2009 Be Active Super League

first_imgTompkins Claim First Men’s Open CrownThe Tompkins Park Sharks have claimed their first ever Men’s Open trophy, claiming the 2009 Be Active Super League crown with a dominant 9 – 5 victory over Perth Brothers in Perth tonight (Sun 8th Nov).Hosting the finals series, Tompkins Park flew out of the blocks to take a 3 – 0 lead in just the first three minutes, and although Brothers never lost touch with the Sharks, the home side always looked in control of the match, after taking a 7 – 2 lead into half time.In the Women’s Open division, Northern Districts made it back to back Super League victories, defeating Perth Brothers 5 – 3 in the final.Surprisingly to some, Shelley Matcham donned heavy protection to her knee and contributed to the win, while fellow Australian representative Zoe Aiken-Dacey took control in the middle of the ground.Earlier in the day, the Fremantle Rebels took the Mixed Open title over Bunbury.  Both teams were locked at 4-all at half time, and although Bunbury’s Jeremy Te Uira crossed for four touchdowns in the match, it wasn’t enough to stop Freo from running over the top of the south west team to win 9 – 6.The focus of teams now shifts to the Be Active State Championships, appearing in November for the first time.  The State Championships will feature 42 teams and players from around Western Australia from 20th – 22nd November at McGillivray Oval.2009 Be Active Super League – Scores & AwardsMen’s OpenTompkins Park Sharks (9) def Perth Brothers (5).Keith Harris-Walker Medal – Jessie Murphy (Tompkins Park)Finals Referees   Karen Woods                                Brendon Antrobus                                Tony ArnelWomen’s OpenNorthern Districts Spirit (5) def Perth Brothers (3)Karamea Dorset Medal – Michelle Gilpin (Northern Districts)Finals Referees   Phil Galvin                                Justin Parsons                                James McMahonMixed OpenFremantle Rebels (9) def Bunbury (6)Finals Referees   Richard McIlroy                                John Bedford                                John CorserRelated Filesmedia_release_081109-doclast_img read more

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Vision impairments may increase risk of falls in older adults

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 19 2018Vision impairment and blindness affect one in 11 Americans age 65 and older. Because our population is aging, the number of older adults with vision problems is predicted to rise. Older adults who have impaired vision may be at risk for decreased independence, poorer well-being, and an increased risk of falls. For example, in any given year, approximately 30 percent of adults over age 65 will fall. Having impaired vision more than doubles this risk.For older adults, falls are a major cause of illness and death. Even having a fear of falling is a challenge that can limit activity and worsen quality of life and independence as you age.However, we don’t have much information on how often visually impaired older adults experience a fall, and we have even less information about what happens to them after a fall. A team of researchers suggested that we need this information in order to understand the scope of the problem and create ways to prevent falls in visually impaired older adults.To learn more, the research team examined information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS). They published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.Their goal was to provide up-to-date information on the frequency of falls. The team also wanted to learn more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments.Participants in the study were considered visually impaired if they had trouble recognizing someone across the street and/or reading newspaper print, even when using corrective lenses.Falls were defined as “any fall, slip, or trip” that involved losing balance and landing on the floor or ground or at a lower level. Participants were asked if they had any fall in the past month and if they fell more than once in the past 12 months. Fear of falling was determined by asking participants if they had worried about falling down in the last month. An additional question asked whether worrying about falling ever caused participants to limit their activities.Related StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsThe researchers also asked about the number of chronic conditions the participants had, including heart attack, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes, lung disease, stroke, and cancer.The researchers concluded that falls, fear of falling, and limiting activity were considerably more common among older adults who were visually impaired.About 50 percent of people who said they had trouble seeing were afraid of falling and as a result, limited their activity. More than one in four older adults with vision problems had recurrent falls in the year before they were surveyed.The researchers said their study suggested that taking steps to prevent falls for older adults with vision problems was important and could limit the harmful consequences of falls for older adults. What’s more, helping older adults prevent falls might also slow declines in well-being, quality of life, and independence associated with a fear of falling.The researchers noted that vision impairment can be treated or even avoided in many cases, and they speculated that doing so might be a strategy to decrease falls and fall-related problems for some older adults with vision problems.”We need more information about falls and the fear of falling in older adults with vision problems. This will help us design public health and clinical interventions to address some of the key consequences of vision loss for older adults,” said study co-author Joshua R. Ehrlich, MD, MPH. Source:http://www.healthinaging.org/blog/having-poor-vision-can-raise-risk-for-falls-among-older-adults/last_img read more

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Oldest US nuke plant near Jersey shore closing Sept 17

first_img Officials with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission held a briefing Monday on shutdown plans for Oyster Creek, which opened in 1969. They said Chicago-based Exelon plans to remove the remaining nuclear fuel rods from storage pools and put them into dry storage within 5½ years of the shutdown date.All told, it will cost $1.4 billion to shut down the plant; Exelon currently has $982.1 million of that set aside in a decommissioning account, NRC officials said.Although the plant will stop producing electricity just before summer ends, radioactive material could be on site until the late 2070s, if not later.”There is no national repository for spent fuel at this point,” said Neil Sheehan, a spokesman for the commission. “The only option for operators is to store the spent nuclear fuel on site.”The NRC is considering applications to erect a national nuclear waste depository either in Texas or New Mexico, but has not decided on either, Sheehan said.Ray Powell, an NRC decommissioning official, said Exelon already has moved nuclear fuel roads into 34 dry storage units called casks, steel containers encased in concrete that are designed to safely store the material while its radioactivity decreases over time. Another 40 casks will be filled with the remaining nuclear fuel roads once the plant shuts down, he said.Those casks will be guarded around the clock, and are designed to withstand natural disasters including floods and earthquakes.Oyster Creek went online Dec. 1, 1969, the same day as the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Generating Station near Oswego, New York. But Oyster Creek’s original license was granted first, technically making it the oldest of the nation’s commercial nuclear reactors that are still operating.The NRC said Chicago-based Exelon, which owns Oyster Creek, will put it into so-called “safe store” condition until 2075 as radiation levels dissipate. Dismantling of the plant itself should take place between 2075 and 2078, they added.But Suzanne D’Ambrosio, a spokeswoman for Exelon, said “the timeline could be much shorter.””The used fuel will be stored on site in robust metal canisters housed in a massive concrete housing,” she said. “The storage facility is highly secured and the casks are impervious to weather and risk of attack. The canisters emit very low, if any, measurable levels of radiation and they present no danger to the public.”The plant reached a deal with New Jersey regulators to shut down earlier than permitted in return for not having to build at least one costly cooling tower.As part of changes to the plant’s emergency response system, a 10-mile emergency zone surrounding the plant, where specific evacuation and response events would happen in the event of an emergency, may be eliminated once the fuel cools to the point where a melting accident is considered unlikely, NRC officials said.A public hearing on Exelon’s decommissioning plans is scheduled for July 17 in Lacey Township. America’s oldest nuclear power plant will shut down on Sept. 17, but the Oyster Creek plant near the New Jersey shore will stay right where it is for the next 60 years. Citation: Oldest US nuke plant, near Jersey shore, closing Sept. 17 (2018, July 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-oldest-nuke-jersey-shutter-september.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Hurricane forces three US reactors shut © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Delhi Arvind Kejriwal announces free safety kits for sanitation workers

first_imgDelhi: Arvind Kejriwal announces free safety kits for sanitation workersSpeaking at a workshop organised by the Delhi Jal Board at Talkatora Stadium, he said it feels dejected to hear about the deaths of sanitation workers.advertisement Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 15, 2019UPDATED: July 15, 2019 15:15 IST File photo: PTIDelhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal on Monday said his government will give free safety kits to sanitation workers in the national capital.Speaking at a workshop organised by the Delhi Jal Board at Talkatora Stadium, he said it feels dejected to hear about the deaths of sanitation workers.”We are concerned about the lives of sanitation workers and will give free safety kits to those working in Delhi so that no mishaps happen,” Arvind Kejriwal said.Around 4,000 workers joined the workshop.”We have organised a one-day workshop to enhance the skills of sanitation workers and make them aware about the use of safety kits. There are around 12,000 sanitation workers with DJB and around 4,000 joined the workshop,” said Vice Chairman of DJB Dinesh Mohaniya.”Earlier, there were only 50 per cent sewer lines in Delhi and in our tenure, it has gone up to 80 per cent,” the chief minister claimed.Arvind Kejriwal also spoke about the work done by his government on potable water supply in the city.”In the last 70 years, only 58 per cent colonies in Delhi had the facility of potable water supply lines but we have increased it to 93 per cent and in the next one year, every colony would have it,” Arvind Kejriwal said.ALSO READ | Arvind Kejriwal and Delhi Police spar over increased crime rate in capital, Atishi blames BJPALSO READ | AAP Report Card: Out of 1,000 Mohalla Clinics promised, only 191 deliveredALSO WATCH | Watch: Arvind Kejriwal slapped during a roadshow in DelhiFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byNayanika Sengupta Tags :Follow Arvind KejriwalFollow sanitation workersFollow Delhi Sanitation workersFollow Delhi water supply Nextlast_img read more

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