Go back to the enewsletter This months unravellin

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterThis month’s unravelling of Crystal Expeditions Cruises’ full 2021 program for the all-suite Crystal Endeavor reveals a diverse mix of brand-new itineraries, including a detailed exploration of southern Australia and along the west coast.Operating from Melbourne on 24 March 2021 will be a 10-night Great Australian Adventure sailing through to Perth. The one-of-a-kind exploration will include a selection of up-close and maiden calls for Crystal at King Island in Bass Strait, Port Lincoln in South Australia and Middle Island, Western Australia.The voyage will also include stops at Kangaroo Island, Adelaide, Albany and Busselton, but it’s Crystal Endeavor‘s smaller size (at just 200 guests) that will enable the company to unlock some of the most remote locations along the bottom of Australia’s mainland.Lake Hillier, Middle Island, Western AustraliaItinerary highlights will include the Barossa Valley and Margaret River wine regions, Torndirrup and Lincoln National Parks and the Middleton Beach Boardwalk Trail. But perhaps the most unique destination of the journey will be an exploration of the rugged Middle Island in the Recherche Archipelago off the WA coastline.Middle Island is a virtual wildlife sanctuary and breeding colony of penguins, home to sapphire-blue waters and the remarkable Lake Hillier, also billed as “Bubble Gum Lake” due to its brilliant pink hue.Crystal Endeavor’s 10-night Great Australian AdventureKaren Christensen, Crystal’s Senior Vice President and Managing Director for Australasia said Australia was home to spectacular fauna and flora and stunning locales that attract adventurers from around the globe.“The size of Crystal Endeavor allows her to visit remote and secluded destinations unattainable for larger vessels, taking guests to Middle Island to visit the world-famous pink Lake Hillier, for example, and visiting locations teeming with Australian wildlife such as the elusive platypus and rare parrots of King Island, Tasmania,” Christensen told LATTE.“Australia’s landscape provides an incredibly diverse range of experiences – whether in true expedition style or cultural discoveries – exploring the many renowned wine, cheese and seafood destinations. The Great Australian Adventure itinerary features the same diversity, and I am confident that the world’s largest and most spacious luxury expedition yacht will encounter ports of call that will attract locals and globe-trotters alike.”Turquoise Bay, Ningaloo, Western AustraliaImmediately following the Great Australian Adventure will be a 13-night Expedition to the Java Sea from Perth to Singapore, departing on 3 April 2021. It also features a number of new port calls in Western Australia for Crystal: Jurien Bay, Abrolohos Islands and Turquoise Bay at Ningaloo. That voyage will then track further north, stopping at Christmas Island before exploring regions of Indonesia and concluding in Singapore.Abrolhos Islands, Western AustraliaThe Great Australian Adventure itinerary is currently priced from US$11,699 per person twin share for an S7 Deluxe Suite, when booked by 30 April 2019.Fares for the Expedition to the Java Sea start at US$14,949 per person twin share.Lead image: King Island, TasmaniaGo back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

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Chinas quantum satellite achieves spooky action at record distance

first_img By Gabriel PopkinJun. 15, 2017 , 2:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Jian-Wei Pan, a physicist at the University of Science and Technology of China in Shanghai, got the chance to test the idea when the Micius satellite, named after an ancient Chinese philosopher, was launched in August 2016. The satellite is the foundation of the $100 million Quantum Experiments at Space Scale program, one of several missions that China hopes will make it a space science power on par with the United States and Europe.In their first experiment, the team sent a laser beam into a light-altering crystal on the satellite. The crystal emitted pairs of photons entangled so that their polarization states would be opposite when one was measured. The pairs were split, with photons sent to separate receiving stations in Delingha and Lijiang, 1200 kilometers apart. Both stations are in the mountains of Tibet, reducing the amount of air the fragile photons had to traverse. This week in Science, the team reports simultaneously measuring more than 1000 photon pairs. They found the photons had opposite polarizations far more often than would be expected by chance, thus confirming spooky action over a record distance (though the 2015 test over a shorter distance was more stringent).The team had to overcome many hurdles, including keeping the beams of photons focused on the ground stations as the satellite hurtled through space at nearly 8 kilometers per second. “Showing and demonstrating it is quite a challenging task,” says Alexander Ling, a physicist at the National University of Singapore. “It’s very encouraging.” However, Ling notes that Pan’s team recovered only about one photon out of every 6 million sent from the satellite—far better than ground-based experiments but still far too few for practical quantum communication.Pan expects China’s National Space Science Center to launch additional satellites with stronger and cleaner beams that could be detected even when the sun is shining. (Micius operates only at night.) “In the next 5 years we plan to launch some really practical quantum satellites,” he says. In the meantime, he plans to use Micius to distribute quantum keys to Chinese ground stations, which will require longer strings of photons and additional steps. Then he wants to demonstrate intercontinental quantum key distribution between stations in China and Austria, which will require holding one half of an entangled photon pair on board until the Austrian ground station appears within view of the satellite. He also plans to teleport a quantum state—a technique for transferring quantum-encoded information without moving an actual object—from a third Tibetan observatory to the satellite.Other countries are inching toward quantum space experiments of their own. Ling is teaming up with physicists in Australia to send quantum information between two satellites, and the Canadian Space Agency recently announced funding for a small quantum satellite. European and U.S. teams are also proposing putting quantum instruments on the International Space Station. One goal is to test whether entanglement is affected by a changing gravitational field, by comparing a photon that stays in the weaker gravitational environment of orbit with an entangled partner sent to Earth, says Anton Zeilinger, a physicist at the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna. “There are not many experiments which test links between gravity and quantum physics.”The implications go beyond record-setting demonstrations: A network of satellites could someday connect the quantum computers being designed in labs worldwide. Pan’s paper “shows that China is making the right decisions,” says Zeilinger, who has pushed the European Space Agency to launch its own quantum satellite. “I’m personally convinced that the internet of the future will be based on these quantum principles.” China’s quantum satellite achieves ‘spooky action’ at record distance Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Theoretically, even if entangled objects are separated, their precarious quantum states should remain linked until one of them is measured or disturbed. That measurement instantly determines the state of the other object, no matter how far away. The idea is so counterintuitive that Albert Einstein mocked it as “spooky action at a distance.”Starting in the 1970s, however, physicists began testing the effect over increasing distances. In 2015, the most sophisticated of these tests, which involved measuring entangled electrons 1.3 kilometers apart, showed once again that spooky action is real.Beyond the fundamental result, such experiments also point to the possibility of hack-proof communications. Long strings of entangled photons, shared between distant locations, can be “quantum keys” that secure communications. Anyone trying to eavesdrop on a quantum-encrypted message would disrupt the shared key, alerting everyone to a compromised channel.But entangled photons degrade rapidly as they pass through the air or optical fibers. So far, the farthest anyone has sent a quantum key is a few hundred kilometers. “Quantum repeaters” that rebroadcast quantum information could extend a network’s reach, but they aren’t yet mature. Many physicists have dreamed instead of using satellites to send quantum information through the near-vacuum of space. “Once you have satellites distributing your quantum signals throughout the globe, you’ve done it,” says Verónica Fernández Mármol, a physicist at the Spanish National Research Council in Madrid. “You’ve leapfrogged all the problems you have with losses in fibers.” Quantum entanglement—physics at its strangest—has moved out of this world and into space. In a study that shows China’s growing mastery of both the quantum world and space science, a team of physicists reports that it sent eerily intertwined quantum particles from a satellite to ground stations separated by 1200 kilometers, smashing the previous world record. The result is a stepping stone to ultrasecure communication networks and, eventually, a space-based quantum internet.”It’s a huge, major achievement,” says Thomas Jennewein, a physicist at the University of Waterloo in Canada. “They started with this bold idea and managed to do it.”Entanglement involves putting objects in the peculiar limbo of quantum superposition, in which an object’s quantum properties occupy multiple states at once: like Schrödinger’s cat, dead and alive at the same time. Then those quantum states are shared among multiple objects. Physicists have entangled particles such as electrons and photons, as well as larger objects such as superconducting electric circuits. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country CREDITS: (GRAPHIC) C. BICKEL/SCIENCE; (DATA) JIAN-WEI PAN last_img read more

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