has called on legal firms to adopt family-friendly policiesto avoid losing expensively trained female lawyers.Warren Green, director of human resources at recruitment consultancy EJLegal, said, “It costs a small fortune to train a lawyer – and to replaceone that leaves.”If female lawyers leave firms because they cannot balance working andfamily life, it is the profession that will lose out.”Green was commenting on a survey commissioned by EJ Legal. It found adiscrepancy between the number of hours solicitors say they are working and thehours HR managers think they are working.The average number of hours worked by solicitors each week is 47, althoughHR managers put the figure at 39. The survey questioned 50 HR managers and 50solicitors in the top 100 law firms.Forty-nine per cent of solicitors said they would like their employer to bemore sympathetic to parental leave.HR managers expressed concern about the administration of parental leave but70 per cent said they believed companies would be forced to adapt.A further 60 per cent of HR managers said they were concerned about stresscaused by staff working long hours.Green added, “If firms can adapt to a family-friendly culture and useflexible working practices, they can increase both productivity and staffretention.”• A survey commissioned by Mother and Baby magazine found 81 per cent of newmothers would choose to stay at home with their child if they could afford todo so. Eighty-two per cent said they also felt having a baby had damaged theircareers. Act to halt female brain drain, law firms warnedOn 11 Apr 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more