VANCOUVER SCREEN SCENE ICE NO TOMORROW DATE MY DAD AND MORE

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment ‘Twas the week before Christmas and all through the city, not a production was stirring, not even a miniseries.Well, not quite. But a number of productions are taking a break for the holiday season and several are wrapping up.That said, the new year will bring a number of new productions to the city, and we’ve already got one on our radar. Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook One of the new TV productions kicking off in 2017 will be Date My Dad.This family dramedy starts shooting on January 17 and continues until April 12.The series follows Ricky Parker, whose beloved wife died three years ago. Since that time, Ricky’s sole agenda has been to devote himself to his three daughters, aged 10, 13, and 15 years old.Although his mother-in-law has been helping him raise the girls, she has decided to move away.However, the girls have some plans of their own as they try to find a girlfriend for their father as he turns 40 years old.But it’ll be a crash course, as he hasn’t dated for two decades. Luckily for him, his girls will be there to give him advice—which, considering their tender ages and inexperience themselves, may not be the best thing.The cast is yet to be announced.Meanwhile, another production in which teens lead the way—though through some much darker territory—finished up its shoot.The Canadian horror-comedy feature film Dead Shack, directed by Vancouver filmmaker Peter Ricq, wrapped up on December 17.last_img read more

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WHATS SHOOTING IN ONTARIO – AS OF FEB0918 – LINKS BY DGC

first_img Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment WHAT’S SHOOTING IN ONTARIO – AS OF FEB-09-18DGC (Director’s Guild of Canada) Hotlist – CLICK HERE (44 page PDF)OMDC (Ontario Media Development Corporation) MEDIA LIST – CLICK HERE (2-page PDF) Advertisement Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Advertisement ACTRA – CLICK HEREIATSE 873 – CLICK HERE.LOOKING FOR A JOB?  CHECK OUT OUR CASTING, JOB & CREW NOTICESCASTING A PRODUCTION? HIRING CREW? POST YOUR NOTICE HERETO VIEW OR POST CASTING NOTICES: CLICK HERETO VIEW OR POST CREW & JOB NOTICES: CLICK HERE.ARE YOU A FREELANCER?  CREW?  DO YOU WORK BEHIND THE SCENES?ARE YOU A PRODUCTION COMPANY?DO YOU PROVIDE A SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY?ADD YOUR COMPANY (OR YOUR SERVICES) TO THE PRODUCTION DIRECTORYRegister & List your company in the FREE eBOSS PRODUCTION DIRECTORYCLICK HERE.DEALS AND DISCOUNTSCheck out our deals page for discounts on events, restaurants, industry services, health and fitness, auto services and much more – CLICK HERE.FOLLOW eBOSS CANADA ON SOCIAL MEDIA  The Entertainment Business One-Stop ShopFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/eboss.canada/Twitter: https://twitter.com/eBOSSCanadaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/eBOSSCanada/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ebosscanadaDOWNLOAD THE eBOSS CANADA APPFor up-to-date News, Job Notices, Casting Notices, Events, and much morelast_img read more

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1 in 4 anglophone Canadians have cut the TV cord over half

first_img Facebook “I think part of that is at some point all the people who want to have Netflix will have subscribed, so growth will continue to slow,” Sharkey says. “But certainly it’s still the most important (streaming service).” Advertisement Of the poll respondents who did have a subscription to at least one streaming service, only 16 per cent said they were likely or somewhat likely to sign up for another in the year ahead. In fact, the report suggested there was little appetite for consumers to subscribe to Netflix’s competitors.The logo of American entertainment company Netflix is pictured at the Paris games week in Paris, Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017. One in four anglophone Canadians have cut the cord and no longer pay for a traditional TV service, while just over half are Netflix users, according to a report by the Media Technology Monitor.THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Christophe Ena Advertisement The report also focuses on a category of digitally savvy users dubbed TV My Way viewers — representing 14 per cent of the Canadians polled — who now watch all their TV and film content through the internet. An additional seven per cent of the respondents watch streaming content along with TV via over-the-air signals, while six per cent said they essentially watch no TV at all. One in four anglophone Canadians have cut the cord and no longer pay for a traditional TV service, while just over half are Netflix users, a report by the Media Technology Monitor suggests.Based on telephone surveys with 4,156 Canadians conducted by Forum Research Inc. between Sept. 27, 2017 and Dec. 8, 2017, 73 per cent of respondents said they had a TV subscription, which was down from the 78 per cent who said the same in 2016.“We’ve seen a steady decrease in paid TV subscriptions,” says Jenny Meadows, head of client services for MTM. “That’s changing the (media) environment we live in.”Digital only viewers on the rise But Netflix subscriber growth in Canada is now at the stage where it’s slowing, adds Andrea Sharkey, senior manager of market insights for MTM. They were also far more likely to have a Netflix subscription, with nearly eight in 10 saying they used the streaming service versus 54 per cent of all the survey respondents. Advertisement TV My Way viewers tended to be younger, most commonly in the 18 to 34 age group, and were more likely to be social media users, listen to music and podcasts online, and use their mobile devices to stream video.center_img “They were first to market, they do what they do very well.” Many of the 18-34-year-old viewers prefer an internet-based service. (Shutterstock) LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment “Only about half of those watched it in a typical month,” Sharkey says. “A lot of the people who have a subscription to the Prime Video service only have it because it’s bundled with their online shopping.” MTM says the survey results are considered accurate within 1.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20. “It is by far the most popular service over time and it continues to grow,” says Meadows of Netflix’s foothold in Canada. Login/Register With: Only eight per cent of those polled said they were users of CraveTV and six per cent said they had Amazon Prime Video. Of the Amazon Prime Video users, many had a login but said they didn’t really use it. “Typically most people only have one and when they do have multiples they’re stacking it with Netflix,” says Sharkey. Twitterlast_img read more

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Jerry OConnell is American but he takes pride in his new Canadian

first_img Twitter Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: O’Connell also calls Carter “sort of the procedural Schitt’s Creek,” referencing the CBC comedy. “If there was a murder a week on Schitt’s Creek it would be Carter.” So how does Jerry O’Connell stack up as an American actor playing a Canadian in a TV series that’s set in Ontario?Try this for Great White North bona fides: he suggests a crossover episode between his new show, Carter, which debuts May 15 at 8 p.m. on Bravo, and CraveTV hoser hit Letterkenny, which he calls one of the best shows on TV.It could be “the hockey players finding a body,” O’Connell says. “Coach is gonna be a suspect, he’s gonna freak out when he’s getting interrogated in the box,” he adds, referring to Mark Forward’s notoriously hot-tempered Letterkenny character.center_img Advertisement From left, Kristian Bruun, Jerry O’Connell, Sydney Tamiia Poitier and Brenda Kamino in Carter. (BROOKE PALMER / BELL MEDIA) Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

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DISNEY SEALS 71B DEAL FOR FOX ENTERTAINMENT TAKES OVER THE SIMPSONS AND

first_img Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Disney needs compelling TV shows and movies to persuade viewers to sign up and pay for yet another streaming service. It already has classic Disney cartoons, Star Wars, Pixar, the Muppets and some of the Marvel characters. With Fox, Disney could add Marvel’s X-Men and Deadpool, along with programs shown on such Fox channels as FX Networks and National Geographic. Fox’s productions also include The Americans, This Is Us and Modern Family.The deal helps Disney further control TV shows and movies from start to finish — from creating the programs to distributing them through television channels, movie theatres, streaming services and other ways people watch entertainment. Disney would get valuable data on customers and their entertainment-viewing habits, which it can then use to sell advertising.Disney CEO Bob Iger said in an earnings call in February that Disney Plus and other direct-to-consumer businesses are Disney’s “No. 1 priority.”Cable and telecom companies have been buying the companies that make TV shows and movies to compete in a changing media landscape. Although internet providers like AT&T and Comcast directly control their customers’ access to the internet in a way that Amazon, YouTube and Netflix do not, they still face threats as those streaming services gain in popularity.AT&T bought Time Warner last year for $81 billion and has already launched its own streaming service, Watch TV, with Time Warner channels such as TBS and TNT, among other networks, for $15 a month.In addition to boosting the Disney streaming service, expected to debut next year, the deal paves the way for Marvel’s X-Men and the Avengers to reunite in future movies. Though Disney owns Marvel Studios, some characters including the X-Men had already been licensed to Fox.Disney also gets a controlling stake in the existing streaming service Hulu, which it plans to keep operating as a home for more general programming. Family-friendly shows and movies will head to Disney Plus.No pricing has been disclosed for Disney Plus. The streaming service will feature five categories of material: Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars and National Geographic. Disney charges $5 a month for ESPN Plus, a service that offers programming distinct from the ESPN cable channel.Meanwhile, Fox Corp. — the parts of 21st Century Fox that are not part of the deal, including Fox News, Fox Sports and Fox Broadcasting — started trading on the Nasdaq under the “FOX” and “FOXA” tickers on Tuesday.© 2019 The Canadian Press Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox’s entertainment business, putting Cinderella, The Simpsons, Star Wars and Dr. Strange under one corporate roof.The deal is likely to shake up the media landscape. Among other things, it paves the way for Disney to launch its streaming service, Disney Plus, due out later this year. It will also likely lead to layoffs in the thousands, thanks to duplication in Fox and Disney film-production staff.By buying the studios behind The Simpsons and X-Men, Disney aims to better compete with technology companies such as Amazon and Netflix for viewers’ attention — and dollars. Twitterlast_img read more

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MARGUERITE PIGOTT ANNOUNCED AS THE CITY OF TORONTOS NEW FILM COMMISSIONER AND

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: Prior to joining the CMPA, Pigott held a number of senior industry positions including with SuperChannel and Odeon Films (an Alliance Atlantis company). Since 2009, Pigott has been on the Board of Ontario Creates, formerly the Ontario Media Development Corporation, and is currently the acting chair of that board.Toronto’s screen industry brings nearly $2 billion in production investment to the city and employs more than 30,000 people. Find out more at toronto.ca/film or follow xoTO on social media at twitter.com/xoTO, at facebook.com/xoTO.ca and at instagram.com/xoTO_.Quotes“I want to congratulate Ms. Pigott on this important appointment. As a well-established and well-regarded executive in the Canadian film industry, her vast network of contacts and acute business acumen will serve her and us very well in this key leadership position. I know that, under Marguerite’s leadership, Toronto will diversify and expand upon the ongoing success of our screen-based media industries.”– Mayor John Tory“Ms. Pigott’s extensive creative and business experience in broadcast, distribution and production gives her a unique perspective and highly informed understanding of Canada’s creative industries. Her deep commitment to the growth and vibrancy of these industries are a vital advantage to Toronto as we continue to expand our creative sector.”– Deputy Mayor Michael Thompson (Councillor for Ward 21 Scarborough Centre), Chair of the City’s Economic and Community Development CommitteeIt’s a huge privilege to take on this role. These industries contribute enormously to the economic and cultural vibrancy of Toronto, so I’m very excited to join the team that brings the world to Toronto and Toronto to the world.”– Marguerite PigottToronto is Canada’s largest city, the fourth largest in North America, and home to a diverse population of more than 2.9 million people. It is a global centre for business, finance, arts and culture and is consistently ranked one of the world’s most livable cities. For information on non-emergency City services and programs, Toronto residents, businesses and visitors can visit toronto.ca, call 311, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, or follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/cityoftoronto, on Instagram at instagram.com/cityofto or on Facebook at facebook.com/cityofto. Facebook Advertisement Marguerite Pigottcenter_img Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The City of Toronto has appointed Marguerite Pigott as Toronto’s new Film Commissioner and Director of Entertainment Industries, starting April 8.Pigott joins the City with an impressive and influential background as a strategic leader and champion for Toronto’s screen-based industries. Her most recent responsibilities were as Vice-President of Outreach and Strategic Initiatives for the Canadian Media Producers Association (CMPA), a position she has held since 2014.#CityofTO announces it has appointed Marguerite Pigott Toronto’s new Film Commissioner & Director of Entertainment Industries, starting work at the City on April 8. News release: https://t.co/PXpxGWcd79 pic.twitter.com/Lbm3KL1qqv— City of Toronto (@cityoftoronto) March 21, 2019 Twitterlast_img read more

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Indian to Aboriginal name change triggers mixed reaction on the street

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe shift in the title from minister of Indian affairs to minister of Aboriginal affairs has already provoked some strong reactions.APTN National News reporter Meagan Fiddler examines some responses to the question of: what’s in a name?last_img

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One quarter of Canadians have little to no faith in Aboriginal peoples

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Canadian Race Relations Foundation has unveiled the results of one of its surveys.It examined the perception Canadians have toward Aboriginal people, especially since the Idle No More movement sparked in December.APTN National News reporter Ntawnis Piapot has more on the story.last_img

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Morning manhunt triggers Attawapiskat airport shutdown

first_imgAPTN National News ATTAWAPISKAT, Ont.—The Attawapiskat airport was closed and the local school was put in lockdown after police launched a morning manhunt for a 36-year-old man following reports of shots being fired.Nishnawbe-Aski Sgt. Jackie George said shortly after noon that the man had been apprehended and the lockdowns ended.“There is no longer a concern for public safety at this time,” said George.Police received a report at about 8:30 a.m. that a shot had been fired in the community. The man was chased by police and fled into the bush.Attawapiskat is about 630 kilometres north of Timmins, Ont.@APTNNewsnews@aptn.calast_img read more

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Indigenous scholar alleges toxic workplace at think tank investigating VicePresident over racially

first_imgRelated Story: Top think tank VP facing probe over ‘racially prejudiced’ remarks about Indigenous peoples, Asians Bloom is currently under an internal investigation by an external ethics officer after he was secretly recorded by a former employee, who is an Algonquin man, making racialized generalizations about Indigenous peoples, Asians and people from the Caribbean community.He is currently on a leave of absence.Dalton, who moved to Ottawa from Toronto with her ailing mother, worked for the think tank from April 11 to Aug. 29 when she was suddenly fired over the use of a corporate credit card.Dalton, who is of Mohawk, Innu and Metis heritage, reported directly to Doug Watt, a director in the think tank, who works essentially as the deputy to Bloom, who is vice-president for industry and business strategy.Watt faced a human resources investigation over the summer triggered by multiple complaints alleging abusive behaviour toward employees, APTN National News has learned. Watt received a warning as a result of the investigation.According to Dalton’s court filing with the Ontario Superior Court, she faced a chaotic and disorganized workplace when she entered the Conference Board.“(Dalton) discovered there was a very high turnover of employees with the Board as a result of the negative, toxic work environment,” according to the statement of claim. “(Dalton) was directed to take over two projects from an employee who had recently announced his departure. The projects were in disarray.”Dalton alleges she was assigned tasks that had nothing to do with her areas of expertise, which focused on Indigenous peoples and the justice system.Jennifer Dalton is currently a visiting researcher at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Canadian and Aboriginal studies.The statement of claim states that Watt gave her an interim performance review in June that concluded she had a “bright future with the Board.”She was fired on Aug. 29 after a series of meetings on the use of her American Express corporate credit with had run up a $6,700 bill.The statement of claim states Dalton had agreed to pay the balance with payroll deductions and vacation pay. Dalton was told she was facing a possible suspension before being dismissed, according to the statement of claim. Three days before she was fired, Dalton suffered a migraine headache which forced her to stay home.The statement of claim alleges that Dalton faced “harassment and bullying” from Barb Hogberg, the vice-president of human resources, during the process.Dalton alleges she raised this issue with Bloom and Watt. After this complaint, Hogberg immediately suspended Dalton without pay and revoked her access to the building and computer network, according to the statement of claim.The Conference Board of Canada’s statement of defence in the case denies Dalton’s allegations about the workplace environment in the think tank. The statement of defence also alleges Dalton was initially informed by American Express that the corporate credit card was only for business expenses.The document alleges Dalton used the corporate credit card for expenses at Aldo, Nordstrom, Chateau Laurier and a dinner in Chelsea, Que. The Conference Board of Canada states in the document it proposed paying off the credit card debt and allow Dalton to repay the sum with payroll deductions.“Dalton flatly refused this offer, claiming she could not afford such a deduction from her pay,” said the statement of defence.The statement of defence said the Conference Board refused Dalton’s proposal to pay off the credit card through her vacation pay.“The Board declined the arrangement, as it believes vacation time is vital to employee health and did not want Dalton working many months without time off,” said the statement of defence.None of the allegations contained in any of the documents filed as part of this lawsuit have been proven by a court of law.Dalton declined comment because she is involved in ongoing legal action.The Conference Board of Canada said in a statement the investigation of Bloom is “underway and proceeding as expeditiously as possible.”The statement said the Conference Board would not comment on any circumstances “regarding individual employees” or active lawsuits.“Your questions involve personal and confidential matters which can’t be discussed in the media,” said the statement.Dalton—whose research has delved into the high rates of Indigenous inmates in prison, the impact of the Supreme Court’s Gladue decision and applying Indigenous knowledge to the justice system—worked in the same department as Veldon Coburn, an Algonquin academic tasked with working on a Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) contract to update a training program with exercises aimed at Indigenous inmates.Veldon Coburn secretly recorded his boss at the Conference Board of Canada because he was tired of hearing his racist comments.Coburn, who also left the Conference Board, secretly recorded Bloom during a Sept. 13 meeting discussing concerns over the objectives of CSC with the program update. Coburn told Bloom he was uncomfortable with CSC’s approach which he viewed amounted to “tokenism” because officials wanted beads and moccasins used in the examples.CSC wanted to update its training exercises based on a workshop run by its corporate arm, CORCAN, which produces moccasins, drums and key chains made by inmates and marketed as hand-made Indigenous items to stores in Ontario for resale.Bloom disagreed with Coburn, according to the recording, and told him people wanted to “see themselves” in the program exercises.“I think the case for Indigenous people, you see more often, at least from what I read, people who will be silent, you know. Yes, you the person who punched somebody, but the silence thing is an issue,” Bloom told Coburn, according to the recording.Bloom also told Coburn, Asians don’t know how to say “no” and that most of the people in Toronto jails are from the Caribbean community.Coburn said he recorded the conversation because of Bloom’s statements in a previous meeting where the vice-president questioned Indigenous peoples’ work ethic.During the recording, Coburn attempted to bring up Bloom’s past statement on work ethic by referring to labour force research data that contradicted the assertion. Coburn faced a dismissive retort from the vice-president.“We don’t have time to look at the data, so if there is something that is not clear, don’t do it, we don’t have any time. This thing has blown its budget beyond belief,” said Bloom, in the recording. “I don’t know anything about that one. I have no idea. It sounds to me it’s nothing where there is good evidence on it, just use real things.”Coburn sent his concerns to Hogberg in emails, but he said the human resources head did little to deal with his concerns about Bloom’s “racially prejudiced” remarks.“I am without words to describe how it feels when a non-Indigenous person lectures me on how I should feel and I must accept their denigrating view of Indigenous peoples, that I should not be offended by racist views of Indigenous peoples,” wrote Coburn, to Hogberg on Sept. 30, while he was off work on vacation. “My ancestry and heritage notwithstanding, the views expressed by Michael (Bloom) should not be held by anyone. They are the same, tired, stereotypical perspective of Indigenous peoples as inferior, the same ones used for decades to depict Indigenous peoples in a negative light, and they have no basis in fact.”Hogberg did not address any of Coburn’s points in her response, which came a little over an hour later.“Thanks for your note,” wrote Hogberg, adding that he could extend his vacation. “Veldon, I was pleased to read that you are getting some rest on this vacation.”Prominent professor Hayden King, with Carleton University’s School of Public Policy and Administration, said Coburn faced a “classic” case of the type of willful ignorance on Indigenous issues and the racist and stereotypical views perpetuated by officials at the highest levels of corporate and political Canada.“The head of a research think tank, supposedly privileging data and evidence, who relies on anecdotes and assumptions about the nature or culture of Indigenous peoples as passive or incompetent or whatever to shape his organization’s orientation,” said King. “All the data in the world wouldn’t matter. And I think this helps confirm that when industry and government speak of inclusion, they often do mean tokenism. They mean: ‘We seek to validate our status quo, thinly veiled assimilative agenda.’ And when Indigenous—or racialized people—refuse to acquiesce to this role or perspective, they are marginalized, excused, and belittled.”Correctional Service of Canada refused to comment on whether the views of Indigenous peoples held by Bloom would taint the product delivered by the Conference Board of Canada to the federal prison agency.Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale’s office also would not comment on the possible impact the views of the top think tank official handling the CSC contract at the think tank could have on the final product delivered to Ottawa.Goodale’s office oversees CSC.Federal Correctional Investigator Howard Sapers has repeatedly raised concerns about the “disturbing reality of Aboriginal overrepresentation in Canadian correctional populations.” Indigenous inmates account for 23 per cent of the total inmate population, yet Indigenous people comprise 3.8 per cent of the total population of Canada.On any given day, there are about 3,500 Indigenous people in federal prisons, according to data released by Sapers’ office.jbarrera@aptn.ca Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsAn Indigenous scholar alleges the Conference Board of Canada operates under a “toxic work environment” which created a high “turnover” of employees at the think tank, according to a document filed as part of a lawsuit in Ontario.The lawsuit was filed on Sept. 15 by Jennifer Dalton, currently a visiting researcher at the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Canadian and Aboriginal studies. The lawsuit alleges Dalton was wrongfully fired from the think tank, which is one of the most prominent organizations of its kind in Canada.Dalton, who is  seeking at least $175,000 in damages, worked in a department headed by a Conference Board of Canada vice-president named Michael Bloom.Michael Bloom, VP, Conference Board of Canadalast_img read more

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Judge Redo part of analysis for Dakota Access pipeline

first_imgLand protectors fought pitched battles with Local, and State police, elements of private security firms and the National Guard to try and stop the Dakota Access Pipline. Photo: Dennis Ward/APTNThe Canadian PressU.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in a 91-page decision that the Corps failed to take into account how a spill might affect “fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline’s effects are likely to be highly controversial.”The judge said the Army must redo its environmental analysis in certain sections and he’ll consider later whether the pipeline must halt operations in the meantime. A status conference is scheduled for next week.Dave Archamabault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which has led opposition to the pipeline, called it “a significant victory.”Developer Energy Transfer Partners announced earlier this month that it started shipping oil to customers. ETP maintains that the 1,200-mile pipeline is safe, but the Standing Rock Cheyenne River, Yankton and Oglala Sioux tribes in the Dakotas fear environmental harm.ETP spokeswoman Vicki Granado did not immediately return email and phone messages seeking comment on Boasberg’s ruling. U.S. Department of Justice spokeswoman Nicole Navas Oxman said the department is reviewing the ruling.The decision marks “an important turning point,” said Jan Hasselman, attorney for the non-profit Earthjustice, which is representing the tribes in the lawsuit.“Until now, the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have been disregarded by builders of the Dakota Access pipeline and the Trump Administration … prompting a well-deserved global outcry,” Hasselman said.The project led to months of demonstrations near the Standing Rock Reservation and hundreds of protesters were arrested. The protests died off with the clearing of the main encampment in February and the completion of the pipeline.Boasberg rejected two earlier complaints by the tribes. One was that the construction threatened sites of cultural and historical significance and the other was that the presence of oil in the pipeline under Lake Oahe would desecrate sacred waters and make it impossible for the tribes to freely exercise their religious beliefs.“Now that the court has rejected these two lines of attack, Standing Rock and Cheyenne River here take their third shot, this time zeroing in DAPL’s environmental impact,” Boasberg wrote. He added later, “This volley meets with some degree of success.”The corps originally declined to issue an easement for drilling and earlier this year launched a full environmental study of the Lake Oahe crossing, which it said would take up to two years to complete. Boasberg, the federal judge, had rejected an ETP request to stop the study.“As we all know, elections have consequences, and the government’s position on the easement shifted significantly once President Trump assumed office on January 20, 2017,” Boasberg wrote in Wednesday’s ruling.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Alberta Health Services fires two employees over Indigenous racial slur

first_imgThe Canadian PressThe organization that delivers health programs for the Alberta government has fired two employees over a racial slur made against an Indigenous educator.Last week Alberta Health Services apologized for a text message that was sent between two workers that referred to a member of the Kainai Board of Education as a “rabid squaw.”Dr. Verna Yiu, CEO of AHS, said Monday that two employees have been terminated effective immediately.“This incident is not representative of who AHS is or what AHS stands for,” Yiu said in a release.“All AHS employees are expected to adhere to our Code of Conduct, which includes treating all people with dignity and fairness.”The slur was accidentally sent to an employee of the Kainai Board of Education, which provides services for the Blood Tribe in southern Alberta.Last Friday Annette Bruisedhead, deputy superintendent of the board, said the AHS employee later apologized.Bruisedhead called the comment a severe act of discrimination and racism that would not be tolerated.At the time Ramona Big Head, the principal of the middle school on the reserve, said she was the employee being referred to in the text.She said the AHS official and many others “share the same dark, racist thoughts.”A spokeswoman for the chief and council said the incident has hurt many people.Yiu said no further information about the terminations or the fired employees would be released.“AHS is committed to advancing the process of reconciliation with Indigenous peoples and communities, and we will move forward from this incident together with our Indigenous communities and all Albertans.”news@aptn.calast_img read more

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MMIW inquiry in communication with Ontario police watchdog over probe into 9

first_imgJorge Barrera APTN National NewsOfficials with the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW) have been in contact with the office of Ontario’s police watchdog over its ongoing probe into the Thunder Bay police’s handling of nine cases involving murdered and missing women from the city.Lead MMIW commission counsel Susan Vella has reached out to Independent Police Review Director Gerry McNeilly’s office’s on the issue as it dovetails with the inquiry’s own review of police conduct on MMIW cases, said Bernée Bolton, the inquiry’s director of communication.“The national inquiry continues to follow (McNeilly’s) investigation regarding the handling of nine death investigations concerning Indigenous women and girls by the Thunder Bay police with great interest,” said Bolton, in an emailed statement. “At this time, we will not be offering further comment regarding the context of communication between McNeilly’s office and the national inquiry because these are active investigations.”McNeilly said in an interview with APTN National News this week that the nine murdered and missing Indigenous women cases primarily stem from 2009 to the present. McNeilly said the nine cases are part of a total of 39 Thunder Bay death cases going back to the 1990s his office is reviewing as part of a wide-ranging probe of the city’s police force over allegations of systemic racism.“The national inquiry is very aware of the situation in Thunder Bay,” said Bolton.The inquiry sent a small team of legal, health and community relations officials to Thunder Bay this week to meet with family members and survivors. The team held one-on-one meetings with families and survivors.The inquiry originally planned to hold full community hearings this week in the city, but it postponed the event to the week of Dec. 4, 2017.The inquiry has been beset by numerous setbacks, including the high profile resignation of top officials and one of its commissioners Marilyn Poitras.Sue Montgomery, the inquiry’s former director of communications, told APTN host Dennis Ward Friday that the commissioners should “stop the process right now and come up with a detailed plan and schedule.”Montgomery said the inquiry has suffered from a lack of leadership.However, the remaining inquiry commissioners have dismissed criticisms and calls for a reset, choosing instead to push on.The inquiry has the support of Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde. Bellegarde, along with Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Chief Bobby Cameron and British Columbia chiefs, short-circuited an attempt by Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Arlen Dumas to pass a resolution calling for the replacement of the inquiry commissioners during the organization’s annual general assembly in Regina this past July.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Quebec Innu say Newfoundland and Labrador Quebec living in bygone era over

first_imgAPTN NewsTwo Innu communities are lashing out at two provincial governments for ignoring their duty to consult over plans to develop a swath of mineral-rich land that straddles the Labrador, Quebec border.“Quebec and Newfoundland continue to live in a bygone era, one in which they believe it is still possible to disregard First Nations on their own territories,” said Chief Mike McKenzie of the Innu Takuaikan Uashat mak Mani-utenam in a release.“Not only was Quebec just recently trying to sideline us from federal environmental assessments, but is now entering into partnership agreements that we are learning about after the fact,”The land is called the Labrador Trough.The Innu say it is “largely” located within the traditional territory of the Innu of Uashat mak Mani-utenam and the Innu of Matimekush-Lac John.Both say they are asserting Aboriginal title and rights to the Labrador Trough and the minerals found there.Quebec Premier Phillipe Couillard, and Newfoundland and Labrador held a news conference Thursday in Quebec City to announce the deal.Quebec is encouraging the federal government to join the provinces in the project.The Labrador Trough is a 1,600 km wide swath of territory that runs from the northern border of Quebec and Labrador to the south.The Innu of Uashat mak Mani-utenam and the Innu of Matimekush-Lac John are currently involved in a court case over mining and Aboriginal rights and title.They’re suing the IOC mining company for $900 million for not sharing in the profits of the mining operation on its territory.The case is currently pending before the Supreme Court.“What is most bothersome and harmful is that yesterday’s announcement completely ignores the legal conflict regarding IOC-Rio Tinto’s exploitation, without agreement, of a portion of such territory.“We are not opposed to responsible development so long as the companies seeking to operate on our territory are willing to respect our rights, our Mother Earth and our traditions,”  said McKenzie in the release.news@aptn.calast_img read more

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Catalan separatists regain majority in regional election

first_imgBARCELONA, Spain – Catalonia’s secessionist parties won enough votes Thursday to regain a slim majority in the regional parliament and give new momentum to their political struggle for independence from Spain.It was hardly an emphatic victory, however, as the separatists lost support compared to the previous vote in 2015, and a pro-unity party for the first time became biggest single bloc in the Catalan parliament.The result left more questions than answers about what’s next for Catalonia, where a long-standing push for independence escalated to a full-on clash with the Spanish government two months ago.It was also a blow to Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, who as a result of the separatists’ defiance ousted the Catalan Cabinet and called the early election hoping to keep them out of power.Instead, the election’s outcome favoured fugitive former Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont, who campaigned from Belgium where he is evading a Spanish judicial probe into the attempt to split from Spain. The investigation could lead to charges of rebellion and sedition that carry penalties of decades in prison.Puigdemont, who got the most votes of any separatist candidate, greeted the results with delight and called them a rebuke to Spain’s central government.“The Spanish state has been defeated,” Puigdemont said. “Mariano Rajoy has received a slap in the face from Catalonia.”In a televised appearance from Brussels, the 54 year-old former journalist didn’t make clear if he would try to return home, where an arrest warrant awaits him.The other main winner was Ines Arrimadas, the leading unionist candidate. Scoring 25 per cent of the votes, her pro-business Ciutadans (Citizens) party won 37 seats, which will be the biggest single bloc in the 135-seat regional assembly.“The pro-secession forces can never again claim they speak for all of Catalonia,” Arrimadas said, promising her party will continue to oppose the separatists. “We are going to keep fighting for a peaceful co-existence, common sense and for a Catalonia for all Catalans.”But pro-independence parties — Puigdemont’s Junts per Catalunya (Together for Catalonia), left-republican ERC and the anti-capitalist CUP — together won 70 seats, two above a majority but two less than in the previous parliament. The three groups fell short of winning a majority of votes, though, getting 48 per cent of the total.“The election has resolved very little,” said Andrew Dowling, a specialist in Catalan history at Cardiff University in Wales. “Independence has won but in a way similar to 2015 — majority of seats but not in votes.”Dowling said that with the independence vote not reaching over half of the ballots cast, the European Union was not likely to get involved although the bloc will be keen on seeing the Spanish government actively address Catalonia’s grievances.Rajoy has said that taking over control of the region again would be something he would consider if independence is sought by a new Catalan government. Spain’s constitution bars secession.Thursday’s election saw a record turnout of nearly 82 per cent of the 5.5 million eligible voters in Catalonia.The election was held under highly unusual circumstances, with several pro-independence leaders either jailed or in self-imposed exile for their roles in staging a banned independence referendum that was declared illegal by Spain’s highest court.Eight of the absent politicians were elected as lawmakers. Unless their status changes, they will have to renounce their seats and pass them on to other party members or else the pro-independence bloc could be down a crucial share of votes.Weeks of campaigning involved little debate about regional policy on issues such as public education, widening inequality and unemployment. At the heart of the battle instead was the recent independence push that led to Spain’s worst political crisis in decades.Tensions have been high in Catalonia since an Oct. 1 referendum backed independence, when Spanish police used rubber bullets and batons against voters who tried to block them from removing ballots from polling stations. Separatist regional lawmakers made a unilateral declaration of independence Oct. 27, prompting Spain’s national government to take the dramatic step of firing the regional government and dissolving the Catalan parliament. Courts later ordered the arrest of the former Catalan leaders.No incidents were reported during voting Thursday.A new Catalan attempt to secede would also be an unwelcome development for the European Union, which is already wrestling with legal complications from Britain’s planned exit from the bloc. Senior EU officials have backed Rajoy, and no EU country has offered support for the separatists.Catalonia’s independence ambitions also have scant support in the rest of Spain.The outcome of the political battle is crucial for the region, which accounts for 19 per cent of Spain’s gross domestic product. An economic slowdown has been the most immediate consequence of the Catalan independence push. Spain’s central bank last week cut its national growth forecasts for next year and 2019 to 2.4 per cent and 2.1 per cent, respectively, cutting a percentage point off its previous predictions and citing the conflict in Catalonia as the cause.___Associated Press writer Aritz Parra reported this story in Barcelona and AP writer Ciaran Giles reported from Madrid. AP writers Joseph Wilson and Karl Ritter in Barcelona, Lorne Cook in Brussels and Barry Hatton in Lisbon, Portugal, contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Quebecdeveloped mustard seed biofuel to be used in United Airlines flight

first_imgMONTREAL – Passengers aboard a United Airlines flight heading to Zurich from San Francisco on Friday will be propelled in part by a biofuel created by a Quebec company aiming to clean up the skies.Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. is the firm behind the biofuel made from Carinata mustard and company founder and president Steve Fabijanski believes it could help dramatically decarbonize the aviation industry.“For me, this is a very good example of Canadian innovation and especially innovation from Quebec in terms of looking at green solutions,” he said in an interview from Paris with The Canadian Press.Thirty per cent of the jet fuel used in the Boeing will be replaced by the biofuel, leading the company to proclaim the plane will emit 30 per cent less greenhouse gases than a regular flight.Fabijanski said he believes his company’s product is the greenest biofuel ever used in a plane to date and that partnering with United Airlines will serve as a showcase for attracting new projects.With a flight time of 11 hours, the California-to-Switzerland flight will be the longest transatlantic trip to date using biofuels and the second time Agrisoma’s mustard-based product will be used in a commercial flight.Last Jan. 28, it was used in a 15-hour transpacific Qantas Airways flight between Australia and the United States. In that instance, the biofuel replaced 10 per cent of the jet fuel.Currently, the technical and regulatory rules limit to 50 per cent the amount of biofuel that can be used in commercial aircraft.“Fifty per cent is the goal (for the company) and at 50 per cent, you’re making a significant impact in terms of greenhouse gas emissions,” said Fabijanski.As the number of air passengers has steadily grown, the aviation industry has set as a goal reducing CO2 emissions by 50 per cent compared to 2005 levels. The industry is responsible for two to three per cent of global emissions.Steven Guilbeault, an environmental activist and co-founder of Equiterre, says Agrisoma’s biofuel paves the way for air carriers to take a significant step in reducing their carbon footprint.“As an ecologist, what matters to me is that this type of technology is spreading and, as a Quebecer, I won’t hide the fact it makes me proud that it was developed in our backyard,” he said.The head of Cycle Capital Management, one of Agrisoma’s principal investors, didn’t hesitate to promote the virtues of biofuel.“If we put just 10 per cent of this fuel in all the planes around the world, we would accomplish great things,” said Andree-Lise Methot, the founder of the clean-tech venture capital fund manager.On top of the aviation industry, Methot said one of the main qualities of Carinata mustard is that it can grow on land that is not meant to feed people. So unlike ethanol, for example, its cultivation is not done at the expense of food.Once the oil is extracted from the plant, the residue becomes a protein-rich byproduct that can be used as feed for livestock.“Carinata grows when nothing grows, it grows in difficult conditions, it’s what I call a seed adapted to climate change and, in addition, it yields two beautiful products: biofuel and organic food for animals,” she said.last_img read more

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Lyft heads for initial public offering

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Lyft is readying for an initial public offering of shares as it pushes toward becoming a publicly traded company.The San Francisco ride-sharing service said Thursday that it confidentially submitted a draft registration statement for the proposed IPO with the Securities and Exchange Commission.The number of shares to be offered and the price range for the proposed offering have not yet been determined. The company was valued at just over $15 billion earlier this year.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Walgreens expands prescription delivery program nationwide

first_imgWalgreens is joining drugstore competitor CVS Health in expanding home deliveries for prescriptions nationwide, as stores continue adjusting to a retail world made more customer-friendly by online competition.Walgreens said Thursday it will partner with FedEx to deliver prescriptions as soon as the next day for a $4.99 fee, and it also is providing same-day deliveries in several cities. The Deerfield, Illinois, company started offering deliveries in several markets last October.CVS Health Corp. announced similar nationwide prescription deliveries last June.Retailers have been breaking out more customer-friendly services in recent years to hold Amazon.com at bay. The online retailer offers members same-day deliveries of goods typically sold in drugstores in some places.Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. and CVS Health both run more than 9,000 U.S. locations.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Initial public offerings scheduled to debut next week

first_imgNEW YORK — The following is a list of initial public offerings planned for the coming week. Sources include IPO ETF manager Renaissance Capital, and SEC filings.Week of Dec. 10.360 Finance – Shanghai, China, 3.1 million shares, priced $16.50-$18.50, managed by Citi/Haitong. Proposed NYSE symbol: QFIN. Business: Chinese online consumer lending platform partnered with 360 Group (Qihoo).CF Finance Acquisition – New York, 25 million shares, priced at $10, managed by Cantor Fitzgerald. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CFFAU. Business: Blank check company formed by the CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald.CURE Pharmaceutical Holding – Oxnard, Calif., 2 million shares, priced $5-$7, managed by Network 1 Financial Securities. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CURR. Business: Developing oral dissolving film formulations of existing drugs.Chardan Healthcare Acquisition – New York, 7 million shares, priced at $10, managed by Chardan Capital Markets. Proposed NYSE symbol: CHACU. Business: Blank check company formed by Chardan to acquire a healthcare business.Cornerstone Management – Guangzhou, China, 5 million shares priced at $4, managed by ViewTrade. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: CSCA. Business: China-based private equity fund manager.Legacy Housing – Bedford, Texas, 3.5 million shares, priced $10.75-12.75, managed by B. Riley FBR/Oak Ridge Financial. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: LEGH. Business: Builds, sells and finances manufactured homes.Moderna – Cambridge, Mass., 26.3 million shares, priced $22-$24, managed by Morgan Stanley/Goldman Sachs. Proposed Nasdaq symbol MRNA. Business: Early-stage biotech developing therapies based on its modified mRNA platform.Schultze Acquisition – Rye Brook, N.Y., 15 million shares, priced at $10, managed by EarlyBirdCapital/BTIG. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: SAMAU. Business: Blank check company formed by distressed debt investor George Schultze.Synthorx – La Jolla, Calif., 11.9 million shares, priced $10-$12, managed by Jefferies/Leerink Partners. Proposed Nasdaq symbol: THOR. Business: Principal biotech developing immunotherapies for solid tumors.Tencent Music Entertainment – Shenzhen, China, 82 million shares, priced $13-$15, managed by Morgan Stanley/Goldman Sachs (Asia). Proposed NYSE symbol: TME. Business: China’s largest online music-streaming service.Uranium Trading – El Segundo, Calif., 4.5 million shares, priced at $10, managed by B. Riley FBR. Proposed NYSE symbol: UTC. Business: Newly-formed vehicle investing in the civil uranium market.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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