FA confirm they are not happy with Mourinho decision and will appeal

first_img Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars no dice Popular Premier League News Real Madrid ‘offer’ Isco to Chelsea in bid to ‘make room’ for Tottenham star REVEALED Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won huge blow Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City REAL DEAL Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card 1 The Football Association is appealing a decision made by an independent regulatory commission to clear Jose Mourinho of using foul language.The incident occurred at the end of Manchester United‘s Premier League match against Newcastle.After coming back to win 3-2 amid a backdrop of intense scrutiny about the Portuguese’s Old Trafford future, the 55-year-old manager was filmed in an animated mood.Footage showed Mourinho making comments in Portuguese, at one point looking into a camera, as he headed towards the tunnel after the final whistle on October 6, leading to an FA charge for using abusive, insulting or improper language. Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January deals REVEALED Footage showed Mourinho making comments in Portuguese, at one point looking into a camera, as he headed towards the tunnel after the final whistle on October 6, leading to an FA charge for using abusive, insulting or improper language tense Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? gameday cracker Did Mahrez just accidentally reveal Fernandinho is leaving Man City this summer? The United boss was cleared of that charge by an independent regulatory commission at a hearing on October 31, but the FA has now confirmed it has appealed that decision.A statement from the governing body read: “Having carefully considered the written reasons of the Independent Regulatory Commission relating to the case involving Jose Mourinho, the FA can confirm it is appealing the decision.” whoops shining last_img read more

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Rwanda: Marvel of growth and WEF Africa 2016 host

first_imgRwanda, the land of a thousand hills, has dramatically transformed since the 1994 genocide. The country is becoming a high-tech hub of sub-Saharan Africa and boasts one of the region’s fastest GDP growth rates. And now, from 11 to 13 May, the country’s capital of Kigali will host the 26th annual World Economic Forum on Africa.Rwanda’s capital city, Kigali, prepares to host the World Economic Forum on Africa. The global event, to run from 11 to 13 May, will be held at the Kigali Conference and Exhibition Village. (Image: Government of Rwanda)• African folklore explored in animated short film• Kenya’s take on Adele’s “Hello”• African history gets animation treatment• Infographic: Africa’s best brands• New video game developed in Africa Media Club South Africa reporterRwanda is one of the continent’s most competitive economies, having done much to improve the business environment. This remarkable progress is part of the country’s rapid evolution as a knowledge economy, powered by smart policies and investments. Nonetheless, further reforms and alliances are called for to accelerate development by leveraging digital transformation to expand socio-economic opportunities.The UN has designated 7 April, the start date of the 1994 Rwandan genocide against the Tutsi, in which 800 000 people were killed, as an annual day for the world to reflect on the unimaginable human suffering that took place over 100 days and in the aftermath.More than two decades on, Rwanda’s economy, left in tatters following the genocide, has come a long way. Today more than 60% of the population still live on less than $1.25 a day, but poverty has fallen rapidly. Rwandans are living healthier and wealthier lives.Here are five important things to know about Rwanda’s economy and society.1. Rapid growthOne of the fastest growing economies in Central Africa, Rwanda notched up GDP growth of around 8% a year between 2001 and 2014. In 2015, it was the fifth-fastest growing economy on the continent.Image: International Monetary FundThe IMF said Rwanda’s growth in 2015 was driven by construction, services, agriculture and manufacturing, but mining exports have slowed.The International Monetary Fund expects the economy to slow down this year and pick up in 2018, forecasting around 6% growth in 2016 compared with 6.9% last year.2. Reducing inequalityLife expectancy, literacy, primary school enrolment and spending on healthcare have all improved.Rwanda has also made big strides towards gender equality – almost 64% of parliamentarians are women, compared to just 22% worldwide – which has enabled women in the country to make economic advances. Women are now able to own land and girls can inherit from their parents.Image: Mary Alexander. Source: Inter-Parliamentary Union3. Poverty ratesRwanda reduced the percentage of people living below the poverty line from 57% in 2005 to 45% in 2010. Despite this, 63% of the population still live in extreme poverty, defined by the World Bank as less than $1.25 a day.4. Aid dependenceForeign aid to Rwanda increased significantly as the country began rebuilding itself after the genocide. A large chunk of government revenues – 30% to 40% of the budget – still comes from aid.The World Bank says Rwanda’s economy is vulnerable to fluctuations in foreign aid – growth fell to 4.7% in 2013 after some donors withheld aid over allegations in a 2012 UN report that the government was backing rebels in the Democratic Republic of Congo.5. From a farming to a knowledge economyCurrently around 83% of Rwanda’s population of 10.5 million live in rural areas and more than 70% of the population still work in subsistence farming. But the government wants to change this.In the long term, the government aims to transform Rwanda from a low-income agriculture-based economy to a knowledge-based, service-oriented economy with a middle-income status by 2020.South Africa will be sending a high-level delegation to Rwanda for the World Economic Forum on Africa this week. Follow the conversation at #SAinKigali.Source: World Economic Forum on Africa 2016last_img read more

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Empowering Parents to Become Effective Advocates

first_imgDownload a printable version of these tips and our checklist below!Tips to Empower Parents to Become Effective AdvocatesChecklist for Providers Empowering Parents to be Effective AdvocatesReferences:Levinson, E.M. & Palmer, E.J., (2005).  Preparing Students with Disabilities for School-to-Work Transition and Postschool Life.  Retrieved on February 17, 2018.Morin, A. (n.d.).  10 Ways to Be an Effective Advocate for Your Child at School.  Retrieved on February 17, 2018.This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on March 09, 2018. Written by Rebecca Bardenhagen, M.Ed. and Lakshmi Mahadevan, Ph.D.As a service provider, you will have opportunities to strengthen the confidence of parents/guardians when advocating for their child with disabilities. When parents/guardians are effective advocates, they feel that they are an equal partner with professionals in formulating educational goals for their child. Following are five advocacy strategies that you as service providers can empower parents/guardians to employ:1. Share information and ask questionsParents/guardians should get to know those working with their child and keep an open line of communication.After establishing a relationship with school staff, parents/guardians can ask clarifying questions in a respectful and calm way (Morin, n.d.).The clarifying questions can serve to guide discussions towards specific areas of concern and ideas for solutions to those concerns.2. Maintain a record and organize all communicationsParents/guardians have the right to access all their child’s school-related information.Remind parents/guardians to keep an organized notebook of all report cards, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), assessments, medical records, and work samples.Additionally, maintaining a communication log will help parents/guardians keep track of who they spoke with, when, and a summary of the discussion. This notebook can be helpful in noticing progress as well as issues that need to be addressed (Morin, n.d.). 3. Become familiar with their rights and that of their childrenParents/guardians should know their child’s rights under the Individual’s with Disabilities Act (IDEA). To find out more specific information, parents/guardians can contact their state’s Parent Training and Information (PTI) Center.IDEA provides money for each state to have at least one PTI whose goal is to assist families with children birth to age 22 who have disabilities. The Center for Parent Information and Resources website has a listing of each state’s PTI.4. Learn important terms related to the needs of the childTo fully understand the kinds of assistance a child is receiving it may be necessary to ask for clarification of terms.The Center for Parent Information and Resources can aid parents/guardians in understanding key terms in special education.5. Talk to professionals about transition plansThe goal of an Individualized Education Program (IEP) is for students to be contributing members, to the best of their abilities, in work and community life.Parents/guardians can contribute to the transition process by encouraging their child to attend and lead their IEP meetings.Additionally, parents/guardians can advocate early (by age 14) for their child to receive a comprehensive career assessment and access to school-to-work transitionA comprehensive career assessment addresses the areas of academic skills, daily living skills, personal and social skills, occupational and vocational skills, career maturity, vocational interests, and vocational aptitudes. These assessments can help identify students’ aptitudes and abilities, allowing parents/guardians and schools to plan realistic future coursework (Levinson, E.M. & Palmer, E.J., 2005).last_img read more

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Long way to go for India to excel in sports

first_imgMumbai, Sep 21 (PTI) In spite of the sports sector in the country showing significant progress, India needs to traverse a long way before emerging as a serious player in the world of sports, it was stated here today during a Confederation of Indian Industry “Business of Sports” summit.”India has a long way to go before it emerges as a serious player in the world of sports. The country is facing a moment of truth after its performance at the 2016 Rio Olympics,” said Jaideep Ghosh, Partner and Head, Transport, Leisure and Sports, KPMG in India, at the function.Ghosh was referring to the countrys meagre medal haul of one silver and one bronze through shuttler P V Sindhu and wrestler Sakshi Malik in the quadrennial sports spectacle.”To initiate a strong foundation for the development of sports in India, the country needs to focus on three major aspects ? improving governance and infrastructure, building a sporting culture and deploying a focused approach to winning medals,” he said.”The countrys sports sector is going through a significant transition. In February 2016, the government accorded an industry status to sports infrastructure, which is expected to attract investments from the private sector, thereby not limiting its role to just Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities and non-profit organisations,” he added.According to a report compiled by KPMG and CII, corporate funding the Indian sports sector is experiencing a sea change with all-round developments initiated by the government, the private sector as well as non-profit organisations.Increasing viewership, sponsorship and participation in sports other than cricket, a rising number of sports start-ups and the growth in rural viewership numbers are key trends driving the growth of this sector in India.advertisementThe report further said that sports viewership on TV grew 30 per cent over the two year period between 2014 and 2015 and in 2015, the Indian sports sponsorship market grew 6.7 per cent to Rs 5,190 crore.”Sports consumption in India is on the rise with leagues as well international sports garnering strong support across multiple platforms. Out of the 11 operational leagues, nine were launched during 2013?16 and two more are planned in 2016,” the report said. PTI SSR NRB BS BS RYSlast_img read more

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10 months agoHakan Calhanoglu insists he’s happy with AC Milan

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Hakan Calhanoglu insists he’s happy with AC Milanby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveHakan Calhanoglu insists he’s happy at AC Milan.There’s been claims he will be sold next month.“I’m happy at Milan,” Calhanoglu told DAZN.“I’m happy with [Rino] Gattuso and his staff. I feel at home here in Milan.“The relationship [with Gattuso] is really good, even when he gets angry with me. I accept that, because he’s a good Coach with a winning mentality.“When it happens you’re better off not saying anything, otherwise you’ll get a clip round the ear…” last_img read more

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10 months agoBarcelona midfielder Rakitic: Valverde must decide his future

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Barcelona midfielder Rakitic: Valverde must decide his futureby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveBarcelona midfielder Ivan Rakitic says the players are happy playing for coach Ernesto Valverde.Valverde’s deal is up in the summer but he does have an option to extend it by an additional year. The coach says a decision will be made with the club later in the season.”It’s an issue for the boss and the club [to decide on],” Rakitic said. “We’re really happy with him and the whole coaching setup.”The most normal [scenario] would be that he continues with us, but we have to focus on our job, which is playing and winning football games. Let them [the club and Valverde] decide what’s for the best.” last_img read more

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Gov’t will Continue to Push Legislation in Parliament

first_imgThe Government will continue to pursue an active legislative agenda in the new fiscal year, with a number of bills to be passed.This was disclosed by Governor General, His Excellency the Most Hon. Sir Patrick Allen, as he delivered the Throne Speech at Gordon House on Thursday, April 4, where he announced that theGovernment passed 25 of the 33 Bills brought to Parliament during the just-ended legislative year.The Governor General argued that despite “a shortened legislative year,” this achievement “was an improvement on the previous year’s performance and higher than the average of the previous three years.”As part of the process to speed up the passage of Bills, the Office of the Parliamentary Counsel will be strengthened, in keeping with a review undertaken by the Cabinet Office.For this legislative year, the administration intends to pass a Public Sector Procurement Bill to provide the framework for a Public Sector Procurement System and legally separate the National Contracts Commission from the Office of the Contractor General, the Head of State informed.Also to be brought to Parliament are: amendments of the Road Traffic Act and Transport Authority Act, with the objective of ensuring that the gaps in the road traffic legislation affecting enforcement of road traffic laws are addressed; an Omnibus Tax Incentive Bill to establish a transparent and coherent regime to govern all tax incentives; and a Secured Transactions Bill to provide for a modern legislative framework for secured transactions with the objective of increasing access to finance especially for small and medium-sized enterprises.Other legislation include a Charities Bill to facilitate the proper supervision of entities carrying out charitable activities; a Bill to establish a Statutory Framework for the Court Management Service; and legislation to provide for Collective Investment Schemes.The Government, during the year, will also seek to pass: a Bill to establish a single anti-corruption agency; legislation to enable the court to grant specified discounts on years of imprisonment in the case of guilty pleas for certain offences, which now attract mandatory minimum sentence; and the Evidence (Amendment) Bill, to simplify certain procedural requirements to the admissibility of computer-generated evidence, and to facilitate the admission of uncontested expert reports and other agreed documents without having to call the expert or other maker of the document to give evidence at the trial.By Alecia Smith-Edwards, JIS Reporterlast_img read more

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How can criminals manipulate cryptocurrency markets

first_img Citation: How can criminals manipulate cryptocurrency markets? (2018, June 1) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-criminals-cryptocurrency.html Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are based on systems that are supposed to be inherently protected from fraud. Yet the U.S. Department of Justice has opened a criminal investigation into manipulation of bitcoin prices. How is that sort of activity even possible? Provided by The Conversation Now you see it, now you don’t. Credit: Syda Productions/Shutterstock.com Explore further There are fewer protections for cryptocurrency trading, in part because it’s so new. For instance, a high volatility in stock prices would trigger “circuit breakers” in the U.S., halting trading and resetting prices to limit investors’ losses. Cryptocurrency markets have no such built-in mechanisms. Exploiting anonymityAnother type of fraud the Justice Department is investigating is called “wash trading,” in which one person sets up what looks like a legitimate purchase-and-sale deal, but actually does the deal with himself or herself. That makes it look like there is more activity in the market than there actually is, artificially increasing demand and value.Anyone can have as many cryptocurrency accounts as they wish to set up. And many blockchain-based systems keep users’ identities anonymous. The transactions themselves – if they actually happen – are recorded and publicly viewable, but the accounts involved are only identified with bitcoin addresses, which are long alphanumeric codes like “1ExAmpLe0FaBiTco1NADr3sSV5tsGaMF6hd.”That anonymity can make it very hard to prove that wash trading is happening and challenges law enforcement to identify and catch fraudsters. At a June 2017 congressional hearing a former federal prosecutor told of cryptocurrency investigations revealing an account set up by a person claiming to be “Mickey Mouse” living at “123 Main Street.”Strengthening oversightSome countries are starting to regulate cryptocurrency markets, either under existing regulations or new ones. In 2015, for instance, a federal investigation found that the U.S. cryptocurrency company Ripple Labs had not properly followed anti-money laundering laws and rules about getting accurate customer identification information.In May 2018, 40 jurisdictions including U.S. states, Canadian provinces and national regulators in both countries launched a formal probe dubbed “Operation Cryptosweep,” to crack down on fraudulent cryptocurrency trading. They opened as many as 70 investigations and warned roughly 35 companies about potentially violating securities laws. The vast majority of cryptocurrency trading, however, happens in countries with few regulations and lax enforcement. For instance, from early 2014 to early 2017, about 90 percent of global bitcoin trading happened through Chinese cryptocurrency exchanges. At least some of those businesses allegedly falsely inflated trading volumes to attract new customers. China has since banned online cryptocurrency trading, but people are finding loopholes.The problems will likely shift to other countries that lack strong rules, which highlights the importance of international cooperation in investigations. Cryptocurrencies are a global phenomenon; the world’s nations – especially those with lots of trading activity – will have to work together to protect consumers.center_img Bitcoin crash could derail other cryptocurrencies From researching blockchain and cryptocurrencies for the past three years, I know that blockchain systems have some immutable security features. For instance, if I sent you some amount of bitcoin, and that transaction were recorded in the blockchain ledger, I couldn’t force the system to give that money back. The technology itself prevents the transaction from being reversed.But that is only true if transactions happen within the system. And there are other elements of cryptocurrency technologies that actually make fraud easier.Trading bitcoin like stocksSome of the problems the Justice Department is investigating appear to have arisen because bitcoin enthusiasts are not treating cryptocurrencies as a means of payment like dollars. Rather, they’re behaving as if bitcoins and their ilk are speculative assets like stocks and bonds. So they’re placing orders to buy bitcoin in advance, only later completing the deal. One type of fraud investigators are looking into is called “spoofing,” in which people place orders but cancel them before the deal is finalized – often without even having to pay a service fee. That makes it look like there’s more demand for bitcoin than there actually is, driving up the value of each bitcoin.That sort of manipulation is possible with almost any type of asset. Bitcoin is more susceptible than stocks or bonds because so few people hold large amounts of bitcoin. The largest 1,000 bitcoin accounts hold 40 percent of all the bitcoins in existence – with almost 20 percent held in just 100 accounts.Many of the people who own large amounts of bitcoin have been in the cryptocurrency community for a number of years and know each other. They can take coordinated actions to increase or decrease prices – and because there’s no real regulation of cryptocurrency markets, it might not even be illegal for them to do so. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

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