Call-out for youth program coaches & managers

first_imgTouch Football Australia (TFA) is currently seeking to appoint suitably qualified coaches to the vacant coaching and team manager positions within the National Youth Program. The Australian Youth teams will be attending the 2020 Youth Trans Tasman in Australia in January 2020.Expression of Interest ProcessTFA is seeking Expressions of Interest (EOI) from suitably qualified, currently accredited and active Elite level coaches and managers to fill the following positions.National Youth Program:Men’s 20s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMen’s 18s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerWomen’s 20s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerWomen’s 18s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMixed 18s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerMixed 20s Coach, Assistant Coach and ManagerCoach and Assistant CoachTo submit your Expression of Interest (EOI) for all coaching positions please click on the link below. The link will take you to a page to submit your details for the application.https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/youthprogram2020The EOI will include:NameContact DetailsNCAS Coaching LevelPrevious Elite level (only) Coaching ExperienceVarious questions which can be found by clicking the above link.Expressions of interest for these coaching positions will close at 5pm Monday 4th March, 2019.Team ManagerTo submit your Expression of Interest (EOI) for the team manager positions please click on the link below. The link will take you to a page to submit your details for the application.https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/youthmanager2020Expressions of interest for these positions will close at 5pm Monday 4th March 2019.Appointment TermsThe appointment term for these positions will be from date of appointment in 2019 through to completion of all responsibilities after the 2020 Youth Trans Tasman. This campaign will involve attendance by the appointed Coaches and Managers at all team and national selection camps throughout the Trans Tasman preparation.Appointment ConsiderationsAs an Australian coaching staff member there will be a large emphasis on interaction across the program, innovation within coaching and constant professional development.  This will require a need for individuals who are willing to participate in a collaborative environment, with high levels of accountability, adherence to improving technical knowledge and a focus on leadership and management.The appointment processes for all volunteers within the HP Program, takes into account the balance of the applicants’ current skills and areas for improvement.  In the same way coaches select athletes to fit a role within a team plan, volunteers will be selected and required to full fill the role to deliver success for Touch Football Australia.Outlined below for your information is the prescribed key selection criteria for all volunteer appointments within TFA:Actively work as leaders within the broader organisation, with an ability to promote positive/collaborative working relationships and represent the organisation in a professional manner.Actively promote a positive culture among the appointed group, reflective of the organisation’s expectations for all participants within the sport, and above all else in line with TFA Code of Conduct and other policies.Display an ability to work independently as well as within a team environment.Actively communicate and prepare for specific requirements of the role.Complete agreed assigned tasks to the expected standard of the organisation.Maintain absolute confidence with any confidential or Intellectual Property related information of the organisation.Hold and/or obtain required accreditations to undertake the role.Support TFA in the coordination and development of other volunteers.Aiding in conflict resolution as required.Photography: Phil McIlwraithlast_img read more

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10 months agoRangers, Celtic rival Burnley, Huddersfield for Fran Sol

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Rangers, Celtic rival Burnley, Huddersfield for Fran Solby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWillem II striker Fran Sol is a target for a raft of British clubs.The Mirror says the 26-year-old, currently plying his trade in Holland with Willem II, is one of the Eredivisie’s top-scorers with 12 goals already to his name.Sol is nominally out-of-contract at the end of the season, although there is a one-year option in favour of his club who are certain to activate it given his current form.Celtic and Rangers have both sent scouts to watch him during the past few months.But they are not alone. Burnley, Cardiff, Huddersfield, Leeds, Derby and Swansea have also checked on him. last_img read more

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10 months agoBarcelona midfielder Rakitic: Valverde must decide his future

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona midfielder Rakitic: Valverde must decide his futureby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona midfielder Ivan Rakitic says the players are happy playing for coach Ernesto Valverde.Valverde’s deal is up in the summer but he does have an option to extend it by an additional year. The coach says a decision will be made with the club later in the season.”It’s an issue for the boss and the club [to decide on],” Rakitic said. “We’re really happy with him and the whole coaching setup.”The most normal [scenario] would be that he continues with us, but we have to focus on our job, which is playing and winning football games. Let them [the club and Valverde] decide what’s for the best.” last_img read more

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20 days agoMan Utd boss Solskjaer ready to roll dice on Juventus veteran Mandzukic

first_imgMan Utd boss Solskjaer ready to roll dice on Juventus veteran Mandzukicby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is ready to roll the dice on Juventus veteran Mario Mandzukic.Since his permanent appointment to the United hotseat in March, Solskjaer has young, hungry British players, in a move away from recruiting star names, says the Mirror.In the summer, United signed centre-half Harry Maguire from Leicester City, right-back Aaron Wan-Bissaka from Crystal Palace , and winger Daniel James from Swansea.United were also in talks over signing Mandzukic, and are to renew their pursuit of the 33-year-old after their failure to sign replacements for Romelu Lukaku and Alexis Sanchez left Solskjaer came back to bite them.The gamble backfired after first-choice forwards Marcus Rashford and Anthony Martial were both injured, leaving 17-year-old Mason Greenwood to lead the line. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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8 days ago​Nketiah reveals Arsenal in constant contact during Leeds loan

first_img​Nketiah reveals Arsenal in constant contact during Leeds loanby Ansser Sadiq8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveArsenal loanee Eddie Nketiah says that he is constantly in contact with members of the club while on loan at Leeds United.The 20-year-old is struggling for game time at the Elland Road club in the Championship.And Nketiah says that he is still focusing on his long term future at Arsenal, which is highlighted by how they are keeping tabs on him during the loan spell.He told reporters: “I speak with Arsenal a lot, I’m in contact with quite a few people in the club, they’re always texting when I’ve done well or things I can do differently but I think it’s good to have that constant feedback from the club, to know you’re still connected with them.”I’m an Arsenal player on loan at Leeds, I feel like they have done really well to keep me involved and happy and I think they’ve been really happy with me so hopefully I can continue the form and go back and get a starting place and kick off from there.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Key recommendations from the public inquiry into Elizabeth Wettlaufer

first_imgA public inquiry examining the case of Elizabeth Wettlaufer, a serial-killer nurse who preyed on elderly patients in her care, has issued a report aimed at preventing such crimes in the future. Here are some key recommendations from the 91 listed in the report:— The government of Ontario should ensure that a strategic plan is in place to build awareness of the health-care serial killer phenomenon.— The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care should create new, permanent funding for long-term care homes for training, education, and professional development for those caring for residents.— The ministry should expand the parameters of the funding it gives homes for nursing and personal care to allow them to spend it on a broader spectrum of staff, including pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.— It should create a three-year program under which homes can apply for grants of $50,000 to $200,000, based on their size, to improve visibility and tracking of medication.— The ministry should refine its performance assessment program for long-term care facilities to better identify those struggling to provide a safe and secure environment.— It should conduct a study to determine adequate levels of registered nursing staff in long-term care facilities and table the findings by July 31, 2020. If the study shows a need for additional staffing to ensure residents’ safety, homes should receive more government funding.— Long-term care homes should analyze medication-related incidents and adverse drug events through a framework that includes screening for possible intentional harm.— Homes should document and track the use of glucagon, a hormone that raises a person’s blood sugar, to identify patterns and trends.— Facilities should require that directors of nursing conduct unannounced spot checks on evening and night shifts, including weekends.— Homes must maintain a complete discipline history for each employee so management can easily review it while making discipline decisions.— The Office of the Chief Coroner and the Ontario Forensic Pathology Service should replace the current form submitted when a long-term care patient dies with a redesigned, evidence-based death record that includes whether aspects of the resident’s decline or death were inconsistent with the expected medical trajectory.— They should also develop protocols on the involvement of forensic pathologists in death investigations of long-term care residents, as well as a standardized protocol for autopsies performed on the elderly.— The College of Nurses of Ontario should revise its policies and procedures to reflect the possibility that a health-care provider might intentionally harm those in their care.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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VANCOUVER SCREEN SCENE ICE NO TOMORROW DATE MY DAD AND MORE

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment ‘Twas the week before Christmas and all through the city, not a production was stirring, not even a miniseries.Well, not quite. But a number of productions are taking a break for the holiday season and several are wrapping up.That said, the new year will bring a number of new productions to the city, and we’ve already got one on our radar. Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook One of the new TV productions kicking off in 2017 will be Date My Dad.This family dramedy starts shooting on January 17 and continues until April 12.The series follows Ricky Parker, whose beloved wife died three years ago. Since that time, Ricky’s sole agenda has been to devote himself to his three daughters, aged 10, 13, and 15 years old.Although his mother-in-law has been helping him raise the girls, she has decided to move away.However, the girls have some plans of their own as they try to find a girlfriend for their father as he turns 40 years old.But it’ll be a crash course, as he hasn’t dated for two decades. Luckily for him, his girls will be there to give him advice—which, considering their tender ages and inexperience themselves, may not be the best thing.The cast is yet to be announced.Meanwhile, another production in which teens lead the way—though through some much darker territory—finished up its shoot.The Canadian horror-comedy feature film Dead Shack, directed by Vancouver filmmaker Peter Ricq, wrapped up on December 17.last_img read more

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Jerry OConnell is American but he takes pride in his new Canadian

first_img Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: O’Connell also calls Carter “sort of the procedural Schitt’s Creek,” referencing the CBC comedy. “If there was a murder a week on Schitt’s Creek it would be Carter.” So how does Jerry O’Connell stack up as an American actor playing a Canadian in a TV series that’s set in Ontario?Try this for Great White North bona fides: he suggests a crossover episode between his new show, Carter, which debuts May 15 at 8 p.m. on Bravo, and CraveTV hoser hit Letterkenny, which he calls one of the best shows on TV.It could be “the hockey players finding a body,” O’Connell says. “Coach is gonna be a suspect, he’s gonna freak out when he’s getting interrogated in the box,” he adds, referring to Mark Forward’s notoriously hot-tempered Letterkenny character.center_img Advertisement From left, Kristian Bruun, Jerry O’Connell, Sydney Tamiia Poitier and Brenda Kamino in Carter. (BROOKE PALMER / BELL MEDIA) Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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Judge Redo part of analysis for Dakota Access pipeline

first_imgLand protectors fought pitched battles with Local, and State police, elements of private security firms and the National Guard to try and stop the Dakota Access Pipline. Photo: Dennis Ward/APTNThe Canadian PressU.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in a 91-page decision that the Corps failed to take into account how a spill might affect “fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline’s effects are likely to be highly controversial.”The judge said the Army must redo its environmental analysis in certain sections and he’ll consider later whether the pipeline must halt operations in the meantime. A status conference is scheduled for next week.Dave Archamabault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which has led opposition to the pipeline, called it “a significant victory.”Developer Energy Transfer Partners announced earlier this month that it started shipping oil to customers. ETP maintains that the 1,200-mile pipeline is safe, but the Standing Rock Cheyenne River, Yankton and Oglala Sioux tribes in the Dakotas fear environmental harm.ETP spokeswoman Vicki Granado did not immediately return email and phone messages seeking comment on Boasberg’s ruling. U.S. Department of Justice spokeswoman Nicole Navas Oxman said the department is reviewing the ruling.The decision marks “an important turning point,” said Jan Hasselman, attorney for the non-profit Earthjustice, which is representing the tribes in the lawsuit.“Until now, the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have been disregarded by builders of the Dakota Access pipeline and the Trump Administration … prompting a well-deserved global outcry,” Hasselman said.The project led to months of demonstrations near the Standing Rock Reservation and hundreds of protesters were arrested. The protests died off with the clearing of the main encampment in February and the completion of the pipeline.Boasberg rejected two earlier complaints by the tribes. One was that the construction threatened sites of cultural and historical significance and the other was that the presence of oil in the pipeline under Lake Oahe would desecrate sacred waters and make it impossible for the tribes to freely exercise their religious beliefs.“Now that the court has rejected these two lines of attack, Standing Rock and Cheyenne River here take their third shot, this time zeroing in DAPL’s environmental impact,” Boasberg wrote. He added later, “This volley meets with some degree of success.”The corps originally declined to issue an easement for drilling and earlier this year launched a full environmental study of the Lake Oahe crossing, which it said would take up to two years to complete. Boasberg, the federal judge, had rejected an ETP request to stop the study.“As we all know, elections have consequences, and the government’s position on the easement shifted significantly once President Trump assumed office on January 20, 2017,” Boasberg wrote in Wednesday’s ruling.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Initial public offerings scheduled to debut next week

first_imgNEW YORK — The following is a list of initial public offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include IPO ETF manager Renaissance Capital, and SEC filings.Week of Dec. 10.360 Finance – Shanghai, China, 3.1 million shares, priced $16.50-$18.50, managed by Citi/Haitong. Proposed NYSE symbol: QFIN. Business: Chinese online consumer lending platform partnered with 360 Group (Qihoo).CF Finance Acquisition – New York, 25 million shares, priced at $10, managed by Cantor Fitzgerald. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CFFAU. Business: Blank check company formed by the CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald.CURE Pharmaceutical Holding – Oxnard, Calif., 2 million shares, priced $5-$7, managed by Network 1 Financial Securities. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CURR. Business: Developing oral dissolving film formulations of existing drugs.Chardan Healthcare Acquisition – New York, 7 million shares, priced at $10, managed by Chardan Capital Markets. Proposed NYSE symbol: CHACU. Business: Blank check company formed by Chardan to acquire a healthcare business.Cornerstone Management – Guangzhou, China, 5 million shares priced at $4, managed by ViewTrade. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CSCA. Business: China-based private equity fund manager.Legacy Housing – Bedford, Texas, 3.5 million shares, priced $10.75-12.75, managed by B. Riley FBR/Oak Ridge Financial. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: LEGH. Business: Builds, sells and finances manufactured homes.Moderna – Cambridge, Mass., 26.3 million shares, priced $22-$24, managed by Morgan Stanley/Goldman Sachs. Proposed Nasdaq symbol MRNA. Business: Early-stage biotech developing therapies based on its modified mRNA platform.Schultze Acquisition – Rye Brook, N.Y., 15 million shares, priced at $10, managed by EarlyBirdCapital/BTIG. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: SAMAU. Business: Blank check company formed by distressed debt investor George Schultze.Synthorx – La Jolla, Calif., 11.9 million shares, priced $10-$12, managed by Jefferies/Leerink Partners. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: THOR. Business: Principal biotech developing immunotherapies for solid tumors.Tencent Music Entertainment – Shenzhen, China, 82 million shares, priced $13-$15, managed by Morgan Stanley/Goldman Sachs (Asia). Proposed NYSE symbol: TME. Business: China’s largest online music-streaming service.Uranium Trading – El Segundo, Calif., 4.5 million shares, priced at $10, managed by B. Riley FBR. Proposed NYSE symbol: UTC. Business: Newly-formed vehicle investing in the civil uranium market.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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The PRRD allows Old Fort Residents to return home

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Peace River Regional District Board of Directors has given most Old Fort Residents approval to return to their homes starting today.In a special meeting on Sunday, the Board received a summary report from Westrek Geotechnical Services.  The report said the landslide will to continue to move “Based on present conditions, the potential for the massive rockslide to move again is high, possibly causing the earthflow and both adjacent landslides to also move.”The report goes onto say “A larger rockslide could reach the temporary access road but does not pose any imminent risk to any houses.” The Board of Directors voted in favour of letting residents back into their homes, except for one property located 7605 Old Fort Road.  This has been the only home damaged by the slide.Residents will now a attend a meeting at the Northern Grand Hotel where the PRRD will discuss the re-entry plan. Some residents will be allowed home starting at 3 p.m. Sunday.More to come…last_img read more

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Hattrick for Suntec Singapore at the CEI Asia Industry Awards 2011

first_imgSuntec Singapore Source = Suntec Singapore Fresh from a string of awards in the last quarter of 2010,Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre (Suntec Singapore) has onceagain received the honours for being voted as “Asia’s Best Convention and ExhibitionCentre” and “Best MICE Sales Team” at the CEI Asia Industry Awards 2011.The awards are presented by CEI Asia – the region’s leading magazine for the Meetings,Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE) industry. The annual CEI Asia Industry Awardsare voted by the magazine’s astute readers whose profile includes MICE buyers, planners andinfluencers in the Asia-Pacific region.“We are honoured to be recognised as one of Asia’s top convention and exhibitioncentres once again for the third consecutive year. This accolade is significant as it endorses ourproduct and services offerings amidst rapid industry growth. This award further solidifies theSuntec brand – allowing us to keep improving on our standards,” says Pieter Idenburg, ChiefExecutive Officer of Suntec Singapore.Suntec Singapore has consistently remained tops for the third year running.“We are privileged to receive this recognition once again for the third consecutive year. Thishonour is a clear endorsement for our team as they attest to the industry’s warm appreciation ofus – allowing us in our unceasing quest to cater to and improve our products and serviceofferings for our clients,” commented Mr Ong Wee Min, Director of Commercial.Suntec Singapore emerged from an extraordinary year in 2010 – having hosted a total of 1,536events, welcomed approximately 6.8 million visitors to the venue and hauled in copious awardsand accolades.What a great start for what looks set to be a remarkable year!last_img read more

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On Monday Farhad Javid will meet with Afghan Pres

first_imgOn Monday, Farhad Javid will meet with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and his wife, Rula Ghani, to ask whether the president will order the release of some 190 women and girls who are currently in jail for failing a virginity test.Javid is Afghanistan’s country director for Marie Stopes International, a global family planning organization. Five months ago, he and three colleagues visited the Mazar-i-Sharif prison and went from cell to cell to count the number of women and girls who had been jailed for failing the test. In Afghanistan, premarital sex is considered a moral crime. The issue of virginity testing is not confined to Afghanistan. This week, the U.N., along with the World Health Organization, U.N. Women and U.N. Human Rights, called for a global ban on the practice. Virginity tests have been documented in at least 20 countries around the world, including Egypt, Indonesia and South Africa. And according to the U.N., increased globalization in the past century has resulted in requests for and cases of virginity testing in countries that had no previous history of the practice, for example, Belgium, the Netherlands and the U.K. The test is administered for a variety of reasons: to determine whether a woman can go to school, get married, get a job — or whether she is a victim of rape. According to the U.N., virginity tests are often performed by inspecting the hymen for tears or for the size of its opening, or inserting fingers into the vagina, to determine whether a girl or woman has had sex.WHO states that there is no evidence that the test can prove that a person has had vaginal intercourse or not.”This medically unnecessary, and often times painful, humiliating and traumatic practice must end,” the U.N. announced in a statement at the World Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Rio de Janeiro.In its statement, the U.N. called these tests a violation of human rights and a form of gender discrimination: “The social expectation that girls and women should remain ‘virgins’ is based on stereotyped notions that female sexuality should be curtailed within marriage. This notion is harmful to women and girls globally.”In Afghanistan, the test is sometimes administered if a girl does something as simple as walking down the street with a boy, says Javid.That’s what happened to a 13-year-old girl that Javid and his team from Maria Stopes met at the prison in Mazar-i-Sharif, the country’s fourth-largest city. The young teenager told a female member of the team that she was stopped by the police, accused of having sex and subjected to a virginity test. She says she failed the exam and was sent to prison.Even the act of undergoing the test can have alarming consequences, says Javid. In talking with women and girls, he has been told that even if someone is determined to be a virgin, her “reputation is tarnished,” he says. “The family of the girl will think, ‘You have brought shame to our family and village.’ “In Afghanistan, the law states that women who fail the exam can be incarcerated for a maximum of three months. But, says Javid, “many are kept inside the jail for a year and a half — for nothing.”After hearing reports from some of the prisoners, including the 13-year-old, of sexual abuse by wardens and prison guards, Javid sent two doctors to the prison to perform physical and psychosocial exams. The doctors told him that many girls and women reported they had been sexually abused by prison staff.Javid and Marie Stopes Afghanistan are taking steps to tackle the issue.That’s what the U.N. is recommending in its statement: The onus of eliminating virginity tests should be on local governments, working in tandem with rights groups, activists and nonprofit organizations. Together, “they’ll create the tools and policies and provide the support on a national level,” says Nazneen Damji, policy adviser on health at U.N. Women.In July, the government of Afghanistan approved an official public health policy that Marie Stopes Afghanistan helped draft in an effort to stop enforcement of the law that allows women to be jailed on the basis of the virginity test. Aimed at doctors and medical professionals, the policy states that virginity tests are ineffective and unscientific as a means to ascertain whether a woman is a virgin.Over the next three months the group will use funding from the Swedish government to train hospital directors in 19 provinces in the new policy. Marie Stopes doctors at these facilities, who provide family planning services, will also monitor to ensure that no virginity tests are administered.”The doctors will be discouraged to carry out any of the tests with us being there,” says Javid. So if a police officer were to bring in a woman for such testing, the doctor could refuse.Javid also hopes to convince Islamic community leaders that the test is ineffective. In November, he and his team are planning to hold meetings with leaders in four cities in Afghanistan, with subsequent visits to leaders in 19 of the country’s 34 provinces as well as some rural areas controlled by the Taliban.Javid thinks about the 13-year-old girl he saw at the prison. When he visited her, she was packed into a tiny cell with 15 or 16 other women, he says.”The poor girl was so small, just a teenager,” he says. “She looked like a pigeon with its wings all tied up.”Upon reflecting on the girl’s story, he says, “We hope we will be able to convince the president and his wife this Monday.”He knows the U.N.’s mandate to ban virginity tests won’t matter “to people on a provincial level.””But when you meet informed politicians, it absolutely matters,” he says. “We can use it to our benefit.” Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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Virginia Gov Ralph Northam is embroiled in contro

first_imgVirginia Gov. Ralph Northam is embroiled in controversy for admitting that he wore blackface at a party in the 1980s and for a racist photo on his medical school yearbook page. But the governor, a pediatric neurologist by training, told CBS he isn’t resigning, because “Virginia needs someone that can heal. There’s no better person to do that than a doctor.”NPR spoke with another doctor, Damon Tweedy, about what message it sends to black patients to hear a prominent doctor tell the country that he has worn blackface. Tweedy is the author of Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine and is an associate professor of psychiatry at Duke University.The debate in Virginia is only one episode in a long history of racism in medicine, Tweedy says. Many African-Americans may feel distrustful of physicians, stemming in part from the legacy of the infamous Tuskegee syphilis experiment. This distrust has repercussions for the health of black people in America today, who may be less likely to stick with treatments or participate in medical research.Tweedy says he hopes the debate will generate more open conversations about the way bias works its way into the health care system.Our interview has been edited for clarity and length.What’s your response to the photo with the guy in blackface and the other guy in Klansman robes in a medical school yearbook?The first thought I had was what that might mean for the patients. One of the problems is that if we just sort of make it all about Gov. Northam, that in some ways kind of misses the point. Someone had to take that photo; someone had to put that into a yearbook. And you think about it, that medical school was in a community that at the time — even now — was 40 percent African-American.What does that mean for those patients, that there’s this tacit acceptance of these attitudes about race? And further, 1984 is not that long ago. People are still in practice who trained in 1984. Many of them are the generation that supervised me as I was coming in, training.Lay out for me briefly, what the history of tension is between the American medical community and African-Americans? It dates back to the beginnings of our country, in some ways. The most famous example in modern times is the Tuskegee syphilis experiment, which basically was run by the U.S. Public Health Service and investigated the natural history of syphilis in African-American men. Even after treatment was available, the researchers never notified the men that they had syphilis or that there was treatment available. It was the most egregious example that we know of.But in some ways it follows a much larger history of concerns, not just in the research realm but in the clinical realm. It’s very much an oral history among African-American people. You often find that people have a concern or mistrust that they are being experimented upon or that the medical establishment in some way doesn’t have their best interest at heart.When you were in medical school back in the ’90s, was race ever addressed in the curriculum or in practical training in your residency? During that time there was just starting to be those conversations. Maybe an hour, out of a four-year curriculum, an hour or two. Think about that. I think that a lot of times people think that if you’re a doctor, you’re very intelligent, you’re sophisticated, and somehow you’re not as susceptible to these issues of bias and racism in a way that other people might be. I think that’s shortsighted.I’m a professor myself, and I’ve used this recent event as a sort of a teaching opportunity. You know, had discussions with students where we’ve sort of really openly talked about what do these issues mean.I wonder if you have any advice for Gov. Northam, one doctor to another? I’m not sure how much he might listen to me, but I’m less interested in the idea of him resigning or not. Regardless of what happens there, he does need to find a way to use his story, not out of self-interest but in terms of moving forward the conversation in other medical schools and medical settings. How might someone who thinks that they’ve been well meaning and educated and all that sort of thing, how might they still have made mistakes that could have potentially harmed people?What are the most glaring racial health disparities you see today in your teaching or in your practice?I’m in psychiatry, personally, but it really transcends every medical specialty. There’s been a body of research that shows that these disparities come across in every way because really they derive from society … from social inequality, economic inequality. That so much drives the kind of care people can receive, where they can receive it, if they can receive it at all. It really cuts across every specialty. Doctors need to learn that they’re part of this larger social world.Justine Kenin produced and Selena Simmons-Duffin edited the audio version of this interview. Mara Gordon produced and edited it for web.Mara Gordon is a family physician in Washington, D.C., and a health and media fellow at NPR and Georgetown University School of Medicine. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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How do you get ahead in BangladeshOften its by l

first_imgHow do you get ahead in Bangladesh?Often it’s by leaving Bangladesh.An estimated 10 million Bangladeshis are currently working abroad, primarily as low-skilled laborers in the Arabian Gulf. Only India, Mexico, Russia and China send out more migrant workers each year according to the World Bank.The Bangladeshi migrant workers are gardeners, construction workers, janitors and maids. On average they earn $400 a month, far more than they’d make doing the same jobs at home. And the totals add up. The $15 billion sent home by migrant workers last year — called “remittances” in economic jargon — is Bangladesh’s second-largest source of foreign earnings after its gigantic textile industry.But their months or years abroad can turn into misery, with stories of scams, exploitation and abuse, according to labor activists and human rights groups.Getting in lineAn entire industry has developed in Bangladesh to recruit, screen and process workers who yearn to go abroad.Outside a two-story office building on the eastern side of the capital, Dhaka, young men hoping to get jobs in the Arabian Gulf are waiting on the street. Before they can finalize a labor contract they have to get poked, prodded and fingerprinted at a branch office of the Gulf Approved Medical Centres Association.The job seekers are given physical exams at the Saudi-run agency to make sure they are fit to work. They are screened for HIV, TB and other infectious diseases. If they test positive, they’re barred from working in the Gulf (an official in the GAMCA office says they can still find work somewhere else in the world). Women have to take a pregnancy exam and are excluded if they’re pregnant.The agency uploads their fingerprints and travel documents into a centralized database that will be available to immigration authorities in the countries the workers are sent to.One of the applicants on a recent April day is Mohammad Kiron Mia, who is trying to get a job as a gardener in Oman.For Mia, 36, this will be his third trip overseas. During the first he worked as a tailor in Oman for seven months. Then he returned on a two-year contract as a gardener.”We are poor people,” he says of himself and several neighbors from his village who are with him outside the agency. He is hoping to return to Oman: “The jobs in Oman are better opportunities for us because the work permit costs far less than a permit for Saudi Arabia or Dubai.”Permit fees are based on the destination and job and can cost thousands of dollars.”I want to make a better life for my family and my children,” he says. “I can make twice as much money working in Oman compared to working here in Bangladesh.”The GAMCA office where Mia has come to submit his paperwork is one of 46 across Bangladesh that process workers exclusively for Gulf countries. Other labor brokers with other agencies set up jobs for Bangladeshis seeking to work in India, Malaysia, Singapore and other parts of Asia.”Bangladesh is one of the top 10 countries in the world for migration and remittance according to World Bank,” says Shariful Islam Hasan, head of migration for BRAC, Bangladesh’s largest nonprofit development and social service agency. Hasan says remittances are hugely important to Bangladesh. A single migrant’s wages help provide education, health care and food for that worker’s family. Bangladeshis will work abroad sometimes for five, 10, even 20 years, he says, to try to attain a better life.”You will not find a single person in Bangladesh who doesn’t have someone — a relative, someone — abroad,” he says. “So everyone is very much involved with this migration and remittances process.”One of the great benefits of remittances, Hasan says, is that unlike the money brought into the country by exports from the garment industry, this money is dispersed all across Bangladesh.Yet Bangladesh is still one of the poorest countries in the world. Despite recent progress, per capita income remains below $2,000 a year. Broken promisesHasan says there are many hazards for foreign workers. Some are scammed by job brokers who overcharge them for visas, flights and work permits. Others sign up to do one type of work — for instance driving a delivery van in Abu Dhabi — and end up toiling long hours instead outside in scorching heat on a construction site in Dubai. Women primarily find jobs as maids and housecleaners. Hasan says women are often overworked and subjected to physical, emotional and even sexual abuse.”If you don’t get a holiday, if you don’t have food or what you need — according to the definition of modern-day slavery, this is one kind of slavery,” he says.Mim Akter Tania, 22, knows this all too well. Tania shares an apartment with her husband, daughter and another young married couple in a crowded part of the Bangladesh capital known as Old Dhaka. When Tania got a contract last year to work as a custodian at a hospital in Saudi Arabia, she was incredibly excited.”At that time we didn’t have much money so I thought that going to Saudi Arabia might give us a better chance to live a good life,” she says.She hoped she could move up from mopping floors at the hospital to working as a nurse’s assistant or a medical technician. She sent her daughter, just a year old at the time, to live with her mother and signed a two-year contract to work in Saudi Arabia.But when Tania got to Riyadh there was no job in a hospital.Instead she was sent to work as domestic servant.She says that after she worked all day at her boss’s house, he would send her in the evening to clean his brother’s house.”I knew I had to do the work but my employer was not a good human being,” Tania says. “He often beat me and behaved very rudely toward me.”When the boss and his brother tried to rape her, she says, she ran away and went to the Saudi police.But the police just brought her back to her employer’s house.Two months after she arrived, she says, her boss pushed her off a balcony. The fall broke her leg. From the hospital Tania got in touch with the Bangladeshi Embassy, which moved her to a safe house full of other Bangladeshi women who had also fled their employers and were waiting to go home.Her salary was supposed to be $160 a month plus room and board, but she says, “I never got any payment for the work I did there. None.”Hasan from BRAC’s migration program and other worker advocates say that Tania’s experience is far too common. Bangladesh has come to rely so heavily on the money that workers send home every month, Hasan says, that mistreatment and abuse are often overlooked.Underage workersAt times even children get pulled into the foreign worker system.At the Kurmitola General Hospital near the international airport in Dhaka, the Begum family is gathered on a row of blue plastic benches in the ground floor waiting room. Their daughter, who they say is 16, is huddled next to her mother. She is wearing a black burqa with no head covering over a filthy hooded sweatshirt. She has bruises on her left cheek and a cut at the base of her neck. A small duffel bag with a checked-luggage tag still wrapped around the handle sits at the girl’s feet. She refuses to speak. Her mother, Minara, says she and her husband hadn’t heard from their daughter in months when she suddenly called from Saudi Arabia saying she was coming home.Minara says this whole saga started months ago with a woman named Beauty, who came to the Begum family’s village and offered to get Minara’s daughter a job cleaning houses in Dhaka. While the family no longer heard from their daughter regularly, every month Beauty sent them 16,000 taka, almost $200.Minara says her daughter was 15 when she left their village with Beauty. Now, just a matter of months later the girl is holding a passport that lists her age as 26.Her parents believe that Beauty must have arranged for the fake passport. Minara and her husband brought the teenager straight to this hospital from the airport, but she won’t let the doctors or nurses touch her. She refused to go into a small examination room and is scared to enter the stalls in the hospital’s public restrooms.All her daughter will tell them, Minara says, is that she wants to go home.Minara is still trying to understand what happened to her daughter, what horrors she experienced. One of the things that made Minara think her daughter was OK was that every month her wages arrived like clockwork. Minara had no idea that that money was coming from Saudi Arabia — and that it was part of the hundreds of millions of dollars in foreign remittances flowing every month into Bangladesh. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

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Work and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith dism

first_imgWork and pensions secretary Iain Duncan Smith dismissed an offer from the equality watchdog to help MPs and peers understand the true impact on disabled people and other groups of his new welfare bill.Letters between the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) and Duncan Smith (pictured) were published this week on the commission’s website, following a freedom of information request.They show that Duncan Smith snubbed an offer from the commission to “work more closely” on the equality impact assessments his department had already published alongside his welfare reform and work bill.In her letter sent in September, Rebecca Hilsenrath, EHRC’s interim chief executive, had asked Duncan Smith “what your thoughts are on ensuring that the impact assessments are sufficient to address these issues and support the proper scrutiny of the bill”.In his response last month, Duncan Smith ignored her offer of assistance and told her that the impact assessments already use “the most robust analysis available to give a good assessment of both the rationale for and the impacts of the reforms” in the bill.In a briefing on its website, EHRC says it is concerned that parts of the welfare reform and work bill “could exacerbate, rather than reduce, existing inequalities”.It says it is concerned that the impact assessments and human rights memorandum which accompany the bill “do not fully assess the effect of the bill on equality and human rights”, which “may make it difficult for parliamentarians to properly consider the implications of the measures in the bill”.The watchdog also says the government should review welfare reform measures in the bill – including the proposed reduction of the benefit cap, the freeze on many benefit rates, and the WRAG cut – so it can assess how they comply with the government’s international human rights obligations, including the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.An EHRC spokesman said: “We continue to raise our concerns and make representations on this issue.“Our latest position is set-out in the briefing we provided to parliamentarians this week.“For example, at Commons report stage we urged MPs to support an amendment which would have prevented implementation of the bill until an assessment of the cumulative impact and impact on equality of reforms to tax credits and benefits announced in the 2015 summer budget is presented to both Houses of Parliament.“This makes clear that the commission is concerned that the impact assessments and human rights memorandum which accompany the bill do not fully assess the effect of the bill on equality and human rights.”The letters were published as the bill began its progress through the House of Lords, with one Tory peer saying she was appalled by the wording of the government’s impact assessment of its proposed cut of £29 a week for future claimants placed in the work-related activity group (WRAG) of employment and support allowance.The assessment says the cut would “remove the financial incentives that could otherwise discourage claimants from taking steps back to work”.Baroness Browning, who has a son with autism, told the welfare reform minister Lord Freud: “I am disgusted with those words.”Despite her comments, Lord Freud spoke in the debate of the “perverse incentives” of paying disabled people in the WRAG more than people on the mainstream jobseeker’s allowance.The disabled peers Lord [Colin] Low and Baroness [Tanni] Grey-Thompson, along with their fellow crossbench peer Baroness Meacher, are heading a parliamentary review into how the proposed WRAG cut might affect disabled people.Lord Low dismissed the bill as “another round of ideologically-driven cuts to welfare”, and told fellow peers that the government’s target of cutting another £12 billion from benefits spending “cannot but have a devastating impact on poor people who depend on benefits”.Baroness Grey-Thompson suggested that the WRAG cut could move disabled people further from the workplace, by creating an incentive for them to be placed in the ESA support group, where there would be limited employment support available to them.She added: “I struggle to see how cutting support could incentivise disabled people into work, and I am looking forward to the DWP’s convincing arguments in this area.”In response to criticisms of the WRAG cut, Lord Freud quoted a 10-year-old report by the OECD which said that “financial incentives to work can be improved by either cutting welfare benefit levels, or introducing in-work benefits while leaving benefit levels unchanged”, although it was not clear whether this referred to disabled benefit claimants.He added: “This change, combined with the new funding [the government plans to spend an extra £100 million a year of the £640 million savings from the WRAG cut on improving employment support for disabled people] is about providing the right incentives and support to encourage more people to move closer to the labour market.”last_img read more

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JON Wilkin spoke about the fine margins of success

first_imgJON Wilkin spoke about the fine margins of success following Saints heartbreaking semi-final loss to Leeds.The champions were within 10 minutes of returning to Old Trafford until Ryan Hall scored off the back of a superb 40:20 from Kevin Sinfield.“At the top end of the game it is all about those,” he said. “They dictate whether you win or lose. The 40:20 was one of those moments and that is why Kevin Sinfield has been the player he is and gets the plaudits. He has built his career on being on the right side of those moments.“But we had opportunities to stop the try and didn’t.“On the whole I thought we were good and our effort was great, but we weren’t clinical enough and that cost us at the end of the game. We had chances and failed to capitalise on the good field position and possession in the first half. Leeds did the opposite and came up with the right play at the right time.“In all honesty we should have been further ahead. After James Roby scores we missed three or four opportunities then have away a penalty and charged a ball down to repeat the set.“There were a few big calls too. We were penalised for what was simultaneous contact on Cuthbertson and that was a shocking decision. But aside from that, Leeds were exceptional. They are a great side, champion club.”He continued: “We strive for success here. Every year we want to win the Challenge Cup and the Grand Final. I’m one of the leaders here and we need more leadership to help in the right situations like tonight.“We need some more experience at the club and I’d like to see that from the younger guys as we continue on. My job here is to bring that out.”last_img read more

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Sony Is Getting in on the Retro Gaming Craze With the PlayStation

first_img Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand 2 min read Patrick Carone Next Article Sony Is Getting in on the Retro Gaming Craze With the PlayStation Classic Image credit: Sony Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. –shares Entrepreneur Staffcenter_img Retro gaming is red hot.When Nintendo lauched the NES Classic at the end of 2016, it immediately became that holiday season’s must-have gift. Units of the $60 device sold out from stores and online merchants almost immediately, and unscrupulous retailers and re-sellers were offering them for hundreds of dollars a pop. Now, two years later, Sony is getting in on the action with a retro console of its own.Related: Where Do Great Ideas Come From?The PlayStation Classic will go on sale on Dec. 3, almost 25 years after it introduced the original PlayStation to the world. It was the first home console in video game history to ship 100 million units worldwide, and games such as Final Fantasy VII, Tekken 3 and Metal Gear Solid became instant classics.Here’s what we know about the console, via Sony:The console will come pre-loaded with 20 classic titles, including fan favorites such as Final Fantasy VII, Jumping Flash, Ridge Racer Type 4, Tekken 3 and Wild Arms. The mini console is approximately 45 percent smaller than the original PlayStation, and it emulates the original’s look and feel by featuring similar controllers and packaging. All of the pre-loaded games will be playable in their original format.Related: How to Stay Focused: Train Your BrainIn other words, it’s almost the same formula Nintendo used for its bestselling device. That is, it’s a miniature, hand-held unit with a similar look and controls to the original, and it comes pre-loaded with the system’s most popular games.Image credit: SonyThe PlayStation Classic is available for pre-order at select retailers for $99.99. Visit PlayStation.com for more details and the full lineup of titles. September 19, 2018 Gaming Will this be the hottest gift of the holiday season? Enroll Now for $5 Add to Queue Special Projects Directorlast_img read more

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Vision impairments may increase risk of falls in older adults

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 19 2018Vision impairment and blindness affect one in 11 Americans age 65 and older. Because our population is aging, the number of older adults with vision problems is predicted to rise. Older adults who have impaired vision may be at risk for decreased independence, poorer well-being, and an increased risk of falls. For example, in any given year, approximately 30 percent of adults over age 65 will fall. Having impaired vision more than doubles this risk.For older adults, falls are a major cause of illness and death. Even having a fear of falling is a challenge that can limit activity and worsen quality of life and independence as you age.However, we don’t have much information on how often visually impaired older adults experience a fall, and we have even less information about what happens to them after a fall. A team of researchers suggested that we need this information in order to understand the scope of the problem and create ways to prevent falls in visually impaired older adults.To learn more, the research team examined information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.Their goal was to provide up-to-date information on the frequency of falls. The team also wanted to learn more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments.Participants in the study were considered visually impaired if they had trouble recognizing someone across the street and/or reading newspaper print, even when using corrective lenses.Falls were defined as “any fall, slip, or trip” that involved losing balance and landing on the floor or ground or at a lower level. Participants were asked if they had any fall in the past month and if they fell more than once in the past 12 months. Fear of falling was determined by asking participants if they had worried about falling down in the last month. An additional question asked whether worrying about falling ever caused participants to limit their activities.Related StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsThe researchers also asked about the number of chronic conditions the participants had, including heart attack, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, lung disease, stroke, and cancer.The researchers concluded that falls, fear of falling, and limiting activity were considerably more common among older adults who were visually impaired.About 50 percent of people who said they had trouble seeing were afraid of falling and as a result, limited their activity. More than one in four older adults with vision problems had recurrent falls in the year before they were surveyed.The researchers said their study suggested that taking steps to prevent falls for older adults with vision problems was important and could limit the harmful consequences of falls for older adults. What’s more, helping older adults prevent falls might also slow declines in well-being, quality of life, and independence associated with a fear of falling.The researchers noted that vision impairment can be treated or even avoided in many cases, and they speculated that doing so might be a strategy to decrease falls and fall-related problems for some older adults with vision problems.”We need more information about falls and the fear of falling in older adults with vision problems. This will help us design public health and clinical interventions to address some of the key consequences of vision loss for older adults,” said study co-author Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH. Source:http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/having-poor-vision-can-raise-risk-for-falls-among-older-adults/last_img read more

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Study suggests usefulness of more flexible dose of regorafenib to relieve sideeffects

first_imgThis study will change clinical practice with regard to the use of regorafenib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, because it demonstrates and supports something that many clinicians have already observed and were carrying out in regular clinical practice”. In his opinion, the trial shows that this reduction in regorafenib initial dose limits the drug toxicity while maintaining its efficacy. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jul 7 2019Medical oncologists administer anticancer drug regorafenib to try to improve overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have ceased to respond to standard therapy (known as refractory mCRC). However, some of the adverse events related to the use of this drug often limits its use in clinical practice. A study reported at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer 2019 suggests the usefulness of a more flexible dosing, which improves patients’ quality of life without jeopardizing efficacy.This international trial, led by the Spanish Cooperative Group for the Treatment of Digestive Tumours (TTD), included 299 patients from over a dozen hospitals in Spain, Italy and France. The average age of the participants was 64 and they had received an average of four treatment lines prior to inclusion in the trial with regorafenib between July 2016 and September 2017.”Regorafenib has been approved since 2013 for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) who have progressed to standard treatments,” said study author, Dr. Guillem Argiles, medical oncologist and clinical investigator, Gastrointestinal & Endocrine Tumors Group, Vall d’Hebron University Hospital and Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Barcelona, Spain.”Its adverse toxicity profile often limits its use in routine clinical practice. This clinical trial attempted to show the usefulness of different dose strategies in order to improve its tolerability and quality of life in patients who can benefit from the medicine in the context of advanced disease.”In the trial, patients were randomized 1:1:1: standard dose 160 mg/day for three weeks followed by a week off; reduced dose of 120 mg/day for three weeks followed by a week off (reduced dose group); or intermittent dose of 160 mg/day a week, followed by a week off (intermittent dose group). The patients in the latter two groups (reduced or intermittent dose) were escalated to the standard of care dose if, after a first treatment cycle, no limiting toxicities that prevented to continuing to stay in the trial occurred. “We reduced the dose in the first cycle and then escalated because it has been shown that the toxicity is higher in the first and second months of treatment”, explained Argiles.Related StoriesNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedLung cancer screening using Google AI proves to be successfulGM fungus kills 99% of mosquitoes in Malaria-endemic region of AfricaThe investigators observed that flexible dosing showed numerical improvement on several parameters that improved tolerance, such as fatigue, hypertension or hand-foot syndrome (reaction due to redness, swelling and pain caused in the palms), although REARRANGE did not meet its primary endpoint of improving regorafenib global tolerability in the reduced and intermittent dose groups. The average treatment duration was 3.2 months in the standard group; 3.7 in the reduced dose group; and 3.8 in that with alternating weeks. Median progression-free survival was not different across groups (approximately 2 months).”Although statistical significance was not achieved, we did observe a numerical reduction in some side-effects that can be very troublesome for the patients”, explained Argiles. “These results, interpreted in the context of other trials, like the American study ReDOS (3), tell us that the more flexible doses of regorafenib are an effective alternative in order to improve quality of life in patients with metastatic refractory colorectal cancer”.Commenting on the results, Prof. Eric Van Cutsem, from the University Leuven, Belgium, said: Source:European Society for Medical Oncologylast_img read more

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