ESPN Predicts The Winner Of The Michigan-Penn State Game

first_imgShea Patterson of the Michigan Wolverines looks to pass.ANN ARBOR, MI – OCTOBER 13: Shea Patterson #2 of the Michigan Wolverines looks to pass while playing the Wisconsin Badgers on October 13, 2018 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Michigan won the game 38-13. (Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images)If the Michigan Wolverines are going to run the table in the Big Ten, then Jim Harbaugh’s squad will need to defeat another ranked opponent next weekend. With Penn State coming into town for an intense battle, the stakes will be high.The Wolverines were off this past week, meanwhile the Nittany Lions were in a tough showdown against Iowa. Despite playing in brutal weather, Penn State improved its record to 6-2 on the season.Michigan was rolling before the bye week, and ESPN fully expects them to continue its winning ways on Saturday.According to the FPI, the Wolverines have a 68.6 percent chance of defeating the Nittany Lions.The duo of Shea Patterson and Karan Higdon has carried Michigan’s offense through the first half of the season. Well, they’ll need to bring their best efforts in order to keep pace with Trace McSorley and Miles Sanders.Penn State and Michigan are set to kick off at 3:45 p.m. ET from Ann Arbor.Who do you think will win this matchup?last_img read more

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USA: Construction of Washington’s Newest Olympic Class Ferry

first_img Print  Close 此页面无法正确加载 Google 地图。您是否拥有此网站?确定 WSDOT, December 24, 2013 My location zoom The video captures construction of Washington’s newest Olympic Class ferry, 144-car Tokitae, from the start of construction through summer 2013.Vigor Industrial began construction of the Tokitae in March 2012 at the company’s Seattle shipyard. Vigor fabricated major modules and assembled them, along with the vessel ends made by Jesse Engineering in Tacoma, into a complete hull.The shipyard hit a major milestone in March 2013, when they moved the superstructure of the Tokitae onto the hull while both structures were in floating drydocks. The 1100-ton superstructure was fabricated at Nichols Brothers Boat Builders on Whidbey Island. The shipyard hit another milestone in July, when it floated the vessel out of drydock to finish final outfitting pier side.The Tokitae is scheduled for delivery to Washington State Ferries in early 2014.last_img read more

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After Ebola outbreak expert panel urges unified entity within UN health agency

“Now is the historic political moment for world leaders to give WHO new relevance and empower it to lead in global health,” said the panel’s first report, commissioned by WHO’s Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan and shared today with member States in advance of next week’s World Health Assembly, the world’s highest-level health setting body.“A strengthened, well-funded WHO can support all countries as they prepare to meet the challenges of increasing global interdependence and shared vulnerability,” the report said. “In response, the [WHO] Secretariat needs to take serious steps to earn this leadership role in relation to outbreaks and emergency response and to regain the trust of the international community.” The panel will present its final report after visiting and consulting with the affected countries, currently set for June 2015.WHO spokesman Tarik Jašarevic told the UN News Centre that the agency appreciated the work done by the panel to have the report ready ahead of the World Health Assembly so that member States could assess the committee’s findings and make recommendations based on those findings. “We can then take forward the recommendations endorsed by our member States,” Mr. Jašarevic said.The Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) outbreak is the largest and most complex Ebola outbreak on record, and to date has affected more than 26,000 people including over 11,000 deaths, mostly in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.Retracing the timeline of the epidemic, the report said that “although WHO drew attention to the ‘unprecedented outbreak’ at a press conference in April 2014, this was not followed by international mobilization and a consistent communication strategy.”“The countries most affected, other WHO Member States, the WHO Secretariat, and the wider global community were all “behind the curve” of the rapid spread of the Ebola virus,” it said. “Further, in this emergency, before August 2014 WHO did not appropriately seek support from other United Nations agencies and humanitarian actors in the United Nations Inter-Agency Standing Committee system,” it said. “ At an earlier stage these resources could have been made available and known systems put in place; these might have averted the crisis that led to the need to establish the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER).”And “given WHO’s extensive experience with outbreaks, health promotion and social mobilization,” the panel noted, “it is surprising that it took until August or September 2014 to recognize that Ebola transmission would be brought under control only when surveillance, community mobilization and the delivery of appropriate health care to affected communities were all put in place simultaneously.”The panel, chaired by Barbara Stocking, President of Murray Edwards College, University of Cambridge of the United Kingdom and former chief executive of Oxfam GB, concluded that “there is a strong, if not complete, consensus that WHO does not have a robust emergency operations capacity or culture.”The report says that each global health crisis has shown the tragic consequences, including those in the social and economic spheres, of the failure of countries to invest in global public goods for health. Those failures are then mirrored as weaknesses in WHO, as the agency suffers from a lack of political and financial commitment by its Member States despite the global health risks they face.“The Ebola outbreak might have looked very different had the same political will and significant resources that were spent in responding to it been made available to member States and the WHO Secretariat over the past five years in order to support three key areas of action: ensuring global health preparedness at country level in implementing the International Health Regulations (2005); supporting countries to establish or strengthen primary health care systems; and developing diagnostics, vaccines, and medicines for neglected tropical diseases.”Turning to the number of options that have been suggested by different organizations and individuals regarding the way forward for WHO, the report listed three: a new agency should be established for health emergencies; the emergency part of the health response should be led by another United Nations agency; or investments should be made so that the operational capacity of WHO for emergency response is fully in place. The panel said it recommends that the third option “be pursued with vigour.”“As WHO already has the mandate to deliver on operational response, it would be a far more effective and efficient use of resources to make WHO fit for purpose,” the report concluded. “This will require the resources and political will of the Member States.”In addition to Ms. Stocking, the other members of the panel are: Professor Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfun, Director-General of the National Institute for Biomedical Research, Democratic Republic of the Congo; Dr Faisal Shuaib, Head of the National Ebola Emergency Operations Center, Nigeria; Dr Carmencita Alberto-Banatin, independent consultant and advisor on health emergencies and disasters, Philippines; Professor Julio Frenk, Dean of the Faculty, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; and Professor Ilona Kickbusch, Director of the Global Health Programme at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland. read more

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Column Guess what Scifi films can be artful funny – and Irish

first_imgI GREW UP on sci-fi. Star Wars, ET, Superman… these were the movies that made me want to make movies. As a boy I always wondered why these stories never happened in Ireland. Why did Superman have to crash land in Kansas? Why did ET get stranded in California? Sure, Luke Skywalker lived in a galaxy far, far away but he, Han Solo and Princess Leia were definitely from planet America. Why couldn’t movies like these be made here, I wondered? Naïve is not the word.I think the first explanation I got was that Hollywood made trash, frankly, and with our tradition of world-class literature and tragic history, the stories most socially relevant and artistically-worthy rarely featured aliens or ray-guns or kick-ass spaceships that could do the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs. We were serious storytellers. They were peddling cheap popcorn and sticky candyfloss, tasty while on your tongue but devoid of any real merit.Sci-fi isn’t trash – many are classic stories, artfully toldI didn’t buy it. Hollywood did make trash, it’s fair to say, but it also made Star Wars – my favourite film (still!). Jaws wasn’t trash either, I was sure. And Close Encounters, Raiders, Empire and Jedi? Classic stories beautifully, artfully told. Right? “But they’re not reality” I was assured. This was a bad thing. We do reality, they do make-believe, and make-believe is inherently inferior. I didn’t buy that either.So if it’s not because Irish films are simply more worthy, and are obliged to reflect our historical tragedies or economic miseries (admittedly to occasionally brilliant effect), then what is it? Why don’t we make these kinds of movies? Well, money doesn’t just make the world go round, it builds sets, sews costumes and gives serious CG polish to the sight of New York (not Dublin!) swallowed by earthquakes and tidal waves. We don’t have the cash, so we can’t create the spectacle.  We can’t compete, so why try? And wouldn’t it be better to play down the whole liquidity problem and instead suggest that we are somehow better off being unable to render anything vaguely fantastical? Sure sci-fi and fantasy are just silly nonsense anyway. Films are supposed to be about reality. Yep. Reality. Got it.Now, I wouldn’t be fool enough to say that things have completely changed since the ’80s, that computer-generated images of cinematic quality can be created in someone’s bedroom (although they can), or that advances in digital technology have levelled the playing field with Hollywood (they haven’t). But we can do a lot more now. We can record film-quality images on memory cards at a fraction of the cost of celluloid. We can edit feature films on laptops. And if I want to depict a scene in which a national monument turns into a projectile, I can (so long as I promise not to do it too often). It’s hardly cheap, but it’s far more affordable than it used to be.These kinds of movies don’t get made in Ireland… or do they?So, the time was right, it seemed, for me to pitch my idea for a story about a young man living a lonely, mundane life in Dublin who may in fact be an alien hiding on earth from intergalactic bounty hunters… or who may be deluded (“tune in next week to find out!” as the cheesy old sci-fi serials used to say). My hopes were low. These kinds of movies didn’t get made in Ireland after all.I hoped I’d been clever – the story wasn’t dependent on expensive visual effects (they would be sparingly used for, hopefully, maximum impact), wasn’t riddled with sci-fi gobbledygook, had more than a few scenes I was confident were laugh-out-loud funny, and presented at its core a sweet and accessible love-story about two out-of-place people finding each other and carving out a relationship in difficult circumstances. But it definitely wasn’t reality. Sure, it had a message, if you were looking for one, and theme and subtext and character-arcs and all that stuff high-brow connoisseurs look for, but it was essentially a fun romp designed to put big smiles on people’s faces. They were never going to go for that, I assured myself.But they did. Nobody seemed deterred by the imagery I intended to depict, or the weird devices I described, or the lashings of geeky sci-fi reference I couldn’t help but throw in. It turned out that they just really liked the characters and the story. It put big smiles on their faces. Shows what I know.And now today, 15 March, EARTHBOUND goes on national release. I know Irish films are a tough sell but I can’t help but get my hopes up.  Audiences who’ve seen it so far have walked out grinning wide. I’d love to see the same look on more faces – but it won’t be easy. People are sceptical, and I don’t blame them. I mean, surely this Irish sci-fi rom-com (huh?) can’t be as much fun as the trashy Hollywood candy-floss flavoured popcorn playing next door, can it? After all, we don’t make films like that in this country. Or do we?Tune in next week to find out!Alan Brennan graduated from Dublin institute of Technology in 2000 with a BSc in Media Arts. Alan is lives in Dublin with his wife and son, and developing his next feature Before Midnight, a supernatural thriller, with support from the Irish Film Board.EARTHBOUND opens 15 March across Ireland. Dublin: Cineworld, IMC Dun Laoghaire, IMC Tallaght, Movies@Dundrum, Movies@Swords, ODEON Coolock, ODEON Point Village. Regional: Movies@Gorey, Mayo Movie World, SGC Dungarvan, ODEON Waterford , ODEON Limerick.last_img read more

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