ABC suspends Firewater Saloons alcohol license in Oceanside

first_imgFacebookTwitter Categories: Local San Diego News KUSI Newsroom, Posted: September 25, 2018 KUSI Newsroom center_img September 25, 2018 OCEANSIDE (KUSI) – Agents of the California Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) have posted a Notice of Suspension at the Firewater Saloon located at 406 Pier View Way in the city of Oceanside.  The business is prohibited from serving, selling or allowing consumption of alcohol indefinitely. The owner must transfer the license to another person or persons within the next 180 days or the license will be revoked.The suspension is the result of an investigation conducted by the ABC and Oceanside Police Department related to disorderly activity as defined by California Business and Professions Code Section 25601.From December 2016 through July 2018, police responded and took action numerous times for incidents such as fights, assaults, public drunkenness and disturbing the peace. Because there were so many calls for service this created a law enforcement problem and a drain on police resources.ABC protects communities through education and by administering prevention and enforcement programs designed to increase compliance with California’s alcoholic beverage laws. ABC licensees and their employees are encouraged to take ABC’s LEAD training online or in a classroom setting to help achieve higher compliance with alcoholic beverage laws. LEAD stands for Licensee Education on Alcohol and Drugs.To learn more about ABC programs that help protect communities, prevent alcohol-related harm and potentially save lives visit https://www.abc.ca.gov/programs/programs_PE.html. ABC suspends Firewater Saloon’s alcohol license in Oceansidelast_img read more

Read More

Bridging the New and Old Workflow

first_imgMark Logic’s second new service, Toolkit for Word, allows organizations to include any content application they build on Mark Logic into Microsoft Word. “What that means is they do all the granular level creation,” said Kreisa. “For example, they might be authoring content using Word and they might want to take advantage of other content they’ve created. They can grab the content application plug-in, search across all their content, and grab components that they want. This dynamically assembles new content with the repository behind the scenes.” The service also creates intelligent authoring. “Most people are cutting and pasting—they open two different documents and try to do that assembly themselves,” Kreisa said. “Now organizations can build content applications they want for that dynamic assembly. They can tag things in the content and apply custom metadata that can be loaded into the Microsoft Office document inside the XML documents.”Toolkit for Word is distributed as open source under an Apache 2.0 license. In theory, the digital workflow makes things easier. Often, though, publishers have to go through multiple steps to get content (which is typically created in Microsoft Word) into the digital workflow or to get different applications working together. XML server provider Mark Logic has introduced two services designed to streamline the digital workflow. The first is MarkLogic Connector for SharePoint, which automatically mirrors content from Microsoft Office SharePoint 2007 to MarkLogic’s server. Once in MarkLogic, users can create XML-based applications that make it easier to find and repurpose individual content components. Users can also set up a folder in SharePoint and anything dropped into that folder will automatically be pushed to the Mark Logic server and converted into XML. Then it’s available to any content application built on top of Mark Logic, including dynamic delivery and syndication. “There might be multiple authors saving work into it directly and anything that gets pushed in there automatically gets indexed and processed by Mark Logic,” John Kreisa, director of industry solutions for Mark Logic, told FOLIO:. “We see this as important in tough economic times. Publishers are looking to save money and want to get away from some of the bloated and expensive enterprise content management systems.”last_img read more

Read More

Fresh Off an Acquisition Modern Luxury Looks to Build Out Its Empire

first_img Folio: A major trend, at least that we’ve observed among titles that are heavily dependent on luxury advertising, is a pullback on print spending in that space. Is that one-stop-shop offering something that you feel will help Modern Luxury’s titles stay immune to that trend? Folio: That natural consolidation, is that something you’re seeing on the advertising side? Dickey: Well, it’s a couple of things. [GreenGale] was in markets that we weren’t in, so for us to finish our buildout, it was easy to add four markets where we had no presence — Austin, Boston, Philly, and Vegas — and then where we overlapped in the remaining markets, including in two very large ones served by iconic [GreenGale] brands, [Miami’s] Ocean Drive and Hamptons, it made perfect sense to grab those marquee brands and bring them into the fold as well. Folio: Are you selling that to advertisers as something other national publishers can’t offer — that combination of local presence and national scale across all of these luxury markets? Dickey: The titles themselves have coexisted for anywhere from a year to 10 years, depending on the market. Obviously, the market supported both of them for that period of time. So we’ll maintain separate sales staffs, separate publishers, separate editorial. We’ll share back-end offices, but we’re mainly focused on where we are distributing to get better coverage for advertisers so we don’t have duplication on our distribution, which will encourage advertisers to buy both titles. Step three is to increase frequency back up to what we feel is a good rate, and that’s between eight and 10 times per year. Currently, all Modern Luxury city books publish 10 times per year, and all but two of the former GreenGale titles publish six times. So we’d like to get them up to eight or 10 over the next year or two. On top of that, we’d like to build out our portfolio of publications in each market, which would include interiors, weddings, men’s books, and visitors. Folio: So there will be more of a shift in distribution or marketing than in coverage? We’re not necessarily interested in going into the top 40 markets or anything else. Based upon where the luxury environment is, as retail space constricts, there will be more and more focus placed on those top 25 luxury markets [including Palm Beach]. We feel that we’re perfectly placed to serve advertisers’ needs in those places. We’re very bullish on print. Thirty-five percent of all luxury brands’ ad spend is on print, which is quite a bit higher than any other retail sector. Folio: Those were four markets you were looking to expand into, and this was the ideal way to do so? Dickey: Distribution will be first and foremost. For marketing and events, we’ll be able to use resources from both titles. Dickey: First of all, we want to integrate and get the companies into one culture. That’s our top priority. As we do that, when it comes to the tiles we’ve acquired, we want to expand the editorial teams, expand the sales staffs, put them more in line with how Modern Luxury staffs its publications. So culture is step one, and step two is to increase the staff size in sales, editorial, and maybe some marketing. Dickey: We divide our company into three segments: marketing, editorial, and sales. Each have their own different culture and different needs and wants. From the sales side, we’re very focused on teaching, training, and accountability. In terms of editorial, we are fully focused on creating the best, most relevant content in each of these cities — not focused on press releases, but on a local editor crafting and creating a story that is of interest to our readers. Marketing ties directly into sales, focused on creating the best events that we can do brand activation, and also which provide an experience for our readers that they can’t get anywhere else. Folio: Looking forward, you just expanded into Silicon Valley and you’ve got Palm Beach launch coming up this fall. What kind of impact has this acquisition had on Modern Luxury’s plans going forward? Our sites are not open to programmatic buying. We don’t get involved with that. Everything on our sties is sold by us, every advertisement in the magazine is sold buy us. When our clients advertise in Modern Luxury, they know that ad is going to be in a safe place. Folio: You mentioned that a major priority is integrating these new brands into one culture. What is that Modern Luxury culture, in your mind? Folio: Two of those resort markets you mentioned, Aspen and The Hamptons, will now be served by multiple, formerly-competing titles under the same portfolio. How will you go about deciding how to shift the focus of those titles or differentiate them? The deal may be seen as a logical consolidation of media brands that serve a luxury retail market going through its own slowdown, but it comes with an interesting twist: Modern Luxury says it has no plans to shutter or even downsize any of the GreenGale titles it purchased, including those which formerly competed head-to-head with their new portfolio-mates.  Dickey: Yes, we do a wonderful job on that in quite a few of our markets, especially in Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles. All of those markets have the full or almost-full complement of our titles. Again, we want to become a one-stop shop for those luxury brands. The regional magazine space experienced a major shakeup last week when its largest luxury lifestlye publisher, Modern Luxury, acquired its second-largest, GreenGale Publishing, for an undisclosed sum.  Folio: What about when it comes to something like marketing services or custom content? Michael Dickey: There have been conversations going on between the two companies for the past four or five years. Consolidation was something that naturally had to happen in the market, and it made sense for the two companies to come together. We’d like to add those things a title at a time, interiors and weddings first and foremost. Then we’ll start to look at expanding into another market. The only other real luxury market that we see — where luxury brands are interested in having us go – would be Seattle/Portland, but that’s a little ways away. Dickey: Yes, it was quicker to jump into those markets with pre-existing brands, so it made the most sense. Michael Dickey Folio: Modern Luxury and Niche Media/GreenGale have been competitors for some time. Was a merger something that had been discussed in the past? Folio: sat down with Modern Luxury CEO Michael Dickey to learn a little bit more about his company’s plans for the newly acquired portfolio — which includes titles like Hamptons, Michigan Avenue, and Ocean Drive, among 13 others — and where the luxury lifestlye publishing space is headed. We’re the complete one-stop shop for all luxury brands as they go into these markets on a national basis, and then on a local basis we connect business owners with other business owners in a way that national brands can’t, and [at a price] that most of these local businesses can afford. Dickey: Where it makes sense, and based upon lease schedules and everything else, we’d love to house everyone together. In Miami, they’ll remain separate for quite some time. In New York, we’ll maintain the separate offices, but the local staffs will be together, while the national staffs will be in a separate location. In Los Angeles, we will consolidate into one office. In Chicago, where we have a very large office, we’ll consolidate. We’ll have some savings and some synergies based upon office space, for sure. Folio: So a big part of this is being able to offer integrated sales across multiple regional markets? Dickey: We offer something no one else can offer. We are local experts in each of these markets. We have full staffs, we live there, we breathe there, we eat there, we socialize there. Outside of New York, the national brands don’t have that. We can offer unparalleled brand activation, we can tell them where the hotspots are in each city, where they should rent retail space, what events they should be associated with.  Dickey: Luxury by itself, by definition, is something that is in little supply and high demand. It’s expensive. There’s been such a homogenization in the retail space. You go into any city, and it’s the same stores and the same merchandise. Most retailers realize that they have to have different product offerings in different cities across the board. By doing that, you create scarcity, which creates demand. That’s just what’s going to have to happen. Folio: That’s a model that’s worked well for you in your more established markets, the four specialized publications branching off of that main city book? Folio: Logistically, what happens to the titles that were purchased from GreenGale? Folio: From an organizational perspective, is there a need for those three departments to cooperate more than in the past? Dickey: Absolutely. We focus on the top 24 luxury markets, which includes the major cities as well as smaller resort markets like Aspen, Scottsdale, the Hamptons, where the billionaires live and play. We’re able to offer our entire portfolio on a strategic level, and then tactically, if there’s a store opening or sales are down in a single market, we can activate in that market. So they get the best of both worlds. So it was the perfect time to make an acquisition with very little waste, and we think it’s going to benefit us by providing a much stronger presence in the markets where we overlap, as well as bringing those additional markets into the fold. We’ll be better able to serve our customers and our clients. Dickey: We have a custom content division, and we create custom content for advertisers in the form of magazines or brochures. We haven’t focused on creating content in terms of content that we’ll run on our websites. We are a strong believer that we are a trusted source for our readers. We don’t want to try and purposely confuse them with content. If we do run an advertorial in print, it’s completely stated up front, separated, and designed differently from our typical editorial. We don’t run it on the digital side because it’s too confusing to our readers. Once we lose the trust of our reader, we’ve got nothing. Dickey: Sales and marketing have always worked closely. In terms of editorial, we’ve always had them separate from sales. There’s always communication, but there is no pay-for-play with what we do.last_img read more

Read More

Hurricane Maria killed 4600 in Puerto Rico 70 times official toll study

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 28 September 2017, a flag of Puerto Rico flies over the damaged house of Javier in Yabucoa, in the east of Puerto Rico, after the passage of Hurricane Maria. Hurricane Maria, which pummeled Puerto Rico in September 2017, is likely responsible for the deaths of more than 4,600 people, some 70 times higher than official estimates, researchers at Harvard University said on 29 May 2018.Hurricane Maria, which pummelled Puerto Rico in September 2017, is likely responsible for the deaths of more than 4,600 people, some 70 times higher than official estimates, US researchers said Tuesday.The government-provided death toll stands at just 64, but experts say an accurate count was complicated by the power outages and widespread devastation wreaked by the storm, which caused $90 billion in damages and is ranked as the third costliest cyclone in the United States since 1900.Earlier independent investigations have put the true toll at closer to 1,000.But the latest estimates, compiled by researchers at Harvard University, came back far higher — at 4,645 deaths from the day of the storm, 20 September, until 31 December 2017.For comparison, the death toll from 2005’s Hurricane Katrina — the costliest hurricane in US history — was far lower, and estimated at 1,833.Most deaths after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico are blamed on interruptions in medical care due to power outages and blocked or washed out roads, said the report published in the New England Journal of Medicine.”Approximately one-third of post-hurricane deaths were reported by household members as being caused by delayed or prevented access to medical care,” said the report.- Methodology -Researchers went door-to-door at 3,299 homes randomly selected from across the US territory, home to some 3.3 million people.Survey-takers used criteria from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention to determine if a person’s death could be blamed on the hurricane.By definition, this could be either forces related to the event such as flying debris, or unsafe or unhealthy conditions in the three months afterward including loss of necessary medical services.The surveys were taken from January to February 2018, a time when, researchers noted, “many survey respondents were still without water and electricity.”To avoid bias, people were not paid for their responses, and were informed that their answers would not gain them any additional government aid.If a family member was reported missing but not known to be deceased, researchers counted them as alive.The data showed a 62 per cent increase in the mortality rate in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, compared to the same period a year earlier, corresponding to a total of 4,645 deaths. Even this is believed to be a “substantial underestimate” of the actual death count, said the report, noting it could be above 5,700.”Our estimates are roughly consistent with press reports that evaluated deaths in the first month after the hurricane,” it added.”On average, households went 84 days without electricity, 64 days without water, and 41 days without cellular telephone coverage.”Researchers said they were unable to compare their estimates with the latest government count, because their request for access to those figures was denied.The government of Puerto Rico stopped publicly sharing its data on hurricane deaths in December 2017.”These numbers will serve as an important independent comparison to official statistics from death registry data, which are currently being re-evaluated, and underscore the inattention of the US government to the frail infrastructure of Puerto Rico,” concluded the report.last_img read more

Read More

Docker Store and Docker Cloud are now part of Docker Hub

first_imgYesterday, the team at Docker announced that Docker Store and Docker Cloud are now part of Docker Hub. This makes the process of finding, storing and sharing container images easy. The new Docker Hub has an updated user experience where Docker certified and verified publisher images are available for discovery and download. Docker Cloud, a service provided by Docker helps users to connect the Docker Cloud to their existing cloud providers like Azure or AWS. Docker store is used for creating a self-service portal for Docker’s ecosystem partners for publishing and distributing their software through Docker images. What’s new in this Docker Hub update? Repositories                                          Source: Docker Users can now view recently pushed tags and automated builds on their repository page. Pagination has now been added to the repository tags. The repository filtering on the Docker Hub homepage has been improved. Organizations and Teams Organization owners can now view the team permissions across all of their repositories at one glance. Existing Docker Hub users can now be added to a team via their email IDs instead of their Docker IDs. Automated Builds Source: Docker Build Caching is now used to speed up builds. It is now possible to add environment variables and run tests in the builds. Automated builds can now be added to existing repositories. Account credentials for organizations like GitHub and BitBucket need to re-linked to the organization for leveraging the new automated builds. Improved container image search Filter by Official, Verified Publisher, and Certified images guarantees a level of quality in the Docker images. Docker Hub provides filter by categories for quick search of images. There is no need of updating any bookmarks on Docker Hub. Verified publisher and certified images The Docker certified and verified publisher images are now available for discovery and download on Docker Hub. Just like official Images, even publisher images have been vetted by Docker. The certified and verified publisher images are provided by the third-party software vendors. Certified images are tested and supported by verified publishers on Docker Enterprise platform. Certified images adhere to Docker’s container best practices. The certified images pass a functional API test suite and also display a unique quality mark “Docker Certified”. Read more about this release on Docker’s blog post. Read Next Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB): Docker, Microsoft partner on an open source cloud-agnostic all-in-one packaging format Docker announces Docker Desktop Enterprise Creating a Continuous Integration commit pipeline using Docker [Tutorial]last_img read more

Read More