Saint Mary’s hosts 45th Annual Madrigal Dinners

first_imgOnce a year, the lounge of a Saint Mary’s residence hall is transformed to host a Renaissance-themed meal featuring a show with a holiday twist. The event will take place this weekend with the College’s 45th-annual madrigal dinners. The dinner consists of a three-course meal with stages of entertainment between, Nancy Menk, one of the dinner’s coordinators, said.“The Madrigal dinners are a recreation of a Renaissance era feast, probably [hosted] in some English manor house, overseen by royalty where there are a lot of performers that are gathered there for the evening,” she said.Throughout the evening, there will be performances from Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir, instrumentalists and Renaissance dancers. The dinner will also feature a play written by communication studies professor Susan Baxter and and produced by director of special events, Richard Baxter. The story revolves around the master of the house, his wife and the fool, Feste.History professor Bill Svelmoe said he is playing the role of Feste. “In this particular play, it’s the second one we’ve done in a series that follows this family,” Svelmoe said. “The master starts out very grumpy. He’s not in the Christmas spirit. So he welcomes everyone, but he’s grumpy about it and all the bills that are rolling in for this big meal. … The master … eventually gets into the Christmas spirit. It’s just this fun skit that weaves its way in and out during the meal.”Though Svelmoe is a part of the play, he said his favorite part of the dinners is the performance by the Saint Mary’s Women’s Choir.“It’s just fun to play the fool,” he said. “That’s a lot of fun, but I think just hearing the choir every year is probably my favorite part, especially at the very end when they sing ‘Silent Night.’ All the people at the feast join in. It’s just really, really lovely.”The dinners are the perfect way to kick off the holiday season, Svelmoe said.“It’s a fun way to start the Christmas season,” Svelmoe said. “I know it’s at a very busy time of year for students and people here at the college. … It’s just a terrific way to kick off Christmas.”Extending beyond Saint Mary’s into the South Bend community, the event gets people into the Christmas spirit, Menk said.“I see people in the audience there that I’ve seen every year for years,” she said. “They come and they start to bring their kids and their grandkids. It’s just something they do every holiday, and it’s become a tradition.”Menk said the traditional aspect of the dinner is one of her favorite things about the event. It brings back childhood memories of her father singing a carol from a madrigal dinner.“I love the procession of the boar’s head,” Menk said. “It represents the bringing in of the main course. It’s led by a procession of the boar’s head on a platter, and it processes all around the room. It’s very majestic, and we sing a beautiful carol about that called ‘The Boar’s Head Carol.’ “ … I love the looks on the people’s faces when that pig’s head comes around, especially the little kids. It’s just surprising to see that on the platter. It’s such a traditional part, and that’s probably my favorite part when that boar’s head comes out.”Though the dinner does not change much from year to year, Menk said the tradition is what keeps people coming back.“It doesn’t change much from year to year,” she said. “It’s a very traditional thing. People keep coming back because they just love it.”The final day to purchase tickets is Wednesday. Call the Saint Mary’s College box office to check for availability.Tags: christmas, Madrigal Dinner, Renaissance, Saint Mary’s Women’s Choirlast_img read more

What’s the problem?

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Have you ever been asked that question? More importantly (at least for this post) have you ever had to ask that question of colleagues or direct reports? If you’ve been in a leadership or management role for any considerable length of time, chances are pretty good that you have. Or, that you have wanted to.When I was a kid, I used to say things like, “Can’t you just be my friend?” to my parents. Their consistent response to me was that I already had enough friends – a not-so-subtle reminder that they were my parents and the buck stopped with them.Now let’s shift the conversation to the workplace. It is natural for leaders to want to be liked (even loved) by the people who work for them. There are exceptions to this, of course. There are still some leaders that would rather be feared. That’s no way to lead – but that is a topic for another day.Sometimes, in the course of wanting to be liked, some leaders fall into the trap of acting not like leaders, but like friends who don’t want to ruffle feathers or cause confrontation. I facilitate a lot of leadership development training and consultation and one of the most frequent questions that is asked of me is “how do you deal with an employee that has a bad attitude and doesn’t seem to want to work?” My answer to this, just like my parents’ answer to the “friend” question above is always the same. I instruct the questioner to meet privately with the employee and ask one simple but very direct question, “what’s the problem?” It’s certainly a blunt question. It requires a response. It gets directly to the point. It sends a message to the employee that you intend to hold them accountable for their behavior. continue reading »last_img read more

NCAA Basketball’s Final Four

first_imgThe city of Indianapolis has floated the idea of holding the NCAA ‘s Final Four in Indianapolis every year.  They gave several reasons why this would be a good idea.  First of all, it is a centrally located city.  A second reason is that Indianapolis really knows how to put on a show when it comes to major sporting events.  Remember the Super Bowl of a few years ago!The city of Indianapolis says they are a much cleaner city with less traffic than many of the other possible venues, such as Atlanta and Dallas.  The downtown area of Indianapolis is set up to handle not only the games but also housing, food services, and all the hoopla that goes with the Final Four.  Also, Indiana considers themselves the Basketball Capital of the United States!In order to sell this idea, Indianapolis would have to come up with a way to share some of the revenue that the other cities would be losing.  It is an interesting concept, and for us Hoosiers, it would make the Final Four much easier to attend.last_img read more