SMC begins club for food allergies

first_imgSaint Mary’s freshman Megan Steron is one of two million people in the United States living with celiac disease, a digestive disorder that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. Her intolerance to gluten, a protein in wheat, rye and barley, makes eating on a college campus a challenge. “About two weeks into school, I was sitting in the dining hall by myself, trying to eat a measly salad since there was nothing else agreeable for me to eat that day,” Steron said. “After about five minutes, I knew I had to do something about it, not just for myself, but for all the girls at Saint Mary’s that want and need more options for their food sensitivities.” Steron decided to establish Dining Hall Divas, a club for Saint Mary’s students suffering from celiac disease, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome and food allergies. “This club is for those who share common [lists] of food that they can and cannot eat,” she said. Steron and the Divas will be working closely with the dining hall staff to ensure the needs of students with special dietary requirements are met consistently. They will also be communicating with the College’s food providers to ensure ingredient information is accurate and clear. Steron said she hopes to program tutorials for the dining hall staff focusing on basic food safety, covering topics such as changing gloves after working with allergy-triggering foods. In the long term, she hopes to also expand options available to those with restricted diets. “I really wanted to start this club up because I’m one of those girls who has a hard time finding something substantial enough to eat in the dining hall without having a bad reaction to it,” Steron said. The club has established a website to keep students informed on the group’s work and the progress of dietary accommodations at the College. “We have a website for the Dining Hall Divas, which is linked to the Saint Mary’s page, where any student, prospective or current, can see the strides we are making for a more gluten-free environment here,” she said. Steron said the club has met with dining hall staff three times and has already drawn out some possible improvements. Interested students can contact Steron at mstero01@saintmarys.edu.last_img read more

Novelist to deliver lecture on ethics and public policy

first_imgIndian novelist Amitav Ghosh will deliver the 23rd annual Hesburgh Lecture in Ethics and Public Policy, the University announced in a press release Monday.The Hesburgh Lecture, which the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies established in honor of University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh, is devoted to examining “an issue related to ethics and public policy in the context of peace and justice,” according to the press release.Ghosh — who has received the Arthur C. Clarke award, the Crossword Book Prize and a Man Booker Prize shortlisting — will explore the topic of climate change and address the current discussion of the topic, which “has skewed the discourse in certain directions with predominantly economic characterizations of problems and technological solutions,” the press release said.“The Kroc Institute is delighted to partner with the Department of English and the Liu Institute in welcoming Amitav Ghosh to deliver this important annual lecture,” Ruth Abbey, interim director of the Kroc Institute, said in the release.Ghosh will deliver his lecture at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the Jordan Auditorium of the Mendoza College of Business.Tags: Climate change, Hesburgh Lecture, Kroc Institute for International Peace Studieslast_img read more

What makes a good leader good?

first_img 134SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The business world isn’t short on leaders. However, an employee may argue that finding the kind of leader that makes you excited to come to work is quite rare.There are certain traits that just about anyone can adopt to become a better leader and boss. Bill Murphy Jr., executive editor of operations for Some Spider and founder of ProGhostwriters.com, provides an excellent list of 27 things “truly exceptional bosses do every day.” His list includes everything from having a sense of humor and being polite to sharing information.The more these traits are practiced, the more they become our genuine defaults. And it is then that we become the kind of leaders that make employees excited to come to work.Marcel Schwantes, principal and founder of Leadership From the Core, lists five signs that test whether a leader truly has leadership skills. (Don’t think employees can’t see through a false demonstration of leadership abilities every now and then.) continue reading »last_img read more